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Articles 7 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 39, No 04 (2007)" : 7 Documents clear
Preliminary study on congenital anomaly in DR. Sardjito General Hospital Yogyakarta Romi, M. Mansyur
Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala Ilmu Kedokteran) Vol 39, No 04 (2007)
Publisher : Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala Ilmu Kedokteran)

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Abstract

Background: Congenital anomalies and genetic diseases tend to increase and dominate hospital admittance,especially in the pediatric wards in developed countries. The spectrum of diseases in regions with lowinfant mortality rate is likely to go with such tendency It is necessary to study congenital anomalies andgenetic diseases at Dr. Sardjito General Hospital, locating in a region with much lower infant mortalityrate than that of the national average.Objective: To know the occurrence of congenital anomalies and its pattern among DR. Sardjito GeneralHospital in-patients.Method: An desricptive study was done on secondary data taken from data-base of the Hospital in 1998 –2002 period. All of admittances in that period diagnosed as primary or secondary diagnosis, with Q00 –Q99 congenital malformations, deformations, and chromosomal abnormalities according to InternationalClassisifaction of Diseases (ICD), were included. The pattern of anomaly at the Hospital was compared tothat of different population and period.Results: There were 1968 1070 males and 898 females) admittances with congenital anomalies at Dr.Sardjito General Hospital in 1998 – 2002. The proportion compared to the whole admittance was 2.06%.The most prevalent was Q35 – Q37 cleft lip and cleft palate (21.14%), followed by Q38 – Q45 othercongenital malformations of the digestive system (18.45%), Q20 – Q28 malformations of the circulatorysystem (15.65%), Q50 – Q56 malformations of genital organs (12,55%), Q00 – Q07 malformations ofthe nervous system (11.89%), Q65-Q79: malformations nd deformations of musculoskeletal system(6.40%), Q80-Q89: other congenital malformations (4.06%), Q10-Q18: malformations of eye, ear, faceand neck (3,91%), Q60-Q64: malformations of the urinary system (2.54%), Q90-Q99: Chromosomalanomalies (2,44%), and Q30-Q34: malformations of the respiratory system (0.97%).Conclusion: Congenital anomalies at Dr. Sardjito General Hospital were dominated by cleft lip and palate,and other congenital malformations of the digestive system. The pattern was similar to that of otherregions of Indonesia, and differed from Indian and European populationsKey words: congenital anomalies – genetic diseases – malformations – Dr. Sardjito General Hospital
The therapeutic effect of citrus aurantifolia swingle in idiopathic hypocitraturic calcium nephrolithiasis Raja Pingkir Sidabutar, Djoko Rahardjo, Mochammad Sja’bani, Mohammad Ismadi, Siti Dawiesah Ismi
Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala Ilmu Kedokteran) Vol 39, No 04 (2007)
Publisher : Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala Ilmu Kedokteran)

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Abstract

Background: Hypocitraturia is one of the main risks of stone appearance or renal stone recurrence that iseasily interfered. A sphere citrus fruit (Citrus aurantifolia Swingle) was reported to contain the highestcitrate compared to other citrus fruits.Aims: We aimed to determine the effect of Citrus aurantifolia Swingle on the management of hypocitraturia,compared with potassium citrate.Materials and Methods: Seventy two patients with idiopathic calcium renal stone with hypocitraturia wererandomly divided into two groups, therapy and placebo groups. The first group was given potassium citratetreatment (2x20 mEq/day), while the second one was given 2x1.5-g pure lactose. After 6 months,patients without stomachache complaints were given 40ml citrus juice diluted in 2 glasses of water, takenimmediately after dinner for 10 days. Observation was done on risk factors in urine collected for 8, 16 and24-hours, including volume, pH, potassium, magnesium, oxalate, citrate, calcium, sodium, phosphate,sulphate, uric acid, ureum and creatinine. The setting of this study was 1 hospital in Yogyakarta and 2hospitals in Jakarta.Results: The increase of urine volume, pH, level and total citrate value, level and total potassium, and thedecrease of calcium ratio to citrate urine. The changes of those metabolite levels could lessen the chanceof colic and hematuria complaints, as seen after 6 months administation of potassium citrate. Similarresults were obtained from the administration of citrus juice, except for calcium level, which was notdecreased.Conclusion: The administration of potassium citrate 2x20mEq/day in 6 months improved patient’s complaintsand occurrence of renal colic, while consumption of Citrus aurantifolia Swingle in idiopathic calcium renalstone with hypocitraturia was concluded to increase the urine volume, pH level and total citrate value,level and total potassium, and the decrease of calcium ratio to urine citrate.Key word: renal stone- hypocitraturia- Citrus aurantifolia Swingle
Physical status and motor performance of junior high school children age of 12-15 years in rural and urban Bantul Yogyakarta Hastuti, Janatin
Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala Ilmu Kedokteran) Vol 39, No 04 (2007)
Publisher : Universitas Gadjah Mada

