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Articles 17 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 44, No 01 (2012)" : 17 Documents clear
Non-ST elevation of acute myocardial infarction caused by probable acute stent thrombosis after drug eluting stent implantation: a case report Bagus Andi Pramono, Budi Yuli Setianto
Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala Ilmu Kedokteran) Vol 44, No 01 (2012)
Publisher : Universitas Gadjah Mada

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Abstract

Nowadays, one of the modalities in performing reperfusion in coronary artery disease ispercutaneous coronary intervention. Before drug eluting stent era, the problem that occurs themost among interventional cardiologists is restenosis. After drug eluting stent era, restenosiscan be reduced significantly. Unfortunately, it further develops another problem, that is calledstent thrombosis. Mechanism of stent thrombosis is related to vascular response, thrombosis,coagulation, and clinical factors. Based on our experience, non-ST elevation acute myocardialinfarction is caused by probable acute stent thrombosis after drug eluting stent implantation.Therefore, the prevention and therapeutic approaches should be put first in our priority becauseit can provide a serious complication.
Correlation between overt hyperthyroid and subclinical hyperthyroid and cognitive impairment in Dr. Sardjito General Hospital, Yogyakarta, Indonesia Abdul Ghofir, Berkat Hia Pernodjo Dahlan
Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala Ilmu Kedokteran) Vol 44, No 01 (2012)
Publisher : Universitas Gadjah Mada

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Abstract

Hyperthyroidism is a metabolic imbalance resulting from excessive production of thyroid hormones.Overt or subclinical hyperthyroid prevalence has reached 20%. The differences in thyroid statusinduce apoptosis in adult cerebral cortex. Triiodothyroxine (T3) acts directly on the cerebralcortex mitochondria and induces the release of cytochrome-c which leads to apoptosis. Theincrease of hormone levels encountered in hyperthyroidism which is associated with an increasein necrotic death of neurons and oxidative stress has a negative effect on cognition. Severalstudies demonstrated the significant association of hyperthyroidism with cognitive impairment,despite remaining as controversial results. The study aimed to evaluate the correlation betweenovert hyperthyroid and subclinical hyperthyroid and cognitive impairment in hyperthyroidismpatients. This was a cross-sectional study involving 68 patients of hyperthyroidism who weretreated in Endocrine Clinic of Dr. Sardjito General Hospital, Yogyakarta. The inclusion criteriawere hyperthyroidism based on anamnesis, clinical examination and laboratory tests, age of 20-60 years, symptoms of hyperthyroidism, and minimum education of elementary school. Therelationship of hyperthyroidism and cognitive impairment, and multivariate analysis was analyzedby Chi-square and logistic regression tests, respectively. The results were considered as statisticallysignificant if the value of p was <0.05. The results showed that overt hyperthyroidism hadsignificantly associated with cognitive impairment (p = 0.021). Another variable associatedwith cognitive impairment was female gender (p = 0.019). In a multivariate analysis, the variablesof overt hyperthyroidism (p = 0.024) and sex (p = 0.025) had independent association withcognitive impairment. In conclusion, this study found that overt hyperthyroidism had a significantassociation with incidence of cognitive impairment compared to subclinical hyperthyroidism.Keywords: hyperthyroidism - overt - subclinical - cognitive - mini-mental state examination
The relationship between vitamin A and ferritin towards malondialdehyde level among Javanese male smokers Ahmad Hamim Sadewa, Ajeng Viska Icanervilia Sunarti
Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala Ilmu Kedokteran) Vol 44, No 01 (2012)
Publisher : Universitas Gadjah Mada

