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Contact Name
Mufid Febrianto
Contact Email
mas.mufid@coconutcommunity.org
Phone
+628111885787
Journal Mail Official
journal@coconutcommunity.org
Editorial Address
8th Floor BAPPEBTI Building Jl. Kramat Raya No. 172 Kenari, Senen, Jakarta, Indonesia 10430 Phone +62 21 3100556-557 Fax +62 21 3101007
Location
Kota adm. jakarta pusat,
Dki jakarta
INDONESIA
CORD
ISSN : 02151162     EISSN : 27218856     DOI : 10.37833/cord
Aims CORD aims to publish original research results and reviews on research and development. While encouraging those involved in research and developments to disseminate their finding it also assists policy makers and planners to be aware of the latest developments in the sector Scope CORD encompasses a broad range of research topics in animal sciences: seedlings and genetics, farming, harvesting, production, health, biotechnology, and production, socio-economic, and policy.
Articles 358 Documents
EVALUATION OF COCONUT BASED ANACARDIUM OCCIDENTALE AGROFORESTRY SYSTEM TO IMPROVE THE SOIL PROPERTIES OF COCONUT GROWING LANDS IN WET, INTERMEDIATE AND DRY ZONE OF SRI LANKA S. H. S. Senarathne
International Coconut Community Journal Vol 35 No 01 (2019): CORD
Publisher : International Coconut Community

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (436.775 KB) | DOI: 10.37833/cord.v35i01.5

Abstract

This study was intended to assess the impact of coconut based Anacardium occidentale (Cashew) agroforestry systems on soil fertility of degraded coconut lands in wet, intermediate and dry zones of Sri Lanka. Two treatments were evaluated according to randomized complete block design with three replicates. Coconut based agroforestry systems intercropped with A. occidentale and sole coconut were evaluated as two treatments. Soils from three depths were analyzed for its? chemical, physical and biological properties. According to the esults, higher total N, available P and exchangeable K levels were shown in sole coconut systems than A. occidentale intercropped system while the higher total N levels (2% higher than top soil and 27% higher than deepr soil) were observed in sub soils compared top and deep soils. Higher P content was observed in top soils than in deeper soils. The exchangeable K was observed in higher quantities in sub soil than in deeper soils and was varied with locations. Organic matter content in intercropping of A. occidentale has been increased by 37% and the highest was observed in top soils. Soil bulk density has been reduced by 9% in A. occidentale intercropped system enhancing the root growth. Bulk density has been increased with the depth of the soil. Higher soil microbial activity was observed in A. occidentale intercropped system and it was 22% higher than sole coconut system. Sole coconut system has 50% higher soil moisture percentage and the highest was recorded in sub soils. This study confirms that intercropping of A. occidentale has a positive effect on improving soil fertility of degraded coconut growing soils in wet, intermediate and dry zones of Sri Lanka.
EFFECT OF IMMERSION IN CALCIUM CHLORIDE SOLUTION ON THE CHARACTERISTIC OF COCONUT CHIPS DURING STORAGE Rindengan Barlina; Linda Trivana; Engelbert Manaroinsong
International Coconut Community Journal Vol 35 No 01 (2019): CORD
Publisher : International Coconut Community

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (880.491 KB) | DOI: 10.37833/cord.v35i01.6

Abstract

The quality of coconut chips can be increased, through efforts to improve processing by immersing the coconut meat in CaCl2 solution. The various concentrations of CaCl2 solution are 0.0%, 0.5%, 1.0%, 1.5%, and 2.0%. Furthermore, the effect of treatments was evaluated on the characteristic of coconut chips for 0 months, 2 months, 4 months, and 6 months of storage in plastic coated aluminum foil packaging. The results showed that coconut chips from DMT coconut meat with fruit 9 months old contain 2.36-2.49% moisture, 2.36-2.55% ash, 3.87-5.35% protein, 37.31-45.35% fat, 50.15-53.23% carbohydrate and 4.93-5.48% crude fiber. Immersion in CaCl2 solution and storage time increased the water content of coconut chips. The results of organoleptic testing showed that coconut chips still preferred by respondent up to 6 months of storage. The higher concentration of CaCl2 solution was used, resulting in smaller pressure (gram force) to break or destroy coconut chips, which can be interpreted that coconut chips have a crispness that is still good. Next, the color measurement uses Chromameter Konica Minolta CR-400, L (Lightness) value to 6 months ranged from 76.39-77.65, which indicated that the color of the product is still predominantly bright white.                      
COIR PITH – A MEDIUM FOR OIL ABSORPTION Anita Das Ravindranath
International Coconut Community Journal Vol 35 No 01 (2019): CORD
Publisher : International Coconut Community

