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HAYATI Journal of Biosciences
ISSN : 19783019     EISSN : -     DOI : -
HAYATI Journal of Biosciences (HAYATI J Biosci) publishes articles and short communication in tropical bioscience fields such as development, biotechnology, biodiversity and environmental issues. HAYATI J Biosci covers wide range of all life forms topics including virus, microbes, fungi, plants, animal and human. HAYATI J Biosci has been also indexed/registered in Crossref, DOAJ, CABI, EBSCO, Agricola and ProQuest.
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Articles 493 Documents
Bioactive Compound from Extract Filtrat Streptomyces sp.Sp1. as Biocontrol of Vibriosis on Larvae of Macrobrachium rosenbergii shrimps Kawuri, Retno; Darmayasa, IBG
HAYATI Journal of Biosciences Vol. 26 No. 1 (2019): January 2019
Publisher : Bogor Agricultural University, Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (913.24 KB) | DOI: 10.4308/hjb.26.1.15

Abstract

  Production of Macrobrachium rosenbergii shrimp was limited by vibriosis disease. Streptomyces can be used as an alternative control of vibriosis which is caused by Vibrio anguillarum. Aplication of Streptomyces sp.1 culture could give significant different impacts (p<0.05) on the percentage of survival (SR) of shrimp larvae that had been infected by V. anguillarum compared to the control. This study was conducted to identify and determine bioactive compound of Streptomyces sp.1. The presence of bioactive compound was confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. Identification of Streptomyces sp.1 by 16S rRNA partial gene sequencing method. Streptomyces sp.1 was identified to be Streptomyces sp.Sp1. There were 35 chemical compounds identified, the chemical compounds which have antimicrobial properties identified in the n butanol extract of Streptomyces sp.Sp1 are 3-Hexanone, 2-methyl (43%), n Butyl ether (19%) Nonane (CAS) n-Nonane (5.6%), Decane (CAS) n-Decane (3.2%), Hexacosane (CAS) n-Hexacosane (1.9%), Tetracontane (1.3%), Heneicosane (1.9%), Hexadeconoic acid, methyl ester (0.3%), Butane,1,1-dibutoxy (0.3%), and Limonene (0.3%). Benzeneacetic acid, 3-methoxy-.alpha.,4-bis[(tri (0.3%). These results suggested that Streptomyces sp.Sp1 had good general antimicroba activity and might have potential biocontrol antagonist Vibrio anguillarum.
Identification of Banana Plants from Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) Photos Using Object Based Image Analysis (OBIA) Method (A Case Study in Sayang Village, Jatinangor District, West Java) Harto, Agung Budi; Prastiwi, Prila Ayu Dwi; Ariadji, Farah Nafisa; Suwardhi, Deni; Dwivany, Fenny M.; Nuarsa, I Wayan; Wikantika, Ketut
HAYATI Journal of Biosciences Vol. 26 No. 1 (2019): January 2019
Publisher : Bogor Agricultural University, Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (2031.03 KB) | DOI: 10.4308/hjb.26.1.7

Abstract

  Banana is one of the leading fruit commodities of Indonesia and ranks the sixth position as one of the largest banana producers in the world. There are more than 200 types of banana in Indonesia. The utilization of bananas is influenced by the local culture, where in every 10 horticultural households, 5 of them plant bananas both as garden plants or field plants. This horticultural crop is expectantly being one of the actions to improve economic prosperity especially in rural areas. In maintaining the diversity of the growing bananas in rural areas, a geospatial approach to identify the vegetation is required. Remote sensing technology is one of the solutions to observe and to develop banana plants with one of the methods namely Object Based Image Analysis (OBIA). This method consists of segmentation, classification, and validation. In classification process, the OBIA method distinguishes objects not only based on pixel values but also on the basis of the shape, area, and texture around them. This research has proven that the classification using OBIA method is better than the traditional classification such as maximum likelihood classification method to identify banana plants. OBIA method can quickly identifies the vegetation and non-vegetation, also the regular plants and banana plants.
Behavior, Histopathology and Physiological Responses of Rat Fed Diets Containing Growth Hormone Transgenic Fish Meal Alimuddin, Alimuddin; Murtini, Sri; Faridah, Nurly; Nuryati, Sri
HAYATI Journal of Biosciences Vol. 26 No. 1 (2019): January 2019
Publisher : Bogor Agricultural University, Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (577.678 KB) | DOI: 10.4308/hjb.26.1.1

