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Articles 12 Documents
Search results for , issue "Vol 46, No 01 (2014)" : 12 Documents clear
Anti-hepatitis B surface (anti-HBs) seroprotection in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia post hepatitis B vaccination in Indonesia Roni Naning, Yustinah Nenny Sri Mulyani
Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala Ilmu Kedokteran) Vol 46, No 01 (2014)
Publisher : Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (299.908 KB) | DOI: 10.19106/JMedScie004601201402

Abstract

Children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) receiving chemotherapy are at high risk fordeveloping hepatitis B infection. Protective effect of hepatitis B vaccination in children withALL in Indonesia has not been investigated yet. The aim of study was to determine the proportiondifference of anti-HBs seroprotection between children with ALL and without malignancy posthepatitis B vaccination. We had conducted a case-control study from January to February 2012at Dr. Sardjito General Hospital, Yogyakarta. We ascertained 1-15 years old children with ALLreceiving chemotherapy and without malignancy who had hepatitis B vaccination. Sixty sevenchildren were included in this study. Anti-HBs seroprotection level was measured using anenzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The results were analyzed using Chi-square test.Twenty one children (65.6%) with ALL and 13 children (37.1%) without malignancy showedanti-HBs seroprotection. The difference was statistically significant with p-value of 0.020(prevalence ratio [PR]=0.3; 95% CI=0.11-0.84). Both groups showed no significantly differenceof anti-HBs seroprotection according to either female gender, risk classification, or phase ofchemotherapy with p-value of 0.38 (PR =4; 95% CI=1.05-15.2), 0.248 (PR =3.37; 95%CI=0.58-19.6) or 0.214, respectively. In conclusion, the proportion of anti-HBs seroprotectionin children with ALL is higher than those without malignancy.
The influence of iron supplementation in pregnant women to the occurrence of low birth weight (LBW) babies in Palu, Central Sulawesi R. Detty Siti Nurdiati Z, Sri Restu Djaswadi Dasuki
Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala Ilmu Kedokteran) Vol 46, No 01 (2014)
Publisher : Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (464.054 KB) | DOI: 10.19106/JMedScie004601201406

Abstract

Low birth weight (LBW) babies remains a major problem world wide as it causes a high rate ofneonatal morbidity and mortality. One effort to reduce the prevalence of LBW babies is byproviding iron supplementation to the pregnant women. The aim of this study was to examinethe relationship between iron supplementation program and prevalence of LBW babies in Palu,Central Sulawesi. This was an observational study with case control design. Subjects were allLBW babies from mothers that had accepted iron supplementation during pregnancy. Samplesize in this study was 87 for case and 87 for control. Bivariate analysis showed that ironsupplementation that not comply the program had a significant correlation with prevalence ofLBW babies (p=0.01). Other significant factors include abnormal hemoglobin level (p=0.01),body mass index (BMI) (p=0.02), educational level (p=0.02), multiparity (p=0.03), andgestational age (prematurity) (p=0.03). Multivariate analysis revealed that the strongest riskfactor for the occurrence of LBW babies was iron supplementation that not comply the program(OR= 3.82; 95% CI: 1.77- 8.22). Other risk factors were hemoglobin level (OR= 3.45; 95% CI:1.59-7.49), BMI (OR= 2.27; 95% CI: 1.05-4.91), gestational age (OR= 3.11; 95% CI: 1.45-6.67), multiparity (OR= 2.98, 95% CI: 1.36-6.51), and educational level (OR= 2.38, 95% CI:1.12-5.03). Based on the analysis, the strongest risk factors that affected the prevalence of LBWwas iron supplementation, abnormal hemoglobin level, gestational age, multiparity and educationlevel. In conclusion, iron supplementation during pregnancy that not comply with the programwas the strongest risk factor of LBW babies. The prevalence of LBW babies can be reduced bycontrolling of iron supplementation, hemoglobin level, BMI, gestational age, parity and education.
Relationship between perimenopause symptoms and bone mineral density Siswishanto Rukmono, Aida Djaswadi Dasuki
Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala Ilmu Kedokteran) Vol 46, No 01 (2014)
Publisher : Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (334.833 KB) | DOI: 10.19106/JMedScie004601201404

