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Articles 15 Documents
Search results for , issue "Vol 50, No 2 (2018)" : 15 Documents clear
The correlation between occurrence of dental caries and oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) of elderly population in Yogyakarta Special Region Agustina, Dewi; Hanindriyo, L; Widita, E; Widyaningrum, R
Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala Ilmu Kedokteran) Vol 50, No 2 (2018)
Publisher : Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala ilmu Kedokteran)

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (316.396 KB) | DOI: 10.19106/JMedSci005002201808

Abstract

Dental caries is the most common oral disease affecting humans. Based on the Indonesia Basic Health Research (Riskesdas) 2013, prevalence of dental caries in 2013 increased up to 53.2% from 43.4% in 2007. One of the two most increasing prevalence occurred in population of more than 65 years. This disease might affect oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) since it causes pain, physical and psychological discomfort. The aim of the study was to evaluate the correlation between occurrence of dental caries and OHRQoL in elderly population in Yogyakarta Special Region. One hundred and eighteen people aged 60 – 80 years consisting 73 female and 45 male involved in the study. The occurrence of dental caries and OHRQoL were determined using decay-missing-filling teeth (DMFT) index, whereas geriatric oral health assessment index (GOHAI) instruments, respectively. The data then were classified into very low, low, moderate and high DMFT and low, moderate and high GOHAI. Spearman’s rank correlation test was conducted to determine correlation between occurrence of dental caries and OHRQoL. Mean scores ofDMFT index and GOHAI were 16.61 ± 7.16 and 47.97 ± 9.03, respectively. Very low, low, moderate, and high DMFT index were experienced by 4 (3.38%), 13 (11.02%), 25 (21.19%) and 76 (64.41%) of 118 elderly, respectively. Low, moderate and high GOHAI were experienced by 71 (60.17%), 25 (21.19%) and 22 (18.64%) of 118 elderly, respectively. Spearman’s rank correlation test showed that the correlation coefficient (r) was -0.263 (p=0.004). There is a negative moderate significant correlation between the occurrence of dental caries and OHRQoL of elderly population in Yogyakarta Special Region.
Ephaptic crosstalk in Painful Diabetic Neuropathy: an electrodiagnostic study. Asmedi, Ahmad; Wibowo, Samekto; Meliala, Lucas
Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala Ilmu Kedokteran) Vol 50, No 2 (2018)
Publisher : Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala ilmu Kedokteran)

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (286.708 KB) | DOI: 10.19106/JMedSci005002201806

Abstract

Painful Diabetic Neuropathy (PDN) is a common complication of diabetes mellitus(DM) which significantly causes pain and distress in patients. Release of factors fromdegenerating fibers activating adjacent fibers to produce ephaptic crosstalk have beenproposed as one of the pain mechanism in PDN. Here we aim to detect ephaptic crosstalkbetween small fibers and large fibers in PDN subjects by comparing the electrodiagnosticresult of patients with PDN and patients without PDN.This study used cohort prospective design. Patients with type 2 DM or impairedglucose tolerance (IGT) without PDN from several health facilities in Yogyakarta werefollowed for 12 months for the occurrence of PDN. Demographic, clinical, laboratory andelectrodiagnostic data from all patients were collected and analyzed.One hundred and forty-one subjects (58 men, 83 women) with an average age of 51years (range, 40–61 years), were enrolled in this study. After 48 weeks of observation,12 subjects were found to have PDN. The differences of distal latency between PDNand non-PDN group were significant when measured in median sensory nerve (4.47 ms±2.43 versus 3.39 ms ±1.79, p = 0.002), tibial motor nerve (6.96 ms ±3.07 versus5.90 ms ±2.17, p = 0.041), and sural sensory nerve (6.02 ms ±3.56 versus 3.55ms ±2.90, p <0.001). Among all parameters measured in this study, the H-reflex hadhigher abnormality persentage compared to other electrodiagnostic variable (H latency =30%, H amplitude = 71%, H/M Ratio = 88%, and H-M IPL = 15%).Our result shows that small fiber neuropathy in PDN can be detected by electrodiagnosticstudy which measures large fibers function. This indicates that ephaptic crosstalkbetween small fiber and large fiber happens in PDN.
Ethanolic extract of the Centella asiatica (L.) Urb. leaf decreases cerebellar brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels in rats after chronic stress Sari, Dwi Cahyani Ratna; Juananda, Desby; Ar-Rochmah, Mawaddah; Romi, Muhammad Mansyur; Arfian, Nur
Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala Ilmu Kedokteran) Vol 50, No 2 (2018)
Publisher : Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala ilmu Kedokteran)