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Abstract

Background: Physical status and motor performance are influenced by living conditions. Those parametersare believed as factors indicated socioeconomics level of a population which effect on the children growth.Growth is also affected by other factors such as nutrition, genetics, hormone, disease, physical activity,environmental stress, and lifestyle. During growth, children adapt to their environment to achieve optimalfunctional efficiency.Objective: The aim of this research is to investigate physical status and motor performance of junior highschool children age of 12-15 years in Bantul Regency Yogyakarta Province, whether it is differ betweenrural and urban and between boys and girls.Methods: The research was done on 481 junior high school students of 12-15 years old, boys and girls,which consisted of 247 children living in District of Kretek (rural area) and 234 children living in Districtof Bantul (urban area). All subjects were measured on weight, height, upper arm girth, and skinfoldthickness of triceps. Physical status was determined from height, weight, body mass index, and musclearea of upper arm. Motor performance was measured on grip strength (left and right), jumping (standinglong jump method), throwing, and running tasks. Statistical analyses of chi-square, Pearson correlation,and linear regression were performed on data of physical status and motor performance of the children.Results: The results indicate that boys in both areas up to 14 years were lighter than the girls, but heavierat age of 15. However, boys were taller than the girls in all ages instead of rural boys at age of 12-13years. Body mass index and muscle area of upper arm of girls in both areas were greater than of boysexcept urban boys at age of 15 years. Boys appeared better in all motor performance tasks than the girlsas well as in motor performance relative to weight and height. Differences between rural and urban showthat urban children were taller and heavier than those were in rural. Body mass index and muscle area ofupper arms were greater in urban children. Children in urban area were also stronger in grip strength (leftand right). However, rural children were farther in jumping and throwing, and faster in running task..Conclusions: In conclusions, urban children were better in physical status and grips strength, while ruralchildren were better in jumping, throwing, and running performances. Instead of grips strength, motorperformances relative to weight and height of rural children were better than those of urban. Boys havebetter motor performance and motor performance relative to weight and height than girls.Key words: physical status; motor performance; rural and urban children.
Somatotypes of children in different areas of Indonesia Ashizawa K, Rahmawati NT Hastuti J, Yevita N
Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala Ilmu Kedokteran) Vol 39, No 04 (2007)
Publisher : Universitas Gadjah Mada

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Abstract

Background: Human populations consist of individuals who differ widely in body shape and size. Somatotypesare morpho-phenotypic ranges along continua of variation, which possess constantly recognizablecharacteristics and are the functional end products of the whole genetic and the developmental complex.Objective: The objective of this cross-sectional study was to establish the somatotypes of urban, agriculturaland fishing village children in Indonesia.Method: Anthropometric somatotypes of children are considered in a cross-sectional sample of schoolgoing,ranging in age from 7-15 years. A total numbers 1716 (816 boys and 900 girls) consist of childrenin urban Yogyakarta (340 boys and 371 girls), agricultural Bantul (222 boys and 243 girls), and fishingPadang (254 boys and 286 girls). Heath-Carter somatotypes were determined for all subjects.Result: The Yogyakarta children were taller and heavier than their agricultural and fishing counterparts inboth sexes. The Yogyakarta children (urban) were more endomorphic, mesomorphic, and less ectomorphicthan the Bantul and Padang children. The Padang children (fishing village) were more ectomorphic and lessendomorphic than the Yogyakarta and Bantul children. The mean somatotype of boys and girls were 3.8 –3.6 – 3.7 and 4.2 – 3.1 – 3.6 (in urban city, respectively), 2.8 – 3.2 – 4.1 and 3.5 – 2.9 – 3.9 (in anagricultural village, respectively), and 2.5 – 3.5 – 3.8 and 3.5 – 3.1 – 3.5 (in fishing village, respectively).Conclusion: The finding indicated among the Indonesian children, the distribution of somatotype accordingto age was different between urban Yogyakarta, agricultural Bantul and fishing Padang. In general, thewell-off children were more endomorphic, and the low-income children were more ectomorphic.Key words: somatotype anthropometric – urban, agricultural, and fishing village children
Effectiveness of subconjunctival mitomycin-C compared with subconjunctival triamcinolon acetonide on the recurrence of progresive primary pterygium which underwent Mc Reynolds method Angela Nurini Agni, Donny W Chandra Agus Supartoto,
Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala Ilmu Kedokteran) Vol 39, No 04 (2007)
Publisher : Universitas Gadjah Mada