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Abstract

Cigarette smokes produce a large number of oxidants and promote secretion of ferritin byalveolar macrophages which are potential to encourage the lipid peroxidation. Malondialdehyde(MDA) is used as a parameter of lipid peroxidation. The study was aimed to evaluate therelationship between blood level of vitamin A and ferritin and MDA among Javanese malesmokers. Sixty men who lived in Purworejo District, Central Java, Indonesia comprising 30smokers as case group and 30 nonsmokers as control group were involved in this study. Bloodsample was obtained from cubiti vein and then centrifuged to obtain plasma or serum. Blood levelsof vitamin A, ferritin and MDA were measured by HPLC, ELISA and spectrophotometric methods,respectively. The result showed that the blood vitamin A, ferritin, and MDA levels in smokers were25.09±9.51μg/dL, 35.50±24.17ng/dL, 1.15±0.42μg/L, respectively, whereas in non smokers, theywere 26.11±9.19 μg/dL, 38.60±15.25 ng/dL, 1.06±0.50 μg/L, respectively. Therewas no significantdifference of the blood vitamin A, ferritin, and MDA levels between smokers and the non smokers(p>0.05). The linear regression analysis indicated that there was negative relationship betweenblood vitamin A and MDA levels although it was not significant (p=0.052), while blood ferritin andMDA levels had a significantly positive relationship (p=0.010). In conclusion, the low level of bloodvitamin A among cigarette smokers does not lead to high blood MDA level, while high level of bloodferritin among smokers leads to high blood MDA level.Keywords: vitamin A - ferritin - malondialdehyde - cigarette - smokers
Comparison of postthawing sperm motility recovery between cryopreserved with and without cryoprotective agent using 4 different cryopreservationmethods Irwan Taufiqur Rachman, Hilwah Nora Shofwal Widad
Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala Ilmu Kedokteran) Vol 44, No 01 (2012)
Publisher : Universitas Gadjah Mada

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Abstract

Frozen-thawed human spermatozoa are routinely used for many assisted reproduction program.However, cryopreserved spermatozoa was reported to yield lower pregnancy rates compared tofresh semen in both intra uterine inseminations and in vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperminjection (IVF/ICSI) due to the reduction of sperm motility and viability induced by cryopreservationprocedures. This study was aimed to evaluate the influence of cryoprotective agent (CPA) andcryopreservation methods on human sperm motility. This was a quasi experimental study. Thirtyseven normozoospermic semen samples collected in Permata Hati Infertility Clinics of Dr. SardjitoGeneral Hospital, Yogyakarta were recruited. Four different cryopreservation methods were appliedusing and without CPA (TEST-yolk buffer). In simple two steps freezing, cryostraw were graduallyfrozen from 8 to -4°C. In simple graduated freezing, cryostraus were directly frozen at -4°C. Invapor phase freezing method, the samples in cryostraw were placed 1 cm above liquid nitrogen.In the last method, the samples were directly submerged into liquid nitrogen. Thawing wasconducted by incubation at 37°C for 5 minutes. The sperm motility recovery after cryopreservationin the 4 different cryopreservation methods was evaluated and analyzed by analysis of variance(ANOVA). The fresh sperm motility before cryopreservation was 52.9 ± 4.50%. The recovery ofmotile sperms was 17.00 ± 7.83%, 20.96 ± 5.81%, 15.06 ± 8.55% and 15.68 ± 8.3%, whenusing CPA and 5.63 ± 4.63%, 5.47 ± 3.95%, 4.45 ± 4.46% and 6.08 ± 5.06% when withoutCPA following direct plunge to liquid nitrogen freezing, vapor liquid nitrogen freezing, simplegraduated freezing and simple 2-steps freezing, respectively. Among methods using CPA, thevapor phase method resulted in highest sperm motility recovery. In methods without CPA, nosignificant difference of sperm motility recovery was observed among the 4 differentcryopreservation methods. In conclusion, the use of CPA for cryopreservation improves spermmotility recovery.
The relationship between body mass index (BMI) with the distance of the skin-epidural space in 3rd and 4th lumbar epidural anesthesia in nonobstetric surgery of Indonesian patients Sri Rahardjo, Agung Sutrisno Yusmein Uyun
Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala Ilmu Kedokteran) Vol 44, No 01 (2012)
Publisher : Universitas Gadjah Mada