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (770.994 KB) | DOI: 10.19106/JMedSci005002201801

Abstract

Chronic stress produces glucocorticoid-induced neurotoxicity that may lead to alterations of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) concentration in the brain. Cerebellum is known to be severely affected by glucocorticoids-associated oxidative damage. Centella asiatica (L.) Urb. may protect neurons from oxidative damage. This study aimed to investigate the effect of ethanolic extract of C. asiatica (L.) Urb. leaf on the rat cerebellar BDNF levels following stress. Twenty young-adult male Sprague Dawley rats were randomly assigned into four experimental groups. The stress control group received aquadest, and the other groups were treated with different doses of the C. asiatica (L.) Urb. extract i.e 150 (CeA150), 300 (CeA300) and 600 (CeA600) mg/kg body weight/day orally, respectively and followed by chronic footshock stress for 28 days. Upon completion of the experimental period, all animals were sacrificed and the cerebellar was isolated. The BDNF levels from the cerebellar tissue lysate was measured using ELISA. The mean BDNF levels of the cerebellar tissue in the stress control, CeA150, CeA300 and CeA600 groups were 1217.10±301.40; 771.46±241.45; 757.05±268.29; and 627.00±246.02 pg/mL, respectively. Post-hoc analysis showed a significant difference between the control and treatment groups (p< 0.05). In conclusion, the ethanolic extracts of the C. asiatica (L.) Urb. leaf decrease the cerebellar BDNF levels in rats after chronic stress.
Surgical outcome of scoliosis in Marfan syndrome: a case series report irianto, komang agung; Wardana, Gestana R
Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala Ilmu Kedokteran) Vol 50, No 2 (2018)
Publisher : Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala ilmu Kedokteran)

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (410.959 KB) | DOI: 10.19106/JMedSci005002201814

Abstract

Scoliosis in marfan syndrome (MFS) manifests on 60% patients. Moreover, the scoliosisnoticeable in earlier age is more progressive, refracted, and rigid compared to idiopathicadult scoliosis. The surgical correction provides notorious higher perioperative risk,whereas conservative treatment using brace is not effective to prevent progressivityof the scoliosis. In this a case report, we reported the surgical outcome of MFS scoliaispatients with MFS who operated using posterior fusion instrumentation by mean of thequality of life SF-36 questioner. This was a retrospective case series involving five MFSscoliosis patients who underwent posterior fusion instrumentation with initial Cobb angleof 87.417.57o and initial kyphotic angle of 32.8 ± 14.52o. Clinical, radiological andquality of life of the patients based on SF-36 questionnaire were evaluated within 6-36months follow up. Post-operative showed the Cobb angle become 46.2 ± 16.3o and thekyphotic angle become 21.6 ± 9.94o. No intraoperative or post-operative complicationswere observed. After 6-36 months follow up, the Cobb angle became 45.2 ± 17.48oand the kyphotic angle became 21.6 ± 9.94o. In addition, all patients had physical andmental health scored similar to 2 years post-surgery scoliosis scoring according to SF-36 orthopedic scoring guidelines. I conclusion, the surgical outcome of posterior fusioninstrumentation in MFS scoliosis showed good correction of Cobb angle and Kyphoticangle. The quality of life of the patients based on physical and mental health questionnaireis satisfactory.
The effects of ethanolic extract of Phaleria macrocarpa (Scheff.) Boerl leaf on macrophage phagocytic activity in diabetic rat model Lestari, Ira Cinta; Ghufron, Muhammad; Herwiyanti, Sri; Sumiwi, Yustina Andwi Ari
Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala Ilmu Kedokteran) Vol 50, No 2 (2018)
Publisher : Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala ilmu Kedokteran)