Abstract

  The animal model response against genetically modified product may provide food safety information. This study was performed to observe behavior, histopathology and physiological responses of Wistar rat fed on the diet containing growth hormone (GH) transgenic common carp (Cyprinus carpio) meal (Ccm). Thirty rats of three-month-old (BW: 115.67–139.50g) were divided into five treatments (six rats per treatment). The treatments were rats fed on the commercial diet without Ccm (control), a re-pelleted diet containing 15% (NT-15) and 45% non-transgenic Ccm (NT-45), a re-pelleted diet containing 15% (TG-15) and 45% GH transgenic Ccm (TG-45). Rats were kept for three weeks, fed twice a day according to treatment by 30 g/day/rat and water was provided ad-libitum. Rat behavior was observed every day during feeding. Serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (SGOT), serum glutamic pyvuric transaminase (SGPT), urea, and creatinine were measured at initial and the end of the experiment. Histology observation was made for liver, kidney, and brain tissues. Our results showed that behavior, histopathology, SGOT, SGPT, urea and creatinine levels of rat fed with control, NT- and TG-Ccm diets were similar. All rats survived until the end of the experiment. Thus, within the dose level of this study, GH transgenic Ccm showed no toxicity or effect on behavior and physiology of Wistar rats.
DNA Barcode of Seven Indonesian Hornbills Species (Aves: Bucerotidae) Based on Mitochondrial DNA Cytochrome Oxidase Subunit I Jarulis, Jarulis; Solihin, Dedy Duryadi; Mardiastuti, Ani; Prasetyo, Lilik Budi
HAYATI Journal of Biosciences Vol. 25 No. 4 (2018): October 2018
Publisher : Bogor Agricultural University, Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (532.707 KB) | DOI: 10.4308/hjb.25.4.178

Abstract

DNA barcoding based on mitochondrial DNA COI gene is very useful in identifying of Indonesian hornbill. We sequenced the DNA barcode of seven hornbill species using the mitochondrial DNA COI gene to explore their genetic variation, identity, distance, and phylogenetic. Thirty-one blood samples from seven hornbill species were isolated and analyzed. Slight variation was observed within the nucleotide of the hornbill species. In contrary, fairly significant difference was shown within the genus and family level. COI gene sequences generated from this study, showed unmatched result with BoLD System database. These seven Indonesian hornbill species were then divided into two groups, namely Group I consisting of Aceros cassidix, Rhyticeros plicatus, R. undulatus, Buceros rhinoceros, and B. bicornis, while Group II occupied by Anthracoceros albirostris and A. malayanus; both groups with genetic distance 5.90%. Overall in-group had 9.40% distances to the hornbill used as the out group. COI sequence gene from these seven hornbill species are novel for identifying Indonesian hornbills. We encourage its use as quick species identification, applied to prevent illegal poaching conservation management.
Distribution of Ammonium-Oxidizing Bacteria in Sediment with Relation to Water Quality at the Musi River, Indonesia Melki, Melki; Isnansetyo, Alim; Widada, Jaka; Murwantoko, Murwantoko
HAYATI Journal of Biosciences Vol. 25 No. 4 (2018): October 2018
Publisher : Bogor Agricultural University, Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (478.826 KB) | DOI: 10.4308/hjb.25.4.198