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Abstract

Skin to epidural space distance varies in an insertion of epidural needle which can greatly affectthe identification of the epidural space and epidural anesthesia complications. Therefore, acareful prediction of skin to epidural space distance is needed in doing insertions. The purposeof this study was to evaluate the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and the distanceof skin to the epidural space in the 3rd – 4th lumbar epidural anesthesia in nonobstetric surgery ofIndonesian patients. This was a prospective observational study with cross sectional designinvolving patients of both sexes between the age 18-65 years with ASA physical status I-II whounderwent non obstetric surgery with 3rd-4th lumbar epidural anesthesia in Dr. Sardjito GeneralHospital, Yogyakarta and in Satellite Hospital. Weight, height and BMI were considered as theindependent variables, whereas skin to epidural space distance was considered as dependentvariable. Data were collected and analyzed using multiple regression analysis continued usingPearson’s correlation test to evaluate the relationship between BMI and skin to epidural spacedistance. One hundred patients selected from October to December 2011 were evaluated in thisstudy. The mean of weight, height and BMI were 57.35±11.59 kg, 155.98±5.88 cm and23.52±4.26 kg/m2, respectively. The mean of skin to epidural space distance of non obstetricsurgery of Indonesian patients was 40.89±9.95 mm. Multiple regression analysis showed thatBMI had a strongest relationship (r= 0.81; p<0.03) with skin to epidural space distance comparedto weight (r= 0.11; p=0.78) and height (r= 0.04; p<0.83). Further analysis using Pearsoncorrelation test showed that a significantly good correlation of BMI (r=0.92; p=0.001) andbody weight (r=0.87; p=0.001) with the skin to epidural space distance were observed. Inconclusion, BMI and body weight have a significant correlation with the skin to epidural spacedistance in non obstetric surgery patient. 
The correlation between the intensity of benzene exposure and complete blood count in the oil and natural gas company workers in East Kalimantan Ngatidjan, Idha Arfianti Wiraagni Iwan Dwiprahasto
Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala Ilmu Kedokteran) Vol 44, No 01 (2012)
Publisher : Universitas Gadjah Mada

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Abstract

Benzene is one of the dangerous chemical substances which can cause some health disturbances.Meta-analysis shows that people who are exposed to benzene have a leukemia risk of 1.4 timesmore than the ones who are not. The employees who are exposed to benzene for a long timehave a probability to receive the toxic effect from benzene. This study was conducted to evaluatethe relationship between the intensity of benzene exposure and blood count of employees in theoil and natural gas company in East Kalimantan. This research was conducted to 897 employeeswith case control design. The control group consisted of 521 subjects, whereas the case groupconsisted of 376 subjects. The subjects were 39.91±10.90 years old, with the working termbetween 1 to 36 years. Data were obtained from routine medical check-up and health riskassessment in 2007 – 2010. The independent variable namely benzene exposure and the dependentvariable namely result of blood count, were analyzed by using chi-square bivariat analysis.Intensity of benzene exposure was measured as OVM (Organic Vapour Monitor) for externaldosage and SPMA (S-phenylmercapturic acid) for internal dosage. The intensity of benzene in2007 was 1.07± 5.5 ppm (OVM) and average of SPMA was 11.54±5.28 ìg/g creatinine. Theintensity of benzene in 2009 was 4.15±13.6 ppm (OVM) and SPMA was 55.90±43.6 ìg/gcreatinine. The employees who were exposed to benzene had a risk of having a decrease ofeither hemoglobin, erythrocyte, thrombocyte, or leukocyte 1.71 times (95% CI, 1.18–2.48)compared with the control, although this reduction was still in the normal range (p= 0.004). Inconclusion, there was no relationship between the intensity of benzene exposure with the lowblood count of the employees.Keywords: benzene exposure - complete blood counts - oil and gas earth - mining - toxic effect
Effect of temperature and storage duration of Aedes aegypti mosquito specimens artificially infected with dengue-3 virus on the results of immunohistochemical examination Tri Baskoro Tunggul Satoto, Susilawati Sitti Rohmah Umniyati
Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala Ilmu Kedokteran) Vol 44, No 01 (2012)
Publisher : Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala Ilmu Kedokteran)