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (893.016 KB) | DOI: 10.19106/JMedSci005002201802

Abstract

Diabetic patients suffer inflammation and immune deficiency as a consequence of the decrease in macrophage phagocytic activity, thus making them vulnerable to infection. The ability of Ethanolic Extract of Phaleria macrocarpa Leaf (EEPML) to increase macrophage phagocytic activity has also a potential in the diabetic case. EEPML also has anti-inflammatory effect. In this study the EEPML potential to increase peritoneal macrophage phagocytic activity and change M1 and M2 macrophage percentage in diabetic rat model is investigated. This was a quasi experimental study with post test only control group design. Fourty five male Sprague Dawley rats within the age of 8 weeks were classified into normal control group, diabetic control group with solvent, diabetic with 7mg/200g, 14mg/200g, and 28mg/200g of EEPML peroral administration, once a day. The diabetic rat model was made with streptozotocin and nicotinamide injection. The rats were terminated in 3rd, 14th and 25th day of extract administration. Peritoneal fluid was isolated then cultured for macrophage phagocytic activity assay with latex beads. M1 and M2 macrophage percentage was  analyzed using flow cytometry with anti CD40 and CD206 antibody. Result of statistical analysis show that  active macrophage and phagocytic index mean of EEPML rat groups on day 3, 14 and 25 was significantly higher than the control group. The mean of M1 macrophage percentage of EEPML rat groups was significantly higher than control on day 3 and 14, and lower on day 25, while mean of M2 macrophage percentage didn’t show any significant difference within groups. Conclusion of this study is administration of EEPML increases peritoneal macrophage phagocytic activity on day 3, 14 and 25. This is also increases M1 macrophage percentage on day 14, decrease M1 macrophage percentage on day 25, and doesn’t change peritoneal M2 macrophage percentage in diabetic rat model.
Life style risk factors for femoral neck fracture in Dr. Sardjito Hospital Fahry, Helmiza; Yuwana, Sugeng
Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala Ilmu Kedokteran) Vol 50, No 2 (2018)
Publisher : Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala ilmu Kedokteran)

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (310.016 KB) | DOI: 10.19106/JMedSci005002201812

Abstract

As life expentancy improved, the incidence of femoral neck fracture, as one of the mostcommon traumatic injuries in the elderly, has also increased. Risk for fracture is not onlydetermined by age and sex but also by the degree of osteoporosis and certain life-styles.The purpose of this study was to investigate life-style risk factors for femoral neck fracturein Dr. Sardjito General Hospital, Yogyakarta. In this case-control study, all patients withfemoral neck fractures admitted to the Orthopedic Division and Traumatology, Departmentof Surgery in 2013 – 2014 was included as cases. Controls were subjects withoutfracture of similar age and sex. Data of corticosteroid use, habitual coffee consumption,visual acuity disorders, habitual use of slippers and engagement in routine sport activitywere collected with questionnaires. We invited 63 patients (51 females and 12 males)and 63 controls. Corticosteroid use, habitual coffee consumption, visual acuity disorderand habitual use of slippers were risks factors for fractures, OR (95% CI) = 7.5 (2.9-21.6), p < 0.001; 7.5 (2.9-21.6), p < 0.001; 3.2 (1.6-6.8), p < 0.001 and 5.7 (2.7-12.6), p < 0.001, respectively. Engagement in routine sport activity was a protectingfactor, OR (95% CI) = 0.10 (0.02-0.33), p < 0.001. In conclusion, corticosteroid use,habitual coffee consumption, visual acuity disorder and habitual use of slippers are riskfor fractures, while engagement in routine sport is a protecting factor
The Impact of Malaria in Pregnancy on Infant Susceptibility to Malaria Infection Indrawanti, Ratni; Wijayanti, Mahardika; Hakimi, Mochamad; Juffrie, Mohammad; Kenangalem, Enny; Burdam, Faustina Helena; Triyanti, Leily; Noviyanti, Rintis; Syafruddin, Din; Ahmed, Rukhsana; ter Kuile, Feiko; Poespoprojo, Jeanne Rini
Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala Ilmu Kedokteran) Vol 50, No 2 (2018)
Publisher : Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala ilmu Kedokteran)

