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Wawan Sujarwo
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Research Center for Biology Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI) Cibinong Science Center, Cibinong 16911 West Java Indonesia
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INDONESIA
Journal of Tropical Ethnobiology
ISSN : 16936892     EISSN : 27220257     DOI : https://doi.org/10.46359/jte
Core Subject : Agriculture,
The journal publishes critical reviews, original research papers, short communications, notes and comments covering all aspects of ethnobiology. Journal of Tropical Ethnobiology readership is as wide and diverse as ethnobiology itself, with readers spanning from both the natural and social sciences. Not surprisingly, a glance at the papers published in the Journal reveals the depth and breadth of topics, extending from studies in archaeology and the origins of agriculture, to folk classification systems, to food composition, plants, birds, mammals, fungi and everything in between. Research areas published in Journal of Tropical Ethnobiology include but are not limited to neo- and paleo-ethnobiology, zooarchaeology, ethnobotany, ethnozoology, ethnopharmacology, ethnoecology, linguistic ethnobiology, human paleoecology, and many other related fields of study within anthropology and biology, such as taxonomy, conservation biology, ethnography, political ecology, and cognitive and cultural anthropology. Journal of Tropical Ethnobiology does not limit itself to a single perspective, approach or discipline, but seeks to represent the full spectrum and wide diversity of the field of ethnobiology, including cognitive, symbolic, linguistic, ecological, and economic aspects of human interactions with our living world. Articles that significantly advance ethnobiological theory and/or methodology are particularly welcome, as well as studies bridging across disciplines and knowledge systems. Journal of Tropical Ethnobiology does not publish uncontextualized data such as species lists; appropriate submissions must elaborate on the ethnobiological context of findings.
Articles 32 Documents
VALUE CHAIN ANALYSIS OF ORANGE COMMODITY IN THE BANTAMA MARKET, KUMASI, GHANA Sayson, Jiah; Jacob, Sanu; Sujarwo, Wawan; Imbiri, Soleman; Saraswati, Dewi; Nazziwa, Winfred
Journal of Tropical Ethnobiology Vol. 3 No. 1 (2020): January 2020
Publisher : The Ethnobiological Society of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1442.603 KB) | DOI: 10.46359/jte.v3i1.2

Abstract

The performanceof thelocal sub-sector of orange in Bantama, Kumasi should be improved. This study aims to improve the performance of the local orange value chain in the Bantama market using rich picture analysis, scenario analysis, cigar box analysis, stakeholders?analysis, and SWOT analysis. The study suggests two strategic objectives, (1)the Bantama orange traders association (BOTA) coped with lack of storage facilities, which is expected that BOTA is linked directly to at least three major orange processors in Bantama by conducting stakeholders meeting between BOTA and orange processors, and a memorandum of understanding between BOTA and orangeprocessors; (2) the local government promoted the orange industry of Bantama, which is expected thatBOTA advocated to the local government for the establishment of market storage facility by preparingadvocating plan by BOTA, and consultation meetings with local government.
BONE, MATTOMPANG ARAJANG, ‘KAYU GALADUPA’ (SINDORA GALEDUPA; FABACEAE) DAN JEJARING BUGIS NUSANTARA Keim, Ary Prihardhyanto; Nikmatullah, Muhamad; Arifa, Nissa; Adi, Tukul Rameyo; Wardah, Wardah; Sujarwo, Wawan
Journal of Tropical Ethnobiology Vol. 3 No. 1 (2020): January 2020
Publisher : The Ethnobiological Society of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1993.191 KB) | DOI: 10.46359/jte.v3i1.4

Abstract

The result of this current study shows that Bone as the centre of origin of the Bugisnese civilization is still preserving most of the original tradition alive like the Mattompang Arajang procession, which is now connected with the Anniversary of the City of Watampone, the capital of Bone Regency. Mattompang Arajang procession involves an important component, which is burning the incense. In the past, the incense burned was the indigenous Sulawesi incense known as ?kayu Galadupa? (thus the name of the resin is ?Kemenyan Galadupa? or Galadupa incense), which is identified here as the resin harvested from Sindora galedupa (Fabaceae). The species is very rarely seen in the forest now and this gave impact to the production of the resin. The Galadupa incense has not been used for many years and slowly forgotten and replaced by the more common Sumatran incense harvested from Styrax benzoin or S. sumatrana (Styracaceae). The Mattompang Arajang yearly procession also acts as a uniting moment for Bugisnese descents throughout Nusantara (i.e. Malay Archipelago and beyond). The prospect of creating a Nusantara Bugisnese Networking is also discussed. In connection with the Mattompang Arajang procession, as the procession is regarded deeply rooted in the Bugisnese existence, the indigenous incense should have been implemented and preserved. This is good news for the conservation of the Galadupa tree, Sindora galedupa in its own homeland.
PENGETAHUAN LOKAL DAN KEANEKARAGAMAN TUMBUHAN BERGUNA PADA MASYARAKAT BATULANTEH, PULAU SUMBAWA, NUSA TENGGARA BARAT: SEBUAH KAJIAN ETNOBOTANI Rahayu, Mulyati; Arifa, Nissa; Nikmatullah, Muhamad; Keim, Ary Prihardhyanto
Journal of Tropical Ethnobiology Vol. 3 No. 1 (2020): January 2020
Publisher : The Ethnobiological Society of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1232.546 KB) | DOI: 10.46359/jte.v3i1.6

