cover
Contact Name
Wahid Yunianto
Contact Email
yunianto_wahid@yahoo.co.id
Phone
+6285643763865
Journal Mail Official
seamej@qitepinmath.org
Editorial Address
SEAMEO Regional Centre for QITEP in Mathematics Jl. Kaliurang Km 6, Sambisari, Condongcatur, Depok, Sleman Yogyakarta, Indonesia
Location
Kab. sleman,
Daerah istimewa yogyakarta
INDONESIA
Southeast Asian Mathematics Education Journal
ISSN : 20894716     EISSN : 27218546     DOI : https://doi.org/10.46517/seamej
Core Subject : Education,
The Journal invites original research articles and not simultaneously submitted to another journal or conference. The whole spectrum of research in mathematics education are welcome, which includes, but is not limited to the following topics: Realistic Mathematics Education Realistic Mathematics Education (RME) is a teaching and learning theory in mathematics education that was first introduced and developed by Freudenthal. There are two important points in RME; mathematics must be connected to reality and mathematics as a human activity. RME is implemented three principles, they are: (1) guided reinvention and progressive mathematizing, (2) didactical phenomenology, and (3) self-developed model. Furthermore, the practice of RME also has its own characteristics, they are: (1) phenomenological exploration or the use of contexts, (2) the use of models or bridging by vertical instruments, (3) the use of students own productions and constructions or students contribution, (4) the interactive character of the teaching process or interactivity, and (5) the intertwining of various learning strands. A paper is eligible to be included in this topic if the paper accommodates these three principles and these five characteristics. Joyful Learning in Mathematics Education The main goal of mathematics education in school is the mathematization of the child’s thought process through joyful learning. Learning should be something joyful because it is a perpetual growth process and self-reflection. Mathematics teachers are expected to develop ideas to motivate students by joyful activities, such as discovering, exploring, constructing, designing, setting strategy, and solving problems that are wrapped in mathematics games, puzzles, and hands-on activities. Integrating ICT in Mathematics Education The advance of information and communication technology (ICT) has been the concern of all human life, including in education. When all students use technology, education must be the first one to utilize it for the sake of effectiveness and attractiveness. The researches (ideas of research) on related topics could be traced to the works of Paul Drijvers, Willem J. Pelgrum, Tjeerd Plomp, Jean-Baptiste Lagrange, Michèle Artigue, Colette Laborde, Luc Trouche, and published books in Springer or other publishers. STEM Education Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) has been major topic of discussion in the field of education, due to the most esteemed fields to respond to the demand of 21st century. STEM education will be an important knowledge for teachers to educate future high-quality workforce. STEM education can be implemented in any level of education. The main principle of STEM education is Engineering Design Process (EDP). This principle consists of cyclic process: (1) Identifying problem, (2) Researching the problem, (3) Developing possible solutions, (4) Selecting promising solution, (5) Building the prototype, (6) Evaluating the prototype, (7) Redesigning. The idea research of STEM Education can be explored in Breiner, Harkness, Johnson, and Koehler; Sanders; and Bybee. Lesson Study Lesson Study is a well-known approach originated from Japan for action research in classroom by teachers. It is an effective model for teachers to join their activities to improve their teaching. This approach emphasizes the improvement of students’ mathematical thinking which involves three steps namely Plan-Do-See. The research (ideas of research) on related topics could be traced to the works of Fernandez and Yoshida, Lewis and Wang-Iverson and Yoshida. Teacher-made Mathematics Teaching Aids Students at times struggle with mathematics due to the abstract concepts involved. To help address this issue teachers can use physical objects, such as teaching aids, to make the concepts more relatable and understandable. It also provides opportunity for students to understand and internalize basic mathematial concepts through concrete objects and situations. A paper is eligible for this topic if it comprehensively explains the mathematics teaching aid made by the teachers and the learning opportunities offered to the students. Clinical Supervision Having strong educational leadership is known to be a major factor in improving student learning. By providing vision and development opportunities, educational leaders can help facilitate the conditions necessary for teachers to perform at their best. A good supervision involves activities that aids, directs and informs teachers of what should be done or have been done and not merely finding faults in the teachers’ teaching. A paper is eligible for inclusion in the clinical supervision if it provides a comprehensive description and analysis of every stage in the supervision process Differentiated Instruction Differentiated instruction is a teaching theory based on the premise that instructional approaches should vary and be adapted in relation to individual and diverse students in classrooms. Many classes consisting of students with diverse learning abilities require a teacher capable of designing teaching strategies that accommodate all learning styles. Therefore, the scope of differentiated instruction is an important part of the focus and scope of the journal. Teacher Professional Development Teacher professional development is defined as activities that develop an teacher’s skills, knowledge, expertise and other characteristics. The definition recognizes that development can be provided in many ways, ranging from the formal to the informal. It can be made available through external expertise in the form of courses, workshops or formal qualification programs, through collaboration between schools or teachers across schools (e.g. observational visits to other schools or teacher networks) or within the schools in which teachers work. In this last case, development can be provided through coaching/mentoring, collaborative planning and teaching, and the sharing of good practices. Classroom Action Research Classroom action research is a reflective process which helps teachers to explore and examine aspects of teaching and learning and to take action to change and improve. It begins with a question or questions about classroom experiences, issues, or challenges. Generally, classroom action research is consisting of 4 steps, namely, planning, action, observation, and reflection. Authors could submit their work, with a comprehensive description and analysis of every step.
Articles 69 Documents
THE EFFECTIVENESS OF WEB-BASED LEARNING MEDIA OF POLYHEDRAL FOR STUDENTS GRADE 8 Pebrianto, Pebrianto; Septia, Tika
Southeast Asian Mathematics Education Journal Vol 7, No 2 (2017)
Publisher : SEAMEO Regional Centre for QITEP in Mathematics