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (365.651 KB) | DOI: 10.19106/JMedSci005002201807

Abstract

Malaria infection during pregnancy is a significant global health problem with substantialrisks for pregnant women, her foetus, and the newborn child. Infant malaria is a majorpublic health concern in Timika, Papua. The aim of the study was to investigate the impactof malaria during pregnancy on infant’s susceptibility to malaria infections, the timing ofits occurrence, the number of malaria infections during pregnancy. This was a cohortprospective study conducted in Timika, Papua from October 2013 to September 2016.Malaria investigation was done by microscopic and PCR methods. Demographic data andmalaria status of mother-infant pairs were collected and analyzed by SPSS 22.0 version.One hundred seventy-eight infants consisting of 95 (53.37%) infants born to motherswith malaria and 83 (46.63%) without malaria 91 (51.12%) boys and 87 (48.88%) girlswere involved in the study. The mean of mothers’ ages were 25.35 ± 6.30 vs. 26.0 ±5.69 years. At the ages of 6 and 12 months, infants born to malaria positive motherswere more susceptible to malaria infections compared to infants born to malaria negativemothers with RR = 3.49; 95%CI: 1.02-11.96; p = 0.03 and RR = 8.74; 95%CI: 1.14-66.81; p = 0.01, respectively. Independent risk factors of infant susceptibility to malariainfection during the first year of life were malaria in pregnancy (MiP) in 2nd trimester (RR= 4.50; 95%CI: 1.5-13.49; p = 0.07), pregnant women who only got malaria infection1 time during pregnancy (RR=2.95; 95%CI: 1.04-8.33; p = 0.04), and Papuan ethnicity(RR=3.58; 95%CI: 1.22-10.59; p = 0.02). In conclusion, infant susceptibility to malariais associated with maternal malaria status during pregnancy. MiP in second trimester,pregnant women who only had malaria once and Papuan ethnicity were independent riskfactors for infant’s increased susceptibility to malaria infection.
Prognostic factors affecting the mortality of 2nd and 3rd degree burn injuries at a tertiary care center in Indonesia Dachlan, Ishandono; Anam, Khoirul
Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala Ilmu Kedokteran) Vol 50, No 2 (2018)
Publisher : Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala ilmu Kedokteran)

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (352.771 KB) | DOI: 10.19106/JMedSci005002201809

Abstract

About two million people suffer from burn injuries in the United States eachyear, with 100,000 hospitalized in the burn unit. Around 1000 patients sufferfrom severe burn injuries, with each year average of 300 deaths. Improvementsin the understanding of the prognostic factors affecting burn injuries over thepast decades have led to advances in medical and surgical treatment. However,comprehensive data on the factors affecting burn injuries in Indonesia havenot been available, yet. The aim of the study was to investigate the prognosticfactors affecting the mortality of 2nd and 3rd burn injuries patients in Dr. SardjitoGeneral Hospital, Yogyakarta. This was a cross-sectional study conducted withinthe period of 2007-2011 using secondary data from the Department of MedicalRecords. Chi-square and logistic regression analysis were used to evaluate thecorrelation between the prognostic factors and the mortality. A p value < 0.05(95% confidence interval) was considered to be significant. A significantlycorrelation between age, burn injuries percentage, arrival time, inhalation trauma,hemoglobin level, albumin level, creatinine level, hematocrit level and the patient’smortality was observed in this study (p<0.05). However, the cause of burn injuriesand leukocyte count had no correlation with the patient’s mortality (p>0.05).Furthermore, patients with albumin level < 3.5 mg/dL, burn injuries percentage>50%, inhalation trauma and hospitalized in 24 hours after the incident were at22.98, 7.65, 3.0 and 4.59 times higher risk of mortality, respectively (p<0.05).In conclusion, albumin level, burn injury percentage, inhalation trauma and time ofarrival are prognostic factors affecting the mortality of the burn injuries patients.
Utilization of Statins, an HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, in Ambon District Hospital, Maluku: a retrospective study Simatupang, Abraham; Huningkor, Yusuf; Gasperz, Westi C; Nindatu, Maria; Noya, Farah; Sanaky, Marliyati; Hutagalung, Inggrid; Yolanda, Denny; Kailola, Natalie
Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala Ilmu Kedokteran) Vol 50, No 2 (2018)
Publisher : Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala ilmu Kedokteran)

