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Articles 10 Documents
Search results for , issue "Vol 23, No 04 (1991)" : 10 Documents clear
CT scan examination on stroke patients Arif Faisal, Arif Faisal
Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala Ilmu Kedokteran) Vol 23, No 04 (1991)
Publisher : Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala Ilmu Kedokteran)

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (410.65 KB)

Abstract

This study was conducted in patients with clinical stroke. The results showed that 61.3% patients had cerebral infarction, 33.0% hemorrhagic lesions and 5.7% was normal by CT scan examination. 12 of 29 hemorrhagic lesionswere associated with in [raven tri cular bleeding and these lesions have a poor prognosis.The cerebral infarctions were located mostly in capsula interna and nucleus le n tiforrnis, but the thalamus and capsula interna demonstrated as the main location for hemorrhagic lessons. The usefulness of CT scan in stroke lies especially in detecting the location, extension of lesion and in differentiating between ischemic and hemorrhagic lesions.Key Words: CT scan - in traventricular bleeding - hem iparesis - cerebral infarction - stroke
War and Medicine Radiopoetro, Radiopoetro
Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala Ilmu Kedokteran) Vol 23, No 04 (1991)
Publisher : Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala Ilmu Kedokteran)

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (238.35 KB)

Abstract

The aim of war is to inflict death in the greatest number and permanent injury among enemy troops, while the aim of medicine is to regain physical and mental health, to maintain medical wellbeing and to prevent diseases and physical disability. Therefore, the aims of war and medicine are in conflict.Paleinology is the science of war and peacewhich studies the causes of war and the conditions for peace and to search for means to realize those conditions, and for the necessary actions to prevent war and to promote peace.At present war is highly mechanized due to the development of technology, and this in turn is brought abou tby the advance of science. The mechanization of war makes possible mass killing, not limited anymore to combatants but includes civilians and children as well, who are ignorant of the purpose of the war. Weapon technology grows rapidly because it is not hampered by economic considerations as is business, but it is forced by political conflictss.Pure science changes human concepts concerning nature, himself and his fate. Applied science has greater influence and attracts wider attention, especially since it is applied to war. Thus, ethics has to follow closely the development of technology.Key Words: war and medicine polemology - human aggression - recombinant DNA - medical ethics
Insertion of Norplant by midwives and physicians: A comparative cohort study Risanto Siswosudarmo, Risanto Siswosudarmo
Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala Ilmu Kedokteran) Vol 23, No 04 (1991)
Publisher : Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (317.219 KB)

Abstract

A comparative cohort study on the insertion of Norplant by midwives and physicians had been carried out to compare its safety. A total of 500 acceptors participated in the study, 292 of which belonged to the midwive group and 202 to the physician group. They came from suburban areas surrounding the city of Yogyakarta. Although both groups were statistically differen tin terms of age and body weight, they were no t so clinically. Norplantwas delivered outside the hospital during the mass campaign (safari susuk), but standardized hospital asepsis was taken. Follow-up was done one week thereafter to detect the presence of complications or side-effects, such as pain, inflammation, abscess and sense of itching. t-test, chi-square test and relative risk were statistical analyses used in the study.Results showed that midwives inserted Norplant more rapidly compared to physicians (2.36 vs 3.45 minutes respectively), although it did not have clinical importance. 23.6% of cases among the in idwive group showed a variety of complications while that of the physician group was 19.7%, the relative risk being 1.20 (0.82-1.75). More detailed complications such as pain, inflammation, abscess and itching did not show significant difference. The risk of complication in all cases was influenced neither by the. duration of insertion nor by the level of education.The study concluded that midwives could insert Norplant as safe as physicians.Key Words: norplant-midwive-contraception-obstetrics-family planning
Drugfever: Case report Siti Nurdjanah, Siti Nurdjanah
Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala Ilmu Kedokteran) Vol 23, No 04 (1991)
Publisher : Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (342.282 KB)