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (287.12 KB) | DOI: 10.46517/seamej.v7i2.58

Abstract

Students? difficulties in understanding polyhedral was one of the reasons for developing web-based learning media. This study is aimed at determining the effectiveness of webbased learning media for the students. The subjects of this study were students Grade 8 of SMPN 12 Mukomuko. An experimental method was adopted in this study and samples were divided into control and experimental groups. The control group was taught byconventional learning media while the experimental group was taught by web-based learning media. Pre-test and post-tests were administered to both groups. The findings showed that there is no significant mean difference between students? outcomes on the pretest and post-tests taught by conventional learning media, but there was a significant mean difference between the students? outcomes on the pre-test and post-tests taught with webbased learning media. The findings are encouraging and providing some promising directions, however, further study would be needed to determine if the results are due to the web-based approach or due to the teachers? enthusiasm, the novelty effect known as the Hawthorne Effect.
STEM OUTREACH VIA SCIENCE FORENSIC MODULE: THE IMPACT OF THE NEAR-PEER MENTORING APPROACH Azman, Hazeeq Hazwan; Maniyam, Maegala Nallapan; Ibrahim, Marini; Abdullah, Hasdianty; Hassan, Khairil Bariyyah; Kamaruddin, Hasnur Hidayah; Khalid, Rahayu Md.; Sout, Norhisyam Mat; Nawawi, Norazah Mohammad; Samah, Normawati@Nadzirah Abu; Alias, Rozila; Yaacob, Nor Suhaila; Yunus, Yusmi Mohd; Idris, Noraini
Southeast Asian Mathematics Education Journal Vol 9, No 1 (2019)
Publisher : SEAMEO Regional Centre for QITEP in Mathematics

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (332.818 KB) | DOI: 10.46517/seamej.v9i1.76

Abstract

STEM education emphasizes the integrated study of science passing the boundaries of traditionally labelled disciplines while demonstrating its application in real life. Science forensic is an eye-catching subject for students, which implements the knowledge of biology, physics, and chemistry. The purpose of this study was to identify students? interest towards STEM through science forensic module and the impact of the near-peer mentoring approach in the module for STEM outreach. This pilot study was conducted for the students of Sekolah Berasrama Penuh Integrasi (SBPI) Gombak with 36 participants. By using the Statistical Package for the Social Science (SPSS), the analysis revealed that 94.5% of students found the module interesting and 77% of participants agreeing that the module increased their interest to pursue their future study in the STEM-field. Focusing on demographics, this module received more positive responses from females and pure science stream students as compared to males and Islamic science stream, respectively. This result is consistent with the higher number of female students and pure science stream students in STEM-field study at university level. The near-peer mentoring approach showed a promising impact with 88% of students giving positive feedback on the credibility of mentors. The science forensic modules consisted of 8 main stations with the Fingerprinting station being the most popular (94.5%) and DNA profiling being the least popular (77.8%). One possible explanation of this is that the level of understanding for DNA profiling is harder with larger amounts of knowledge needed to be learned in a short period of time. Overall, the outcomes of this study suggest that exposing secondary school students to science forensic has a positive impact on their level of interest towards STEM education.
VARIATION OF TASKS AS A STRATEGY TO ENHANCE STUDENTS’ LEARNING OF ALGEBRA Fong, Ng Swee
Southeast Asian Mathematics Education Journal Vol 1, No 1 (2011)
Publisher : SEAMEO Regional Centre for QITEP in Mathematics