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Abstract

To confirm the presence of any dengue viral in a mosquito, mosquito’s head can be squashed ona slide and stained with immunohistochemical staining. The remaining samples then can bestored in the cryo freezer at -80ºC to avoid specimen damage. However, for laboratories withlimited facilities, with only a refrigerator with a temperature range of -20ºC to 4ºC is available,examination to evaluate whether the dengue antigen can still be detected in specimens storedat these temperature is necessary. It was a quasi-experimental study. Three to five-day-old adultfemale Aedes aegypti mosquitoes were injected intrathoracically with dengue-3 (DENV-3) strainH-87 virus and then maintained for about 7 days. The dengue viral antigen on mosquitoes wasidentified using immunohistochemical method after stored at a temperature of 4oC, -20oC, -80oCfor 2, 4 and 8 weeks. Mosquito specimens that were not stored were used as a positive control.Kappa value was counted to analyze level of agreements between two observers. Two-wayAnova was used to analyze mean positive rates. Kappa value showed poor agreement (0.00-0.16) between two observers when the specimens were stored at 4oC for 2-8 weeks, and showedgood agreement (Kappa value of 0.77), when stored at -20oC for 4 weeks. The kappa valueshowed very good agreement (0.90-0.92) when the specimens were stored at -20oC for 2 weeks,and at -80oC for 2-8 weeks. Mean positive rates of the specimens stored at 4oC were significantlylower (p<0.005) than stored at -20oC and -80oC, but there were no significant differencesbetween specimens stored at -20oC and -80oC (p>0.05). In conclusion, availability of thedengue viral antigen on mosquito specimens was influenced by temperature and storage durationof the specimens.Keywords: dengue virus - head squash - immunohistochemistry - kappa agreement - temperature
Prognostic factors for normal postnatal growth rate in low birth weight infants Setya Wandita, Kristia Hermawan Djauhar Ismail
Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala Ilmu Kedokteran) Vol 44, No 01 (2012)
Publisher : Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala Ilmu Kedokteran)

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Abstract

Postnatal growth restriction in low birth weight infants is associated with long term adverseneuro-developmental sequel. Meanwhile, infants with excessive weight gain in early weeks oflife have a greater likelihood of later obesity, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes. Identifyingfactors associated with acceptable growth rate in low birth weight infants is important toprevent this potential long term morbidity. The aim of this study was to identify factors associatedwith acceptable growth rate in low birth weight infants. Prospective cohort study was conductedamong 73 low birth weight infants. Growth rate of these infants was determined by serialweight measurement during perinatal care and after being discharged until 46 – 50 weeks postmenstrual age. Growth rate was considered normal if average daily weight gain is 10 – 20 g/kg/day. Factors associated with this acceptable growth rate were analyzed by univariate andmultivariate statistical analysis. Normal growth rate was found in 62.7% subjects (42/67).Significant rate difference of average daily growth was found between small for gestational age(SGA) infants and appropriate for gestational age (AGA) infants (mean difference -2.90 g/kg/day; 95%CI: -5.68 - -0.12). The SGA infants had a greater risk for gaining weight below acceptablegrowth rate (adjusted RR= 2.9; 95%CI: 1.1 – 8.5). In conclusion, SGA is the only factor whichcan be associated with normal growth rate in low birth weight infants. Moreover, SGA infantsare in a greater risk for having slower growth rate compared to AGA.Keywords: growth rate - post natal - low birth weight – prognostic - gestational rate
Neuroprotective effect of vitamin D3 toward apoptosis induced by ethanol in CA1 pyramidal cells of rat hippocampus Dwi Cahyani Ratna Sari, Junaedy Yunus Djoko Prakosa
Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala Ilmu Kedokteran) Vol 44, No 01 (2012)
Publisher : Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala Ilmu Kedokteran)