Abstract

The menopausal transition or perimenopause is associated with numerous symptoms. Womenentering perimonopause normally have menstrual irregular periods due to an imbalance of serumestradiol. Since the status of estrogen is known as an important determinant of bone massdensity, menopausal symptoms can be an effective indicator of bone status in women. Thisstudy aimed to evaluate the relationship between perimenopause symptoms and bone mineraldensity (BMD). This was an observational study using cross-sectional design conducted duringthree months periode from June to August 2010 in Kalangan Village, Banguntapan, BantulDistrict. Subjects were women between the aged 46-55 years who fulfilled the inclusion andexclusion criteria. After underwent history taking, subjects underwent physical examinationaccording to International Physical Activity Questionnaires (IPAQ). The BMD of subjects wasthan measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA). The relationship betweenperimenopause symptoms and BMD was then evaluated using multivariate analysis. The resultsshowed that perimenopause symptoms increase abnormal BMD of subjects 1.38 times higherthan those without perimenopause symptoms (RR=1.38; 95%CI 1.39-13.78; p=0.01). Inconclusion, the perimenopause symptoms is associated with the high proportion of abnormalBMD in women.
Cytotoxicity of α-terpineol in HeLa cell line and its effects to apoptosis and cell cycle Mustofa, Rasuane Noor Indwiani Astuti
Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala Ilmu Kedokteran) Vol 46, No 01 (2014)
Publisher : Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (649.907 KB) | DOI: 10.19106/JMedScie004601201401

Abstract

α-Terpineol is a natural compound of terpenoid alcohols class. However, it can be synthesizedfrom α-pinene of turpentin content. α-Terpineol has been reported as potential anticancer agentdue to its activity on inhibition of cells growth and induction of tumor cell death. However, itsanticancer activity in HeLa cervical cancer cells line has never been studied, yet. The aim of thisstudy was to evaluate the cytotoxicity of α-terpineol and its effects to apoptosis and cell cycle.This was a quasi-experimental study with post-test only with non-equivalent control groupdesign. Cytotoxicity of á-terpineol was evaluated using MTT cell viability assay. The effect of α-terpineol on cell apoptotis was tested using acridine orange-ethidium bromide staining method,whereas its effect on cell cycle was evaluated by flowcytometry method. The results showedthat α-terpineol had cytotoxicity against HeLa cell with an IC50 value about 12.46 μg/mL.Furthermore, α-terpineol induced the HeLa with an IC50 value about 13.12 μg/mL. Cell accumulationat G1 phase during cell cycle after incubation with α-terpineol (52.78)was observed. In conclusion,α-terpineol is potential as an anticancer due to its ability to induce cell apoptosis and to inhibitthe cell cycle at G1 phase.
Relationship of Geriatric Nutritional Risk Index (GNRI) with length of hospitalization and mortality rate in elderly patients Neneng Ratnasari, Retno Ambarukminingsih I Dewa Putu Pramantara
Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala Ilmu Kedokteran) Vol 46, No 01 (2014)
Publisher : Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (483.624 KB) | DOI: 10.19106/JMedScie004601201405

Abstract

The proportion of elderly population is growing faster than any other age group. Malnutrition isa widespread problem in elderly and has been recognized as the most common cause of mortalityand morbidity. Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA) is recommended to detect malnutrition riskamong geriatrics. However, it is just appropriate for geriatric who stay at home. For hospitalizationpatients, Nutritional Risk Index (NRI) that using albumin and weight is recommended. However,the weight data is often not possible obtained in geriatrics. Therefore, Geriatric Nutritional RiskIndex (GNRI) using ideal body weight is recommended. The aim of this study was to evaluaterelationship of GNRI with length of hospitalization and mortality rate in geriatric patients. Thiswas an observational study with a prospective cohort design conducted in Dr. Sardjito GeneralHospital, Yogyakarta from January to February 2012. Patients who met the inclusion and exclusioncriteria were recruited. Laboratoty and clinical examinations as well as GNRI scoring were thenperformed. Patients were grouped into two groups i.e. patients with GNRI score < 82 and e”82. The patients were then monitored during hospitalization until they were discharged due todie or recovered. The length of stay and patients died were then recorded. The results showedthat the length of stay of patients with GNRI score < 82 (14.32 ± 8.20 days) was significantlylonger than those with GNRI score 82 (9.31 ± 6.15 days) (p = 0.006). Moreover, the mortalityrate of patients with GNRI score < 82 (42.1%) was significantly higher than those with GNRIscore 82 (2.8%) (p = 0.000). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed survival rate of patientswith GNRI score <82 rapidly decreased when compared with those with GNRI score 82. Inconclusion, there is negative correlation between GNRI with length of hospitalization and mortalityrate in elderly.
Cost-effectiveness comparison between caudal block and intravenous ketorolac as an early post-operative analgesic in pediatric patients underwent surgery below umbilicus segment Djayanti Sari, Juni Kurniawaty Muhdar Abubakar
Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala Ilmu Kedokteran) Vol 46, No 01 (2014)
Publisher : Universitas Gadjah Mada