Abstract

The study was conducted in Batulanteh District, Sumbawa regency, Sumbawa Island, West Nusa Tenggara, which is aimed to reveal the knowledge of the Samawa people on the diversity of useful plants and their uses. It documented 111 plant species, in which 47.5% are used as traditional medicine. Also, the sudy found that wild honey bees (Apis dorsata) is having a conspicuous association with plants in producing natural honey, which plays an important role in the local economy. The interviews with selected respondents showed that the Samawa people totally understand the importance of forest conservation in relation with the existence of the honey bees? life.
BIOSPHERE RESERVE CONCEPT IMPLEMENTATION FOR CREATING SUSTAINABILITY Purwanto, Y.; Nugroho, Hari; Achmadi, Anang Setiawan; Munawaroh, Esti
Journal of Tropical Ethnobiology Vol. 3 No. 1 (2020): January 2020
Publisher : The Ethnobiological Society of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1496.845 KB) | DOI: 10.46359/jte.v3i1.7

Abstract

The main priority of UNESCO MAB program is to emphasize the implementation of biosphere reserve concept for achieving sustainable development. Biosphere reserve is a concept of site management to harmonize the needs for conservation of both land and coastal ecosystem with the need for economic development in the basis of research on the utilization of natural resources, including cultural resources recognized by UNESCO MAB Program in order to promote a balanced relationship between human and the nature. Principally, the concept of biosfer reserve is applied to bring the conservation of biological diversity into line with sustainable development for achieving a balanced relationship between human and the nature. The advantage of applying the biosphere reserve concept lays on the excellent combination of its three functions, namely: (1) The function associated with conservation of biological resources, ecosystems, and cultural diversity; (2) The function associated with development that supports and enriches sustainable economic development through an ecologicaly and culturally wise approach; and (3) The function associated with provision of logistics supports for various activities related with conservation and sustainable development, in a local, regional, national, or global context, including research, education, training, and monitoring. In implementing those three functions integratively, a zonation approach is applied, in which the site of biosphere reserve is devided into three different areas with specific functions and roles: (1) The core area: It is the area for conservation and it must have a firm, long-term legal protection for preserving the biodiversity, monitoring the undisturbed ecosystems or undertaking non-destructive research, and other ?passive? activities such as education and training and ecosystem services; (2) The buffer zone: It is the area encircling or adjoining the core area that is determined to provide protection to the core area against the negative impacts of human activities; and (3) The transition area: The transition area. It is typically the largest part of the biosphere reserve area fuctioning to develope cooperation with local communities. It is established side by side with the buffer zone and this area is a place to develope models for sustainable development and develop an appropriate management of natural resources for the area. Biosphere reserves are used as a place to test and build a sustainable way of life through integrated programs of natural resources management and biodiversity conservation, with the objective to contribute in reducing poverty and increasing the living standard, especially of rural communities. In addition, the implementation of the biosphere reserve concept is also aimed to help reducing the loss of biodiversity, facilitating scientific development and bulding the capacity in the context of providing services neccessary for ecological sustainability.
ANIMISM IS APPLIED ETHNOBOTANY: A SHAMANIC HEALING RITUAL WITH THE DAYAK BENUAQ OHOOKNG / EAST KALIMANTAN Zahorka, Herwig
Journal of Tropical Ethnobiology Vol. 3 No. 1 (2020): January 2020
Publisher : The Ethnobiological Society of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1209.539 KB) | DOI: 10.46359/jte.v3i1.8