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Abstract

As an antioxidant, Vitamin D3 can protect neurons from damage caused by oxidative stress.Ethanol is known to have neurotoxic effects by inducing an increase in oxidative stress. One ofthe brain regions that is most sensitive to neurotoxic effects induced by ethanol is hippocampus,especially its CA1 region. This study was aimed to determine the neuroprotective effects ofvitamin D3 in preventing the apoptosis in CA1 hippocampal pyramidal cells induced by ethanol.Fifteen male Wistar rats (Rattus norvegicus) were randomly divided into three groups. The controlgroup was given daily normal saline solution intraperitoneally. The ethanol group was given20% ethanol solution at a dose of 3 g/kg BW/day intraperitoneally. The vitamin D3 group wasgiven vitamin D3 1 μg/kg BW/day in 20% ethanol solution at a dose of 3 g/kg BW/dayintraperitoneally. After 30 days, the rats were sacrificed, their brains were perfused with PBSfollowed by fixative and the hippocampus was dissected for histological preparations.Immunohistochemical staining for caspase was performed. Percentage of apoptotic CA1hippocampal pyramidal cells was calculated. The results showed there was no significant difference(p> 0.05) on the total number of pyramidal cells between the control group (20.52 ± 1.31), theethanol group (19.02 ± 1.60), and the vitamin D3 group (21. 06 ± 0.70) per field of view.However there was a significant increase (p<0.05) in the percentage of apoptotic CA1hippocampal pyramidal cells in in the ethanol group (16.09 ± 0.67%) compared to the controlgroup (10.60 ± 0.95%). Vitamin D3 significantly (p<0.05) prevented an increase in the percentageof apoptotic CA1 hippocampal pyramidal cells in the vitamin D3 group (10.82 ± 0.64%). Inconclusion, vitamin D3 had a neuroprotective effect to prevent an increase in apoptosis in CA1hippocampal pyramidal cells to the neurotoxic effects induced by ethanol.
Epidemiology of filariasis malayi in Muara Padang Village, Muara Padang SubDistrict, Banyuasin District, South Sumatra, Indonesia Sri Sumarni, Erwin Edyansyah Soeyoko
Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala Ilmu Kedokteran) Vol 44, No 01 (2012)
Publisher : Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala Ilmu Kedokteran)

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Abstract

Filariasis is still a public health problem in Indonesia especially in rural areas. In South SumatraProvince, 186 patients with chronic filariasis were reported in 2009 and 130 of them came fromBanyuasin District. In Muara Padang SubDistrict, there were 7 patients with chronic filariasisand 1 of them lived in Muara Padang Village. A finger blood survey has never been conducted inMuara Padang Village since elimination program started in 2002. The aim of the study was toevaluate epidemiology of filariasis malayi in the Muara Padang Village. This was a descriptivestudy using cross sectional design. Data were collected from finger blood survey, blood tests forreservoir host (cats), stage 3 of filarial larvae (L3) in mosquito and microfilaria periodicityexamination. From 520 finger blood samples collected from the inhabitants, microfilaria was notobserved. However, 1 subject was found to have elephantiasis caused by filariasis malayi asindicated by swelling leg below the knee. Moreover, 1 subject showed descending lymphangitissymptoms accompanied by fever, headache and weakness even though in blood examinationmicrofilaria was not found. Among 17 samples collected from cats, microfilaria of Brugia malayiwas not observed. However, animal filarial i.e. Dirofilaria repens was observed in 11 samplescollected. Among 701 mosquitoes dissection and examination, L3 was not found. Due to thefact that the microfilaria was not observed in all samples, microfilaria periodicity examinationwas not conducted. In conclusion, microfilaria of B. malayi was not observed in Muara PadangVillage. However, microfilaria of D. repens was observed in cats.

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