Abstract

The Musi River is located in the southern Sumatra, Indonesia. Most of activities, i.e. agricultural, industrial, and urban activities are considered as being major sources of chemicals and nutrients with their waste products effluent into the river. Nitrification, the microbial oxidation of ammonia to nitrite and nitrate, occurs in a wide variety of environments and naturally remove anthropogenic N pollution. The purpose of this research was to determine of distribution of ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in sediment with relation to water quality at the Musi river area. This study was conducted on rainy and dry season 2016 at five sampling sites from the freshwater to seawater at high and low tide conditions, the sampling sites are station St1 (Gandus), station St2 (Palembang city), station St3 (Upang), station St4 (Sungsang), and station St5 (Sea). Sediment samples were collected from the surface layer by using an Ekman grab. Some water quality such as salinity, temperature, pH, and dissolved oxygen (DO) were directly analyzed in the field, while other water quality such as NH4-N, NO2-N, and NO3-N were analyzed in the laboratory. The Density of AOB was determined by the most probable number of (MPN) method. The PCA was used to correlate variations of the AOB with physicochemical properties using software Xlstat. The results showed that the physicochemical properties had a range of salinity of 0 to 20 ppt, temperature of 29.21 to 31.82oC, pH of 4.88 to 7.93, DO of 3.44 to 11.33 mg/l, NH4-N in sediment of 0.04 to 0.87 mg/l, NO2-N in sediment of 0.01 to 1.77 mg/l, NO3-N in sediment of 0.09 to 2.08 mg/l. The density of AOB ranged from 7.2 x 102 to 6.1 x 103 cells/g sediment. Principal component analyses showed that temperature, pH, DO, and concentrations of nutrient contributed to density of AOB.
The Side Effect of the Melastoma malabathricum L Ethanol Extract on the Gonad Maturation of Female Orange Mud Crab (Scylla olivacea) Farizah, Nuril; Zairin JR, Muhammad; Darusman, Latifah Kosim; Boediono, Arief; Suprayudi, Muhammad Agus
HAYATI Journal of Biosciences Vol. 25 No. 4 (2018): October 2018
Publisher : Bogor Agricultural University, Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (944.578 KB) | DOI: 10.4308/hjb.25.4.188

Abstract

The medicinal plants in aquaculture are currently being studied quite extensively by researchers. Medicinal plants can act as an inducer or aphrodisiac and an antifertility agent in gonad maturation. The aimed of the experiment was to known side effects of the herb M. malabathricum L. on maturation process in female mud crab (S. olivacea). This study used 40 crabs with an average weight of 200-250g. The experiment consists of two treatment groups. The controls group (A) that received 100 μl of aquadest and group treatment (B) received 100 μl of 2 mg/g of ethanol extract M. malabathricum L. were studied. For 5, 10, 15, and 20 days of experiment, crabs were anesthetized and sacrified. The ovary was collect for GSI and histology. The end of experiment days (20 day), the hemolymph was collect to used ELISA assay. The result showed, significant differences in treatment group and control groups (p<0.05) in terms the macroscopic morphology of ovary, the mean GSI and the diameter of oocytes. Histological showed the influence of extract M. malabathricum L. on inhibited the ovary development compared with the control groups. Based on this results, it is concluded that ethanol extract of M. malabathricum L. leaves at a dose of 2 mg/g act as an antifertility agent for ovary maturation of S. olivacea.
Population Growth Models of Forest Trees for Conservation Management: Case of Teak (Tectona Grandis) Forest in Begal, East Java, Indonesia Sumarti, Novriana; Wardana, Mharta A.; Nuraini, Nuning
HAYATI Journal of Biosciences Vol. 25 No. 4 (2018): October 2018
Publisher : Bogor Agricultural University, Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (795.404 KB) | DOI: 10.4308/hjb.25.4.169

Abstract

Based on 2010 FAO report, teak forest and plantation in Indonesia covers 1,269 million hectares or 7 per mill of total area of Indonesia. It can be found dominantly in Central and East Java. PT Perhutani, Indonesia has responsible for management of the government owned forests in the islands of Java and Madura. Based on 2007 data, the teak wood production is 517,627 m3 and the highest percentage, which is 37% of total production, is coming from East Java. In this paper, we develop growth population models using Leslie Matrix and Markov Chain in order to predict the future condition based on the current condition. The models are implemented into data from Teak Forest in Begal, East Java, that covers 2,052.8 hectares and consists of 114 sites. The result from the first model using Leslie Matrix shows that it needs 16 years from year 2011 that the sustainable condition of the forest can be achieved. The result from the implementation of the second model using Markov Chain into the existing data shows that the condition of the teak forest can be classified as quite critical because the good condition part based on its density of the early age group (0 - 4 years) has potential to become the worst condition before its harvest time.
Antidiabetic Activity of Zingiber officinale Roscoe Rhizome Extract: an In Vitro Study Noipha, Kusumarn; Ninla-Aesong, Putrada
HAYATI Journal of Biosciences Vol. 25 No. 4 (2018): October 2018
Publisher : Bogor Agricultural University, Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (842.764 KB) | DOI: 10.4308/hjb.25.4.160