Abstract

The Dayak Benuaq Ohookng people believe in many and diverse territorial ghosts/spirits (wook) who exist in the environment, some of which have the power to remove the soul (juus) of a human body part or organ and, at the same time, implant disease. Consequently, this body part or organ gets sick. The mission of the shamans (pembeliatn), as mediums to the spiritual world, is to identify the ghost/spirit responsible during nocturnal rituals and to submit all of the diverse ritual offerings possible, including making an exchange of a ?soul? (kelakar) made from ironwood (Eusideroxylon zwageri). To get rid of the disease, the patient smears some of his/her own saliva onto a carved statue (sepatukng silih), depicting the ghost/spirit concerned, after the shaman activated it. Later, this statue is taken to the forest. The shaman can also extract the disease from the sick body part by help of a thinly spliced banana leaf (telolo). The disease can also be attached to the statue or put into the blood of sacrificial animals. In order to finally find and identify the lost soul of the patient?s sick body part, the shaman performs a vigorous dance and then falls into a trance, during which he receives a message about where to catch the soul. To discover the soul and capture it, he uses a bamboo stick filled with boiled rice (tolakng tintikng). The captured soul is then massaged into the sick body part of the patient. To perform this ritual, a great number of traditional and institutionalized plants are essential. They are arranged around the altar (balai sianca jadi) and used for ritual objects. White rice and rice colored with black, red, yellow and green dyes plays an important role in attracting and satisfying the ghosts.
ETNOBIOLOGI KOTA AMLAPURA, KARANGASEM, BALI: AMLA, AMLAPURA DAN PHYLLANTHUS EMBLICA L. (PHYLLANTHACEAE) Keim, Ary Prihardhyanto; Adi, Tukul Rameyo; Nikmatullah, Muhamad; Arifa, Nissa; Akbar, Fauzi; Sujarwo, Wawan
Journal of Tropical Ethnobiology Vol. 3 No. 1 (2020): January 2020
Publisher : The Ethnobiological Society of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1387.952 KB) | DOI: 10.46359/jte.v3i1.9

Abstract

Amlapura is a Sanskrit name for the city of Karangasem and the result of the ethnobiological research conducted in this study indicates that it refers to a species of plant named Phyllanthus emblica (Phyllantaceae). In Indonesian, particularly Javanese the name is known as ?malaka?, ?mlaka?, ?kemloko?, or ?mloko?. This present ethnobiological study also raises a possibility that the name ?mlaka? is an indigenous Austronesian word instead and entered Sanskrit through Dravidian languages.
THE SECRET OF GENERATING THE LETHAL BLOWPIPE DART POISON IN BORNEO Zahorka, Herwig
Journal of Tropical Ethnobiology Vol. 2 No. 2 (2005): July 2005
Publisher : The Ethnobiological Society of Indonesia

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Abstract

The blowpipe dart poison in Borneo is generally generated from the latex of rhe large .Antians toxicana tree, Moraceae. This latex contains a variety of toxic chemical compounds. The principal toxic agent rs a steroid glycoside known as ~-Antiacin. A lethal dose (LSO) is only about 0.1 mg per kg weight of a warm-blooded animal. To dehydrate the milky latex into a paste, a long carefully implemented procedure is essential because that steroid glycoside compound is extremely heat-sensitive. Therefore, the blowpipe hunters perform the dehydration of the latex with the assistance of a young leaf from the small Liataia spinosa palm. The leaf is formed into boat-shape to hold the latex at a carefully determined distance over a small flame for about one week. This is feasible because the young Licuala leaf is astonishingly fireproof and durable. This is the secret of generating the lethal poison. If the latex were heated at coo high temperature, the glycoside compound would crack and the toxicity would be lost.
STUDIES ON CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT OF COASTAL RESOURCES THROUGH THE INTEGRATION OF SOCIAL, PHYSICAL AND BIOLOGICAL APPROACH: CASE STUDY IN PAOJEPE, WAJO, SOUTH SULAWESI Purwanto, Y.
Journal of Tropical Ethnobiology Vol. 2 No. 2 (2005): July 2005
Publisher : The Ethnobiological Society of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (4551.779 KB)