Abstract

Fever is a feature of a variety of infectious and non-infectious diseases. Recognition of drug fever in hospitalized patients is critical. If the condition is not appreciated, the patient may be subjected to prolonged hospitalization and a variety of unnecessary antibiotics, laboratory, and radiologic studies.Fever is considered to be drug-induced, -an incompletely understood allergic hypersensitivity reaction to medication-, if other causes can be eliminated, if the temperature elevation is temporally associated with the administration ofsensitizing medication, and if the fever disappears within 72 hours after discontinuation of the medication. Any drug has the capacity to induce fever as an adverse reaction.This article reported three cases of drug fever. Patients appeared "inap p ropria tely well for the magnitude. of their temperature elevation. They typically felt comfortable. Administration of antipyretic medications made the patients very uncomfortable and induced shaking chills. Their body temperature normalized within 24 hours after discontinuation of sensitizing medication in two patients. However, in one patient, the drug was not discontinued and the fever sustained, because she needed the drug.Key Words: drug fever - adverse reaction - allergy - hypersensitivity - antipyretics
Disseminated intravascular coagulation Suhardi DA, Suhardi DA
Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala Ilmu Kedokteran) Vol 23, No 04 (1991)
Publisher : Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (403.846 KB)

Abstract

Bleeding may result from abnormalities of platelet, blood vessel walls, or coagulation. Acquired deficiency of coagulation factors is usually the result of impaired production or increased extravascular loss. Inappropriate intravascular utilization of coagulation factors, which is usually prevented by continuous rapid blood flow, circulating inhibitors of procoagulants, and removal of activated clotting factors, may result as defibrinogenation syndrome, disseminated intravascular coagulation, or consumption coag-ulopathy. Factors responsible for the diseminared intravascular coagulation include release of thromboplastic material into the circulation, endothelial damage, endotoxemia, antigen-antibody reactions, hypertension, hypoxia, acidosis, and re uculoendothelial blockage.This paper describes the clinical manifestations, pathogenesis and management of the disseminated intravascular coagulation which might be not so rare in the clinics.Key Words: disseminated in travascularcoagulation -hemon-hage.-defibrinogenation syndrome - coagulopathy -procoagulant inhibitor
War and Medicine Radiopoetro, Radiopoetro
Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala Ilmu Kedokteran) Vol 23, No 04 (1991)
Publisher : Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala ilmu Kedokteran)

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (238.35 KB)

Abstract

The aim of war is to inflict death in the greatest number and permanent injury among enemy troops, while the aim of medicine is to regain physical and mental health, to maintain medical wellbeing and to prevent diseases and physical disability. Therefore, the aims of war and medicine are in conflict.Paleinology is the science of war and peacewhich studies the causes of war and the conditions for peace and to search for means to realize those conditions, and for the necessary actions to prevent war and to promote peace.At present war is highly mechanized due to the development of technology, and this in turn is brought abou tby the advance of science. The mechanization of war makes possible mass killing, not limited anymore to combatants but includes civilians and children as well, who are ignorant of the purpose of the war. Weapon technology grows rapidly because it is not hampered by economic considerations as is business, but it is forced by political conflictss.Pure science changes human concepts concerning nature, himself and his fate. Applied science has greater influence and attracts wider attention, especially since it is applied to war. Thus, ethics has to follow closely the development of technology.Key Words: war and medicine polemology - human aggression - recombinant DNA - medical ethics
Insertion of Norplant by midwives and physicians: A comparative cohort study Risanto Siswosudarmo, Risanto Siswosudarmo
Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala Ilmu Kedokteran) Vol 23, No 04 (1991)
Publisher : Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala ilmu Kedokteran)

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (317.219 KB)