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1235.539 KB) | DOI: 10.37833/cord.v35i01.9

Abstract

Coir pith, the byproduct of coconut husk, due to its abundance nature and its porous structure can be effectively used for oil adsorption. Modification of coir pith to make as hydrophobic may allow them to be used for oil adsorption. Oil spills can destroy marine aquatic life and have a great impact on environment. In this study coir pith have been treated enzymatically (Lipase, Protease & Glucanase) and chemically (Acetylation) to impart hydrophobicity and to enhance oil adsorption capacity. The coir pith samples were characterized periodically by FTIR, SEM. The extent of acetylation was evaluated by weight percent gain.The results suggests that acetylated coir pith could be beneficial in oil adsorption and potentially provide a low cost environmentally friend adsorbent for oil spill.
DIFFERENTIAL SCANNING CALORIMETRIC ANALYSIS OF VIRGIN COCONUT OIL, PALM OLEIN, AND THEIR ADULTERATED BLENDS J.M.N. Marikkar
International Coconut Community Journal Vol 35 No 01 (2019): CORD
Publisher : International Coconut Community

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (938.415 KB) | DOI: 10.37833/cord.v35i01.10

Abstract

Virgin coconut oil (VCO) is a premium product with a high market value. Its authenticity and quality assurance are important to safeguard consumers from fraudulent practices. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of adulteration by palm olein (PO) on differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) heating and cooling profiles of VCO. Pure samples of VCO, PO and their adulterated blends (5 to 30%, w/w) were subjected to thermal analysis by DSC according to a specified temperature program. DSC thermal analysis system software and SAS statistical system were used subsequently to analyze thermal data. Both cooling and heating curves of VCO were found to be vivid for fingerprint comparison of qualitative identification at 5% level of adulteration.
EFFECT OF DIFFERENT WEED MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES ON POPULATION CHANGING PATTERN OF PENNISETUM POLYSTACHION IN COCONUT PLANTATIONS OF SRI LANKA S.H.S. Senarathne
International Coconut Community Journal Vol 35 No 01 (2019): CORD
Publisher : International Coconut Community

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (667.502 KB) | DOI: 10.37833/cord.v35i01.12

Abstract

Pennisetum polystachion is a major problematic monocotyledonous weed species and a perennial problem in intermediate zone of coconut plantations in Sri Lanka. This study was carried out to evaluate the impacts of different management systems on P. polystachion seedling emergence patterns.The tested treatments were application of glyphosate (T1), cover cropping with Pueraria phaseoloides (T2), tractor harrowing (T3), tractor slashing (T4) and tractor ploughing (T5). All the treatments were applied twice a year except T2. As T2 cover crop at the initiation of the experiment and over grown conditions were managed by harrowing once a year. Based on the reduction in weed biomass, cover cropping (T2) was the best to reduce the P. polystachion population and to reduce P. polystachion seedling emergence density in the field. Chemical weeding was the second-best method to control the P. polystachion population in the field. The effectiveness of slashing in reducing weed seedling emergence density was lower than cover cropping and chemical weeding methods. The weed seedling emergence densities were almost similar in ploughed and harrowed plots. The seed depth of emerged seedling was very high in harrowed and ploughed treatments when compared to other treatments. Results given by T3 and T5 indicates that loosening the soil creates more favorable environment for the germination of weed seeds buried in soil. Therefore, it can be argued that the elimination of weed seeds in the top 2cm or 4cm in the soil seed bank by any means is likely to reduce the level of weed infestation by about 60% to 95%. Results also indicated that burying rhizomes in ploughing and harrowing treatment plots at the depths below 30 - 40 cm is effective in controlling germination of this weed species. This experiment also suggested that keeping rhizomes on the soil surface without burying for durations of 5 ? 15 days would produce weak plants with poor development.
MANAGEMENT OF COCONUT MITE IN BANGLADESH INVOLVING COMMUNITIES AS IMPLANTER Md. Nazirul Islam
International Coconut Community Journal Vol 34 No 2 (2018): CORD
Publisher : International Coconut Community