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (617.745 KB) | DOI: 10.46517/seamej.v1i1.10

Abstract

Algebra challenges students and teachers alike. Students find algebra abstract. In particular the structural conception of algebra confounds students. Why should the task: (a) simplify x2 + 3x + 2 be any different from; (b) solve x2 + 3x + 2 = 0? Despite their best efforts, teachers find that many students continue to solve task (a) when there is no reason for doing so. Research shows that these two tasks require students to have constructed different meanings of structure and meanings of letters for such algebraic objects. What does it mean to simplify and what does it mean to solve? What meanings do letters have in each of these cases? In this talk, I wish to share how simple yet innovative strategies could be used to help students discern one set of tasks from another. These strategies, underpinned by the theory of variation (Marton & Tsui, 2004) were tested out by teachers in Singapore. Their work showed that students improved in their performance with various types of algebra tasks. Students? improvements were reflected in terms of their capacity to justify their choices. 
MATHEMATICAL INVESTIGATION PROFICIENCY AMONG SINGAPORE SECONDARY SCHOOL STUDENTS: AN EXPLORATORY STUDY YEO, Joseph B. W.
Southeast Asian Mathematics Education Journal Vol 4, No 1 (2014)
Publisher : SEAMEO Regional Centre for QITEP in Mathematics

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (213.875 KB) | DOI: 10.46517/seamej.v4i1.26

Abstract

This article presents an exploratory study to find out whether high-ability secondary school students in Singapore were able to deal with open mathematical investigative tasks. A class of Secondary One (or Grade 7) students, who had no prior experience with this kind of investigation, were given a paper-and-pencil test consisting of four open tasks. The results show that these students did not even know how to begin, despite sample questions being given in the first two tasks to guide and help them pose their own problems. The main difficulty was the inability to understand the task requirement: what does it mean to investigate? Another issue was the difference between searching for any patterns without a specific problem to solve, and searching for patterns to solve a given problem. The implications of these findings on teaching and on research methodologies that rely on paper-and-pencil test instruments will also be discussed.
CHANGING THE ATTITUDES AND BELIEFS OF PRE-SERVICE PRIMARY TEACHERS TOWARDS MATHEMATICS Stoilescu, Dorian
Southeast Asian Mathematics Education Journal Vol 7, No 1 (2017)
Publisher : SEAMEO Regional Centre for QITEP in Mathematics

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (207.594 KB) | DOI: 10.46517/seamej.v7i1.42

Abstract

The importance of preparing primary educators capable of successfully teachingmathematics has been extensively emphasized in educational research. However, it is widely acknowledged that pre-service teachers in primary education start their career with poor attitudes and a great degree of anxiety towards mathematics. As such, primary education has been under severe criticism for not being able to provide their pre-service teachers with an adequate set of skills and attitudes towards mathematics. This paper discusses several cases and searches for possible explanations that are perpetuating this state. As well, this theoretical paper gives some recommendations for decreasing mathematics anxiety and improving mathematical knowledge for pre-service teachers in primary education.
FRAGMENTATION OF THE THINKING STRUCTURE OF TRANSLATION IN SOLVING MATHEMATICAL MODELLING PROBLEMS Wibawa, Kadek Adi
Southeast Asian Mathematics Education Journal Vol 9, No 1 (2019)
Publisher : SEAMEO Regional Centre for QITEP in Mathematics

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1000.171 KB) | DOI: 10.46517/seamej.v9i1.71

Abstract

Fragmentation of the thinking structure is the process of construction of information in the brain that is inefficient, incomplete, and not interconnected, and hinders the process of mathematical problem solving. In solving mathematical modeling problems, students need to do translation thinking which is useful for changing the initial representation (source representation) into a new representation (target representation). This study aims to discover how the occurrence of the fragmentation of the thinking structure of translation within students in their solving of mathematical modeling problems. The method used is descriptive qualitative with the instrument in the form of one question for the mathematical modeling of necklace pendants and semi-structured interview sheets. The results showed that there were three errors that occurred in solving mathematical modeling problems. First, the error in changing a verbal representation to a graph. Secondly, errors in changing a graphical representation to symbols (algebraic form). Thirdly, errors in changing graphical representation and symbols into mathematical models. The three errors that occur are described based on the four categories of Bosse frameworks (Bosse, et al., 2014), namely: (1) unpacking the source (UtS), (2) preliminary coordination (PC), (3) constructing the target (CtT), and (4) determining equivalence (DE). In this study, there were 3 subjects who experienced fragmentation of the thinking structure in solving mathematical modeling problems. One of the highlights is the fragmentation of the structure of translation thinking often starts from the process of unpacking of the source due to the incompleteness of considering all the available source details.
JOYFUL AND MEANINGFUL LEARNING IN MATHEMATICS CLASSROOM THROUGH INTERNET ACTIVITIES Patahuddin, Sitti Maesuri
Southeast Asian Mathematics Education Journal Vol 3, No 1 (2013)
Publisher : SEAMEO Regional Centre for QITEP in Mathematics