Abstract

A comparative cohort study on the insertion of Norplant by midwives and physicians had been carried out to compare its safety. A total of 500 acceptors participated in the study, 292 of which belonged to the midwive group and 202 to the physician group. They came from suburban areas surrounding the city of Yogyakarta. Although both groups were statistically differen tin terms of age and body weight, they were no t so clinically. Norplantwas delivered outside the hospital during the mass campaign (safari susuk), but standardized hospital asepsis was taken. Follow-up was done one week thereafter to detect the presence of complications or side-effects, such as pain, inflammation, abscess and sense of itching. t-test, chi-square test and relative risk were statistical analyses used in the study.Results showed that midwives inserted Norplant more rapidly compared to physicians (2.36 vs 3.45 minutes respectively), although it did not have clinical importance. 23.6% of cases among the in idwive group showed a variety of complications while that of the physician group was 19.7%, the relative risk being 1.20 (0.82-1.75). More detailed complications such as pain, inflammation, abscess and itching did not show significant difference. The risk of complication in all cases was influenced neither by the. duration of insertion nor by the level of education.The study concluded that midwives could insert Norplant as safe as physicians.Key Words: norplant-midwive-contraception-obstetrics-family planning
Disseminated intravascular coagulation Suhardi DA, Suhardi DA
Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala Ilmu Kedokteran) Vol 23, No 04 (1991)
Publisher : Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala ilmu Kedokteran)

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (403.846 KB)

Abstract

Bleeding may result from abnormalities' of platelet, blood vessel walls, or coagulation. Acquired deficiency of coagulation factors is usually the result of impaired production or increased extravascular loss. Inappropriate intravascular utilization of coagulation factors, which is usually prevented by continuous rapid blood flow, circulating inhibitors of procoagulants, and removal of activated clotting factors, may result as defibrinogenation syndrome, disseminated intravascular coagulation, or consumption coag-ulopathy. Factors responsible for the diseminared intravascular coagulation include release of thromboplastic material into the circulation, endothelial damage, endotoxemia, antigen-antibody reactions, hypertension, hypoxia, acidosis, and re uculoendothelial blockage.This paper describes the clinical manifestations, pathogenesis and management of the disseminated intravascular coagulation which might be not so rare in the clinics.Key Words: disseminated in travascularcoagulation -hemon-hage.-defibrinogenation syndrome - coagulopathy -procoagulant inhibitor
CT scan examination on stroke patients Arif Faisal, Arif Faisal
Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala Ilmu Kedokteran) Vol 23, No 04 (1991)
Publisher : Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala ilmu Kedokteran)

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (410.65 KB)

Abstract

This study was conducted in patients with clinical stroke. The results showed that 61.3% patients had cerebral infarction, 33.0% hemorrhagic lesions and 5.7% was normal by CT scan examination. 12 of 29 hemorrhagic lesionswere associated with in [raven tri cular bleeding and these lesions have a poor prognosis.The cerebral infarctions were located mostly in capsula interna and nucleus le n tiforrnis, but the thalamus and capsula interna demonstrated as the main location for hemorrhagic lessons. The usefulness of CT scan in stroke lies especially in detecting the location, extension of lesion and in differentiating between ischemic and hemorrhagic lesions.Key Words: CT scan - in traventricular bleeding - hem iparesis - cerebral infarction - stroke
Drugfever: Case report Siti Nurdjanah, Siti Nurdjanah
Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala Ilmu Kedokteran) Vol 23, No 04 (1991)
Publisher : Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala ilmu Kedokteran)

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (342.282 KB)

Abstract

Fever is a feature of a variety of infectious and non-infectious diseases. Recognition of drug fever in hospitalized patients is critical. If the condition is not appreciated, the patient may be subjected to prolonged hospitalization and a variety of unnecessary antibiotics, laboratory, and radiologic studies.Fever is considered to be drug-induced, -an incompletely understood allergic hypersensitivity reaction to medication-, if other causes can be eliminated, if the temperature elevation is temporally associated with the administration ofsensitizing medication, and if the fever disappears within 72 hours after discontinuation of the medication. Any drug has the capacity to induce fever as an adverse reaction.This article reported three cases of drug fever. Patients appeared "inap p ropria tely well' for the magnitude. of their temperature elevation. They typically felt comfortable. Administration of antipyretic medications made the patients very uncomfortable and induced shaking chills. Their body temperature normalized within 24 hours after discontinuation of sensitizing medication in two patients. However, in one patient, the drug was not discontinued and the fever sustained, because she needed the drug.Key Words: drug fever - adverse reaction - allergy - hypersensitivity - antipyretics

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