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (4064.409 KB) | DOI: 10.37833/cord.v34i2.13

Abstract

A study on management of coconut mite (Aceria guerreronis Keifer, Acari: Eriophyidae) was carried out in farmers fields at Bagharpara Sub-district of Jashore district, in an area of about 696 ha during May 2011 to June 2014. The mite attacking coconut in Bangladesh remained unidentified until 2008. Field and laboratory studies on morpho-anatomy revealed that 2-6 month old nuts hosted colonies of mites while no mites were found on unfertilized button (flowers) and nuts of more than 06 months old. Colonization was found maximum in younger nuts of 3 -4 month old. Mites were found to reside under the perianth near the stalk of young coconut. Six different treatments  viz, removing of infested young nuts and foliar application of Omite @ 0.2% adjacent to the bunch region (T1);  removing of infected young nuts and foliar application of Neem-oil @ 0.3% adjacent to the bunch region (T2); T1 & soil incorporation of Neem cake @ 500g/tree (T3); T1 & soil incorporation of tricho-compost @ 2000g/tree (T4); T2 & soil incorporation of Neem cake @ 500g/tree (T5) and T2 & incorporation of tricho-compost 2000g/tree  (T6). Results of three consecutive years showed that all the treatments were equally effective in controlling mite attack in coconut. Edible portion of mature nuts was found to improve by the treatments T3 and T5, containing soil incorporated Neem cake.  Days to spath opening, male phase, number of bunch and nut per bunch were not influenced by any one of the treatments. On an average 77 nuts were harvested/palm/year and their estimated market value was Taka 1540. Income augmented due to technology was Taka 1339.80 with BCR value 6.      
THE INFLUENCE OF VERMICOMPOSTING TECHNOLOGY ON SOLUBILITY OF EPPAWALA ROCK PHOSPHATE S.H.S. Senarathne
International Coconut Community Journal Vol 34 No 2 (2018): CORD
Publisher : International Coconut Community

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (648.566 KB) | DOI: 10.37833/cord.v34i2.15

Abstract

The application of Eppawala Rock Phosphate (ERP) could be an economic alternative to the use of imported phosphorus fertilizer for certain annual as well as perennial crops like coconut in acid soils. But, its low solubility limits direct application. For Vermicomposting technology, which is a biodegradation process of plant and animal waste materials through earthworms, has been tested for increasing the solubility of ERP. Fresh Gliricidia leaves, fresh cow dung and grasses were mixed 1:2:1 ratio as the basic composting mixture and ERP was mixed at the ratio of 10% and 20% to the composting materials. Forty numbers of earthworms were added to each of the plastic containers with the composting mixture, having five replicates per treatment.                Addition of ERP in to mixture showed no effect on the multiplication rate of earth worms.  The nutrient availability of compost was measured with time and compared with the control (T1). Each treatment had the similar amount of nitrogen in the system and that indicates the addition of rock phosphate has a minimal effect or no effect on conversion or losses of available nitrogen.  Addition of ERP increased the availability of phosphorus and it was significantly higher in T4 and T3 than other treatments.  Available phosphorus value was significantly increased from 4% (T5 and T6) to 9 % in T3 and T4 treatments. Total potassium content decreased in all treatments compare with control.  Therefore, vermicomposting can be utilized to increase the solubility of ERP while increasing the available phosphorus in the end product.
RESPONSE SURFACE OPTIMIZATION FOR EXTRACTION OF PHENOLICS FROM COCONUT TESTA (PAIRINGS) K.D.P.P. Gunathilake
International Coconut Community Journal Vol 34 No 2 (2018): CORD
Publisher : International Coconut Community

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (753.4 KB) | DOI: 10.37833/cord.v34i2.16