Abstract

  The potential roles of Zingiber officinale Roscoe (ginger) for treating and preventing diabetes have been investigated in both humans and experimental animals. However, the mode of its action has not yet been elucidated. This study aimed to investigate the effects of ginger extract on glucose uptake activity and its activation pathway in L6 myotubes. Cells were co-cultured for 24 h with a variable concentration of either ginger extract or 2 mM metformin or 200 nM insulin or 20 μM Troglitazone (TGZ), followed by a 10-min 2-[3H]-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) uptake. The levels of glucose transporters 1 (GLUT1) and GLUT4 protein and mRNA expression were determined. Ginger extract at 400 μg/ml significantly enhanced glucose uptake in L6 myotubes (208.03 ± 10.65% above basal value, p<0.05) after co-culture for 24 h. The ginger-enhancement of glucose uptake was inhibited by 3.5 μM cycloheximide, a protein synthesis inhibitor, 1 μM wortmannin (Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase (PI3 kinase) inhibitor) and 15 nM rapamycin (mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor). The enhancement of glucose transport by ginger extract at 400 μg/ml was accompanied with the increased expression of GLUT1 protein (1.60 ± 0.20, 2.03 ± 0.19, and 2.25 ± 0.35 folds of basal at 4, 8, and 24 h, respectively p<0.05) and mRNA (1.22 ± 0.96, 1.45 ± 0.93, 1.91 ± 0.75, 2.32±0.92, and 2.20 ± 0.64 folds of basal at 1, 2, 4, 8, and 24 h, respectively p<0.05) in a time-dependent manner. Z. officinale Roscoe rhizome extract increase glucose transport activity of L6 myotubes by enhancing GLUT1 expression, the results of PI3-Kinase and 5’-AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) stimulation.
Biofungicide Producing Bacteria: an In Vitro Inhibitor of Ganoderma boninense Irma, Ade; Meryandini, Anja; Rupaedah, Bedah
HAYATI Journal of Biosciences Vol. 25 No. 4 (2018): October 2018
Publisher : Bogor Agricultural University, Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (499.654 KB) | DOI: 10.4308/hjb.25.4.151

Abstract

Oil palm is widely known as one of vegetable oil sources and the main comodity in Indonesian agriculture because of the benefits in non-food and food industries. Ganoderma boninense attack results in considerable losses to agriculture. Chemical control creates a harmful effect on health and the environment. Biocontrol is required to take over the function of chemical control. This study aimed to select bacteria that produce bioactive compounds as biofungicide against G. boninense pathogenic fungi and identify bacteria producing biofungicide using molecular method. The stages of bacterial isolate selection were performed through the selected hemolysis and isolate tests in the antagonistic test. Bacteria were extracted using ethyl acetate and their extract activity were tested. Analysis of bioactive compounds was conducted using thin layer chromatography (TLC) and the identification was based on 16S rRNA gene. The result of bacterial pathogenic test was obtained from two selected bacterial isolates namely 11B LB and 11B MD. Both bacterial isolates showed antagonistic effects by forming an inhibitory zone against G. boninense growth with percentage of inhibitor of 81 and 75%. Activity test of bacterial extract showed that crude extract of bacterial isolate 11B MD had the highest inhibitor activity that is 88.34%. TLC analysis proved that the active extract of bacteria containing metabolite compounds had Rf value of 0.1, 0.28, and 0.38. Isolate bacteria 11B MD was identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa.
An Inventory of Chiropteran Fauna in Bhubaneswar City, Eastern India Debata, Subrat; Palita, Sharat Kumar
HAYATI Journal of Biosciences Vol. 25 No. 3 (2018): July 2018
Publisher : Bogor Agricultural University, Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (2045.969 KB) | DOI: 10.4308/hjb.25.3.144

Abstract

An inventory of chiropteran fauna was carried out in Bhubaneswar city, Odisha, eastern India during October 2015 and March 2016 following roost survey and mist net survey techniques. During the study a total 19 species of bats belonging to seven families including the nationally threatened Rhinolophus rouxii were recorded of which family Vespertilionidae was the most diverse one, represented by five species. Majority of 11 species are found roosting and breeding in old temples and caves and are vulnerable from renovation activities, persecution and tourism. Therefore, long term monitoring of these sites are essential to understand the population trend over time and derive appropriate conservation implications.

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