Abstract

This research is based upon an interdiciplinary field study encompassing anthropology, biology, and oceanography, conducted within a period of May 1999 to May 2001 at Paojepe coast, Wajo regency in South Sulawesi. The study has three main objectives : firstly, to identify social, cultural, ecological/biological and econo-demographic problems that concerned mangrove-forest conversion phenomenon into brackish water milkfish pond areas, as one of the main economic activities of the local people. Secondly, to identify achievements as well as failures in the efforts to rehabilitate mangrove forest by using of analyzing social, ecological and demographic symptoms and conditions at the coast of Paojepe. Thirdly, to identify the potentials of social institutions the people of Paojepe maintain, which was believed to be able to contribute as the means and medium in the efforts to apply the most suitable intervention strategies in coastal management, particularly intervention strategies in rehabilitation of the mangrove forests. The study on biological aspect has identified the biological diversity of Paojepe coast and also identified on the on-going ecosystem changes as consequences of mangrove depletion, coastal abrasion, and coral reef mining. The results of the oceanographic observation on Paojepe coast showed that, the sea currents That parallel the shore can move at speed of 62.64 cm/second and many transport suspended sediment and/or other materials from the coats heading offshore at a depth of 19 to 20 m, approximately 1333.4 m from the shore. The effect of rising and falling tide on coastal abrasion is followed by the presence of huge waves, especially at high tide. Coral reef has still been mined by the community. At a contour depth of about 4 meters, the reef could actually be a natural protector from the sea wave attacks on the eastern coast of Paojepe. The coral reef mining has resulted in their disappearance, sea waves hit the shore directly and frontally. The result of social study have tapped in aspirations of most of the local people, who have begun to be aware of the danger of abrasion on their locations, These people have begun to realize that abrasion can in fact pose serious threats to their economy, as more and more ponds located on the beach have been eroded. This means potential reduction on their milkfish and shrimp commodities. As have been empirically observed, owners of such ponds have strong. motivation in mangrove re-plantation. They have even more considered to plantation of Rhitopbora spp. on their ponds. The multidiciplinary approaches in the conservation and management will be discussed later in this paper.
POTENSI PENGEMBANGAN BUDIDAYA TAMBAK TRADISIONAL POTENSI PENGEMBANGAN BUDIDAYA TAMBAK TRADISIONAL DI DAERAH PESISIR PAOJEPE, KABUPATEN WAJO, SULAWESI SELATAN Widiyanto, Tri; Punvanto , Y.; Sudiono, Bambang T; Indanvati, Vidya
Journal of Tropical Ethnobiology Vol. 2 No. 2 (2005): July 2005
Publisher : The Ethnobiological Society of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (3506.284 KB)

Abstract

Study on potential development of fishpond (aquaculture fisheries) based on the condition of water quality in Paojepe coast, Wajo Regency, South Sulawesi was carried out in 1999 and 2000. This study aims in developing fishpond production in that area and improving the awareness of the farmers to avoid environmental destruction caused by quite high abration. The results show that the current fisheries system is a traditional system with very low productivity. The introduction of technology of water and sediment management can be done in order to increase fishpond productivity. Referring to some parameters of the water such as its physics, chemistry and biology, the area has a good potential to develop fishpon on "bandeng", whereas, to develop fishpond on shrimp, the area is not beneficial. Based on the water quality, semi-intensive aquaculture type suits the area.
STRUKTUR DAN KOMUNITAS TANAMAN PEKARANGAN DI DESA JABON MEKAR, KECAMATAN PARUNG, BOGOR Prasetyo, Budi; Setiadi, Dede; Walujo, Eko B.
Journal of Tropical Ethnobiology Vol. 2 No. 2 (2005): July 2005
Publisher : The Ethnobiological Society of Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (4186.84 KB)

Abstract

Jabon Mekar village is well-known as the central of fruit producing. Many kinds of fruit are planted and developed in this area. It is estimated as a buffer zone of Jakarta and subject of the urban development. The aim of the research is to study the community structure and vegetation profile of home-garden system in the village of jabon Mekar. The research was located at Jabon Mekar village, subdistrict of Parung, Bogor regency. The methods used for vegetation analysis were the quadrate method to find density, frequency, dominance, and important index value of plant species. The result of the research found 311 species of plants from 245 genus, 86 families and 36 cultivars. The plants were grouped into 6 categories i.e. the group of miscellaneous plants, ornamental plants, fruit plants, vegetable plants, tradionally medicinal plants, and food plants. The highest value of density of plant species for all group plants based on function found at the home-garden 400 m2 width types and then followed by home-garden of 1200 m2, 800 m2, and 2000 m2 width types. The all group of plants based on function in every types of widen home-garden have a tendency not to spread. The highest relative frequency was the group of fruit plants followed by the group of ornamental, miscellaneous, traditionally medicinal, vegetable and food plants. While the highest value of relative dominance is the group of miscellaneous plants, and then followed by ornamental plants, fruit plants, vegetable plants, tradionally medicinal plants, and food plants. The diversity of plant species at home-garden was at the high level. At the all of the widen homegarden type, the research noted that there were 57 species of fruit plants and dominated by Musa spp. It is also noted that 105 species of ornamental plants dominated by Acalypha sinensis, and in the 48 species of traditionally medicinal plants is dominated by _Ageratum houstonianum. While in the 15 species of vegetable plants is dominated by Gnaw& gaemon. And in the 7 rpecies of food plants is dominated Manihot eseulenta. Finally, in the 79 species of misceliadeous gro,ip of plants is dominated by Polytrias amaura.

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