Abstract

Response surface methodology in conjunction with central composite design (CCD) was performed in the present study to optimize the extraction parameters for assessing maximum yield of total phenolic content and antioxidant capacity from coconut pairings. Solvent concentration (30-100%), extraction temperature (30-60°C) and extraction time (30-90 min) were used as the independent variables.  The optimum conditions for extraction of total phenolics and antioxidant capacity from coconut pairings were found to be at ethanol concentration, 47.75% (v/v); extraction temperature, 49.84°C; and extraction time, 68.66 minutes. Under these optimal conditions, the model predicted a maximum response of 18.97 mg GAE/ g DW total phenolics and 38.09 mg AAE/g DW total antioxidant capacity of coconut pairing extracts  and they were in close agreement with predicted values, thus indicating the suitability of the models developed and the success of RSM in optimizing the extraction conditions.
EFFECT OF ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZAL FUNGI BASED BIOFERTILIZER ON COCONUT SEEDLINGS GROWTH IN NURSERY S.H.S. Senarathne
International Coconut Community Journal Vol 34 No 2 (2018): CORD
Publisher : International Coconut Community

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (388.29 KB) | DOI: 10.37833/cord.v34i2.17

Abstract

The success of a coconut plantation, in terms of its field establishment as well as its future performance, is heavily dependent on the quality of the seedlings used. Coconut nurseries adopt different agronomic practices to produce good quality seedlings. Applying mycorrhizal inoculants is becoming an increasingly common practice in plant nurseries as it facilitates healthy seedling growth resulting in healthy and vigorous seedlings in the nursery, helps to reduce mortality rates of seedlings in the field and reduce water and fertilizer consumption. In this study effects of mycorrhizae based biofertilizer were evaluated for the growth of coconut seedlings in the nursery and field. The experiment was conducted at the Makadura Research Center in Sri Lanka. The nursery experiment treatments were, the presence of AMF based biofertilizer (50g per seedling or per bag) and absence of mycorrhizae based biofertilizer. In the field experiment, five treatments with 500g of AMF biofertilizerwith 25% recommended inorganic fertilizer mixture for young coconut palms (YPM) per seedling, 500g of AMF biofertilizer with 50% YPM per seedling, 500g of AMF biofertilizer with 75% YPM per seedling, 500g of AMF biofertilizer with 100% YPM per seedling and with only YPM per seedling. Root and shoot growth of seedlings were measured at monthly intervals in the nursery experiment. Leaf production rate and stem girth of the seedling were measured at six months interval in the field experiment. The application of bio fertilizer increased the volume and dry weight of primary, secondary, tertiary and quaternary roots in seedlings in the nursery significantly. A significantly higher leaf production rate and stem girth was observed in the field seedlings treatment with 500g of AMF biofertilizer with 75% YPM. The experiment concluded that application of bio fertilizer is beneficial for coconut seedlings in the nursery for the production good quality seedlings with well-developed roots resulting in better field establishment and in the field for fast and vigorous growth.
THE MOST FREQUENT AGRONOMIC PRACTICES USED BY THE COCONUT FARMERS IN THE “COCONUT TRIANGLE” OF SRI LANKA Lalith Perera
International Coconut Community Journal Vol 34 No 2 (2018): CORD
Publisher : International Coconut Community

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (268.772 KB) | DOI: 10.37833/cord.v34i2.18

Abstract

The study was carried out to identify the most frequently practiced cultural practices by coconut growers in the main coconut growing area termed as ?Coconut Triangle?, among a set of technical practices recommended by the Coconut Research Institute of Sri Lanka (CRISL). The objective was also to analyse the impact of these practices to the yield and to analyse the effects of the information sources to the growers to enhance the farmers skills. The study was carried out between June 2018 and August 2018. For the data collection, a questionnaire developed by CRISL was used and 62 growers were randomly selected. All the answers were gathered in a table file. Then, the data were analysed using tabular analysis and the software SPSS. The study reveals that most of the growers are having intercrops between the coconut trees, in large or very small scale even if the yield is lowand needs more space. For the soil moisture conservation around the coconut palm, the majority of the growers use the simple and low-cost technique; mulching around the coconut palms. However, 30.1% of the growers were found to not use any technique to improve the soil moisture even when the drought is a frequent event in the country, but this more valid for small scale growers. To improve their yield, majority of the growers preferred and used CRISL recommended coconut fertilizer mixture (Adult Palm Mixture or APM) over the other commercially available fertilizer mixtures. Finally, the study shows that farmers with large estates are the most involved to follow training programs and apply the advices given by the CRISL.           

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