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar

Abstract

Post-operative pain treatment in pediatric is frequently inadequate that could lead to psychological,physiological and behavioral changes. Therefore, adequate pediatric pain management is needed.Some analgesics such as ketorolac and regional anesthesia techniques such as caudal blockhave been applied to relieve pain. Ketorolac and caudal block have its own advantages anddisadvantages. The aim of study was to compare the cost-effectiveness of ketorolac and caudalblok as a post-operative analgesic in pediatric. This was double blind randomized controlledclinical trial with parallel design conducted in Dr. Sardjito General Hospital. The subjects werechildren who underwent surgery below umbilicus segment. Seventy patients were randomlydivided into two groups with 35 patients in each group. Group I (Caudal block Group) was givencaudal block with bupivacaine 0.12% 1 mL/kg body weight (BW) whereas Group II (KetorolacGroup) was given ketorolac 0.5 mg/kg BW intravenously (IV). The patient’s pain was scored at 0,15, 30, 45 minute and 1, 2, 3 hours after the conscious patients using modified Children’sHospital of Eastern Ontario Pain Scale (mCHEOPS). Furthermore, the cost-effectiveness theboth interventions was also compared. The caudal block was more effective in reducing painthan the ketorolac at minutes 0 (27/8 vs 10/25) and 15 (34/1 vs 18/17) (p<0.05). However, atthird hour the ketorolac revealed more effective than the caudal block (29/6 vs 32/3) (p<0.05).The cost of the caudal block was higher than the ketorolac (IDR 95.860 ± 5.745 vs IDR 7.200± 14.886) (p <0.05). However, the length of stay after the caudal block was shorter than theketorolac (40.43 ± 13.899 vs 48.57 ± 14.068) (p <0.05). Morphine was more needed forrescue analgesic in the ketorolac (p < 0.05) in first hour of operation, whereas after three houroperation paracetamol was more needed in caudal block (p < 0.05). In conclusion, the caudalblock is not more cost-effective than ketorolac in reducing post-operative pain in pediatricpatients underwent surgery below umbilicus segment.
Cost-effectiveness comparison between caudal block and intravenous ketorolac as an early post-operative analgesic in pediatric patients underwent surgery below umbilicus segment Kurniawaty, Juni; Abubakar, Muhdar; Sari, Djayanti
Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala Ilmu Kedokteran) Vol 46, No 01 (2014)
Publisher : Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala ilmu Kedokteran)

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (361.616 KB) | DOI: 10.19106/JMedScie004601201403

Abstract

Post-operative pain treatment in pediatric is frequently inadequate that could lead to psychological,physiological and behavioral changes. Therefore, adequate pediatric pain management is needed.Some analgesics such as ketorolac and regional anesthesia techniques such as caudal blockhave been applied to relieve pain. Ketorolac and caudal block have its own advantages anddisadvantages. The aim of study was to compare the cost-effectiveness of ketorolac and caudalblok as a post-operative analgesic in pediatric. This was double blind randomized controlledclinical trial with parallel design conducted in Dr. Sardjito General Hospital. The subjects werechildren who underwent surgery below umbilicus segment. Seventy patients were randomlydivided into two groups with 35 patients in each group. Group I (Caudal block Group) was givencaudal block with bupivacaine 0.12% 1 mL/kg body weight (BW) whereas Group II (KetorolacGroup) was given ketorolac 0.5 mg/kg BW intravenously (IV). The patient’s pain was scored at 0,15, 30, 45 minute and 1, 2, 3 hours after the conscious patients using modified Children’sHospital of Eastern Ontario Pain Scale (mCHEOPS). Furthermore, the cost-effectiveness theboth interventions was also compared. The caudal block was more effective in reducing painthan the ketorolac at minutes 0 (27/8 vs 10/25) and 15 (34/1 vs 18/17) (p<0.05). However, atthird hour the ketorolac revealed more effective than the caudal block (29/6 vs 32/3) (p<0.05).The cost of the caudal block was higher than the ketorolac (IDR 95.860 ± 5.745 vs IDR 7.200± 14.886) (p <0.05). However, the length of stay after the caudal block was shorter than theketorolac (40.43 ± 13.899 vs 48.57 ± 14.068) (p <0.05). Morphine was more needed forrescue analgesic in the ketorolac (p < 0.05) in first hour of operation, whereas after three houroperation paracetamol was more needed in caudal block (p < 0.05). In conclusion, the caudalblock is not more cost-effective than ketorolac in reducing post-operative pain in pediatricpatients underwent surgery below umbilicus segment.
Anti-hepatitis B surface (anti-HBs) seroprotection in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia post hepatitis B vaccination in Indonesia Yustinah, .; Mulyani, Nenny Sri; Naning, Roni
Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala Ilmu Kedokteran) Vol 46, No 01 (2014)
Publisher : Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala ilmu Kedokteran)

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (299.908 KB) | DOI: 10.19106/JMedScie004601201402