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Background: The main problem in the management of pterygium is how to diminish the recurrence rateafter surgical treatment. Mitomycin-C an antineoplastic, antifibrotic has been used to prevent recurrencerate of pterygium after excision, however, it correlated with some complications. Subconjunctivaladministration before excision has been proposed to avoid them.Objective: To know the effectivity of subconjunctival of mitomycin-C to decrease the recurrence rate ofprogresive primary pterigyum after Mc Reynold method compared with subconjunctival triamcinolonacetonide.Materials and methods: Randomized clinical trial of 41 progresive primary pterygium in Dr Sardjito Hospitaland Dr Yap Eye Hospital. They were randomly assigned to receive subconjunctival 0.1 ml triamcinolonacetonide or 0.1 ml mitomycin-C and underwent pterygium excision one week later using Mc Reynoldmethod. The follow up period was 6 months to detect any recurrence and complication of the drugsResults: The recurrence rate after subconjunctival mitomycin-C and triamcinolon acetonide was 4.7% and25%, respectively, however the different was not statistically significant (p=0.67). There were nostatistical difference in conjunctival hiperemia, lacrimation and granulation. Blepharospasm was significantlydifferent in seven days. The pain after injection and after excision was statistically different between twotwo groups.Conclusion: The recurrence rate of progressive primary pterygium in triamcinolon acetonide group washigher than mitomycin-C group but there was no statistical difference.Key words : Progressive primary pterygium – mitomycin-C – triamcinolon acetonide – Mc Reynold method
The effect of cyperus rotundus root ethanol extract on the epithelization in the healing process on skin excision wound Harijadi, Ch. Tri Nuryana E. Suryadi
Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala Ilmu Kedokteran) Vol 39, No 04 (2007)
Publisher : Universitas Gadjah Mada

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Ch. Tri Nuryana, E. Suryadi & Harijadi - The Influence of Ethanol Extract of Purple Nutsedge (Cyperusrotundus) on Epithelization of Skin Wound Healing ProcessBackground: If skin is wounded, epithelial cells will migrate to the wound area in order to keep homeostatic.Epithelization consists of mitotic and proliferation of epithelial cells. Rhizome of purple nutsedge (Cyperusrotundus) contains cyperene, flavonoid, ²-sitosterol dan ascorbic acid that can accelerate epithelization inwound healing process and has been used in traditional medicine.Objective: To investigate the influence of ethanol extract of Purple Nutsedge (Cyperus rotundus) inepithelization of wound healing process.Methods: Fourty five Balb/c male mice 8-10 weeks old, 25-35 g weight, were excised punch biopsy onback 0.5 cm right and left of columna vertebralis, 2.5 cm in cutis from the ear area. The mice weredivided into 5 groups. Negative control group was treated with vehicle of extract, positive control groupwas treated by gel containing placenta extract 1% & neomycin sulfate 0.5% and the others were treatedwith C. rotundus 1%, 2%, and 4% in concentration. Each of the groups was divided into 3 subgroups.Each of the subgroups composed of 3 mice based on the period of termination, i.e.: 3rd, 7th and 12th dayafter wounded. Histological evaluation was done to investigate the thickness of epithelial layer.Results: The data were analyzed by Two-way Anova and the results showed that there was a significantdifference (p<0.05) in every decapitation period, groups, and interaction between decapitation period andgroups. The results of LSD test showed that there was a significant difference (p<0.05) in the thicknessof epithelial layer between negative control and C. rotundus groups.Conclusion: Cyperus rotundus extract accelerates epithelization process of wound healing in mice.Key words: Wound healing - Cyperus rotundus - epithelization - mice
Exclusive breastfeeding and risk of atopic dermatitis in high risk infant Sumadiono, Martaviani Budiastuti, Setya Wandita,
Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala Ilmu Kedokteran) Vol 39, No 04 (2007)
Publisher : Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala Ilmu Kedokteran)

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Abstract

Background: WHO recommends exclusive breast-feeding for 6 months becaase it is highly beneficial. It hasbeen proven by a number of studies to be advantageous in preventing various infectious diseases. However,its role in preventing allergic diseases especially atopic dermatitis in infant remains uncertain until recently.Objective: To find out whether high risk infant who did not receive exclusive breast-feeding would have agreater risk to suffer from atopic dermatitis.Method: We conducted a case-control study. Data were obtained from Pediatric Outpatient Clinics andDermatology and Venerology Outpatient Clinics, Dr. Sardjito Hospital Yogyakarta. Case group was highrisk infants with atopic dermatitis, while control group was high risk infants but not having the disease.Statistical analysis used Chi-square and degree of significance was stated as Confidence Interval (CI) of95% for each Odds Ratio (OR). Multivariate analysis was performed by using logistic regression method.Results: The study included 88 subjects with 44 subjects for case and control groupas well Logisticregression showed that not receiving exclusive breast-feeding was statistically significant risk factor toatopic dermatitis in high risk infant {OR 3.72 (95% CI: 1.40-9.90); p 0.01}.Conclusion: High risk infant not receiving exclusive breast-feeding will have greater risk to develop atopicdermatitis.Keywords: exclusive breast-feeding, atopic dermatitis; high risk infants.

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