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (306.282 KB) | DOI: 10.19106/JMedSci005002201810

Abstract

Non-infectious diseases, including hypercholesterolemia, are now ranked top 10 inIndonesia. Statins are inhibitors of HMG-CoA reductase, an enzyme for biosynthesis ofcholesterol in the liver. Statins have been proven to reduce the risk of death due to CHDand mortality from various reasons. The objective of the study is to know the utilizationof statins in peripheral area of Indonesia. This retrospective study on utilization of statinsprescribed for hypercholesterolemia was taken from medical record year of 2014-2015of a District Hospital – Dr. Haulussy, Ambon, and Maluku. We collected demographicdata, pre- and treated concentrations of total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoproteincholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and triglyceride (TG),types and dosages of statins or other lipid-lowering medications given. Student t-testusing was performed to check statistical differences for all cholesterol and TG differencesprior to therapy versus during treatment. Eighty three respondents consisted of 26 men(31.3%) and 57 women (68.7%) with mean age 60 ± 11 years old. The pre-treatment/post-treatment values (mg/dL) of TC: 245.22 ± 51.40/224.97 ± 98.79 (p=0.004);LDL-C: 166.07 ± 45.36/146.00 ± 41.07; HDL-C: 54.52 ± 37.95/43.00 ± 0.00; andTG: 177.36 ± 103.25/121.00 ± 52.87, respectively. Seventy-nine patients (95.2%)were treated with statins. The dosage given were 10 mg (n=19, 22.9%), 20 mg (n=63, 75.9%), and 40 mg (n=1, 1.2%). Twenty-eight patients (33.7%) had no posttreatmentdata of cholesterol, and 31 out of 55 patients (56%) were responders. Allcholesterol levels were decreased, but responder rate was only 56%. Therefore, dosageadjustment and prerequisite cholesterol level during and post-treatment measurementshould be made regularly.
Neonatal outcomes in In vitro fertilization (IVF) pregnancies Buchori, Muhammad; Patria, Suryono Yudha; Wibowo, Tunjung; Hanoum, Ita Fauzia
Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala Ilmu Kedokteran) Vol 50, No 2 (2018)
Publisher : Journal of the Medical Sciences (Berkala ilmu Kedokteran)

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (332.778 KB) | DOI: 10.19106/JMedSci005002201805

Abstract

small-for-gestational age (SGA), and low birth weight (LBW) rates are approximately twiceas high in IVF pregnancies than in natural pregnancies. The IVF procedures have becomemore routine in recent years in Indonesia, but there have been few assessments ofneonatal outcomes. The study aimed to evaluate the risk of preterm birth, SGA, and LBWin IVF infants. This was a retrospective cohort study performed in Dr. Sardjito GeneralHospital, Yogyakarta from January 2012 to December 2016. Pre-coded questionnaireswere used to collect data from medical records. The relative risk of preterm birth, SGA,and LBW among IVF infants were calculated and compared to naturally conceived infants.A total sampling method was used for the IVF infants and a simple random samplingmethod was used for naturally conceived infants, who were born on the same day as aninfant in the IVF group.A total of 108 infants were recruited, consisting of 54 IVF infants and 54 naturallyconceived infants. The IVF infants had increased risk of preterm birth (RR = 2.0; 95%CI0.52 - 7.58) and LBW (RR = 1.25; 95%CI 0.53 - 2.92). However, the IVF infants didnot have an increased risk of SGA (RR = 1.0; 95%CI 0.21 - 4.73). In conclusion, therisk of preterm birth and LBW in IVF infants are higher than in naturally conceived infants,but not statistically significant. However, there is no increased risk of SGA in IVF infants.

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