Abstract

Children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) receiving chemotherapy are at high risk fordeveloping hepatitis B infection. Protective effect of hepatitis B vaccination in children withALL in Indonesia has not been investigated yet. The aim of study was to determine the proportiondifference of anti-HBs seroprotection between children with ALL and without malignancy posthepatitis B vaccination. We had conducted a case-control study from January to February 2012at Dr. Sardjito General Hospital, Yogyakarta. We ascertained 1-15 years old children with ALLreceiving chemotherapy and without malignancy who had hepatitis B vaccination. Sixty sevenchildren were included in this study. Anti-HBs seroprotection level was measured using anenzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The results were analyzed using Chi-square test.Twenty one children (65.6%) with ALL and 13 children (37.1%) without malignancy showedanti-HBs seroprotection. The difference was statistically significant with p-value of 0.020(prevalence ratio [PR]=0.3; 95% CI=0.11-0.84). Both groups showed no significantly differenceof anti-HBs seroprotection according to either female gender, risk classification, or phase ofchemotherapy with p-value of 0.38 (PR =4; 95% CI=1.05-15.2), 0.248 (PR =3.37; 95%CI=0.58-19.6) or 0.214, respectively. In conclusion, the proportion of anti-HBs seroprotectionin children with ALL is higher than those without malignancy.
The influence of iron supplementation in pregnant women to the occurrence of low birth weight (LBW) babies in Palu, Central Sulawesi Restu, Sri; Dasuki, Djaswadi; Nurdiati Z, R. Detty Siti
Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala Ilmu Kedokteran) Vol 46, No 01 (2014)
Publisher : Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala ilmu Kedokteran)

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (464.054 KB) | DOI: 10.19106/JMedScie004601201406

Abstract

Low birth weight (LBW) babies remains a major problem world wide as it causes a high rate ofneonatal morbidity and mortality. One effort to reduce the prevalence of LBW babies is byproviding iron supplementation to the pregnant women. The aim of this study was to examinethe relationship between iron supplementation program and prevalence of LBW babies in Palu,Central Sulawesi. This was an observational study with case control design. Subjects were allLBW babies from mothers that had accepted iron supplementation during pregnancy. Samplesize in this study was 87 for case and 87 for control. Bivariate analysis showed that ironsupplementation that not comply the program had a significant correlation with prevalence ofLBW babies (p=0.01). Other significant factors include abnormal hemoglobin level (p=0.01),body mass index (BMI) (p=0.02), educational level (p=0.02), multiparity (p=0.03), andgestational age (prematurity) (p=0.03). Multivariate analysis revealed that the strongest riskfactor for the occurrence of LBW babies was iron supplementation that not comply the program(OR= 3.82; 95% CI: 1.77- 8.22). Other risk factors were hemoglobin level (OR= 3.45; 95% CI:1.59-7.49), BMI (OR= 2.27; 95% CI: 1.05-4.91), gestational age (OR= 3.11; 95% CI: 1.45-6.67), multiparity (OR= 2.98, 95% CI: 1.36-6.51), and educational level (OR= 2.38, 95% CI:1.12-5.03). Based on the analysis, the strongest risk factors that affected the prevalence of LBWwas iron supplementation, abnormal hemoglobin level, gestational age, multiparity and educationlevel. In conclusion, iron supplementation during pregnancy that not comply with the programwas the strongest risk factor of LBW babies. The prevalence of LBW babies can be reduced bycontrolling of iron supplementation, hemoglobin level, BMI, gestational age, parity and education.
Cytotoxicity of α-terpineol in HeLa cell line and its effects to apoptosis and cell cycle Noor, Rasuane; Astuti, Indwiani; Mustofa, .
Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala Ilmu Kedokteran) Vol 46, No 01 (2014)
Publisher : Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala ilmu Kedokteran)

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (649.907 KB) | DOI: 10.19106/JMedScie004601201401

Abstract

α-Terpineol is a natural compound of terpenoid alcohols class. However, it can be synthesizedfrom α-pinene of turpentin content. α-Terpineol has been reported as potential anticancer agentdue to its activity on inhibition of cells growth and induction of tumor cell death. However, itsanticancer activity in HeLa cervical cancer cells line has never been studied, yet. The aim of thisstudy was to evaluate the cytotoxicity of α-terpineol and its effects to apoptosis and cell cycle.This was a quasi-experimental study with post-test only with non-equivalent control groupdesign. Cytotoxicity of á-terpineol was evaluated using MTT cell viability assay. The effect of α-terpineol on cell apoptotis was tested using acridine orange-ethidium bromide staining method,whereas its effect on cell cycle was evaluated by flowcytometry method. The results showedthat α-terpineol had cytotoxicity against HeLa cell with an IC50 value about 12.46 μg/mL.Furthermore, α-terpineol induced the HeLa with an IC50 value about 13.12 μg/mL. Cell accumulationat G1 phase during cell cycle after incubation with α-terpineol (52.78)was observed. In conclusion,α-terpineol is potential as an anticancer due to its ability to induce cell apoptosis and to inhibitthe cell cycle at G1 phase.

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