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (459.4 KB) | DOI: 10.46517/seamej.v3i1.21

Abstract

This paper arises from the author experiences over the last eight years with regards to investigating how the Internet could be used as a tool for mathematics learning, mathematics teaching as well as for professional development. This paper illustrates three main categories of the potential of the Internet for learning: the Internet for information, the Internet for communication, the Internet for collaboration, followed by a description on how the use of the Internet could make learning mathematics interesting and meaningfully. Lastly, through the use of a case study and my experiences working with group of students using the Internet, I argue that the success of integrating the Internet into mathematics teaching and learning depends very much on teachers? knowledge and their philosophical beliefs about learning and teaching, learners, mathematics, and technology.
INCULCATING TSUNAMI AWARENESS IN A MATHEMATICS LESSON: IMPROVING STUDENTS’ COLLABORATIVE PROBLEM SOLVING VIA LESSON STUDY Khalid, Madihah; Ali, Dk Haslinah Pg. Haji
Southeast Asian Mathematics Education Journal Vol 6, No 1 (2016)
Publisher : SEAMEO Regional Centre for QITEP in Mathematics

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (261.157 KB) | DOI: 10.46517/seamej.v6i1.37

Abstract

The past two cycles of PISA have reflected the demands of the skills and competencies that many countries desire their future generations to possess. Among these competencies, students? financial literacy, problem solving, and communication skills have emerged to be as important as their reading and quantitative literacy (OECD, 2013). Problem-solving, along with other 21st century skills can be inculcated in the students by using the problem-solvingpedagogy. However, teachers who are not used to teaching mathematics via problem solving need to experience the pedagogy themselves and this can be best achieved by implementing Lesson Study. A Lesson Study research study was conducted to look at collaborative problem solving in the teaching of the topic on ?rate? to year 5 students. Results showed that students benefited from their lesson in terms of increased knowledge of the problem context and theability to apply knowledge of rates in finding the best solution that the problem posed. Consequently, Lesson Study was found to help enhance teachers? pedagogical content knowledge. It helped them produce effective lesson plans that incorporated student-centred authentic lessons that also integrated values, use of technology and students? creativity in problem solving.
THE ETHNOMATHEMATICS OF CALCULATING AUSPICIOUS DAYS IN JAVANESE SOCIETY AS MATHEMATICS LEARNING Imswatama, Aritsya; Setiadi, David
Southeast Asian Mathematics Education Journal Vol 7, No 2 (2017)
Publisher : SEAMEO Regional Centre for QITEP in Mathematics

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (287.736 KB) | DOI: 10.46517/seamej.v7i2.53

Abstract

The purpose of this ethnomatematics research is to describe the process of calculating auspicious days for Javanese wedding in Purworejo. This research is a descriptive research with a qualitative approach which used interviews to collect the data. The subject of this research was an individual who implemented the process of calculating auspicious days in Javanese society. The results show that the process of calculating auspicious days for Javanese wedding in Purworejo was an activity that could be possibly used as mathematics learning.
THE IMPLEMENTATION OF TPACK (TECHNOLOGY, PEDAGOGY, AND CONTENT KNOWLEDGE) FRAMEWORK ON INDONESIAN ONLINE MATHEMATICS TEACHERS TRAINING Rohmitawati, Rohmitawati
Southeast Asian Mathematics Education Journal Vol 8, No 1 (2018)
Publisher : SEAMEO Regional Centre for QITEP in Mathematics

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (342.02 KB) | DOI: 10.46517/seamej.v8i1.64

Abstract

This study aimed to describe how the implementation of the TPACK (Technology, Pedagogy, and Content Knowledge) framework used for online mathematics teacher training, and to observe participants? response of the course. This research was a case study of online training for 30 Indonesian junior secondary school mathematics teachers on a quadrilateral course developed using the TPACK framework. The TPACK framework provides a map for understanding how to effectively integrate technology and instructional strategies into the content. The finding of this study for the teachers in the sample were: (1) The TPACK framework was implemented interactively in the integration process of GeoGebra (technology) using discovery learning strategies (pedagogy) on the square area formula (content) for quadrilateral properties; (2) The use of the TPACK framework on the online course received positive responses from teachers in the sample and they stated that it would be interesting and helpful when used in the classroom.