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INDONESIA
BEYOND WORDS
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Core Subject : Education, Social,
A journal on language education, applied linguistics and curriculum & instructions
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 110 Documents
THE LINGUISTIC PERSPECTIVES ONCOMPUTER MEDIATED COMMUNICATION Chong, Larry Dwan
Beyond Words Vol 8, No 1 (2020): May
Publisher : Widya Mandala Catholic University Surabaya

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.33508/bw.v8i1.2366

Abstract

This paper aims to explore the role of production and perception constraints in computer mediated communication. I review Lindblom's (1990) theory of phonetic variation and propose a new model of linguistic production in Computer Mediated Communication. Cyber citizens use cyber communication as conceptually oral, medially written. The reason to use chat-mode is that it saves time and space (the principle of least effort); here sound, not spelling, is the first thing to be considered. With respect to production in the proposed model, effort is no longer equated with articulatory movement, but rather with the number of keystrokes involved in typing an utterance. On discussing online, discussants show paralinguistic actions such as smile, frown, screaming, etc., and they also reduplicate writings, capitalize all the sentences, and use emoticons; net-communication is headed toward less grammatical and more telegraphic type. The production of hyper-and hypo-forms such as reduplication, punctuation and capitalization will vary according to the sender's estimation of signal-complementary processes and his attempts to compensate for the restricted context.We discuss online and off line on the issues; why we like cyber communication and how we classify the phenomena. The more computer mediated communications we use, the moreissues we have to review beyond words and linguistic principles.
HELPING STUDENTS CREATE THEIR OWN BOOKS THE DIALOGIC WAY Jacobs, George
Beyond Words Vol 8, No 1 (2020): May
Publisher : Widya Mandala Catholic University Surabaya

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.33508/bw.v8i1.2354

Abstract

This article explores one technique that is consistent with the student-centered paradigm in language education: student-generated books. First, benefits of student-generated are dis-cussed. Then, the article explores the crucial area of maintaining student ownership of their own books. The next topic explained in the article is why dialog is important as the students are developing their books. Finally, it is suggested that book creation works for students of all ages and levels, with examples given of students at the early childhood level and of second language students at university level.
THE EFFECT OF STORY READING ON INCIDENTAL LEXICAL AND GRAMMATICAL COLLOCATION LEARNING BY IRANIAN EFL LEARNERS Naderi, Mina; Barani, Fatemeh
Beyond Words Vol 8, No 1 (2020): May
Publisher : Widya Mandala Catholic University Surabaya

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.33508/bw.v8i1.2126

Abstract

The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of story reading on incidental lexical and grammatical collocation learning. Moreover, it was an attempt to scrutinize whether there was any significant difference between incidental lexical and grammatical collocation learning. To this end, 36 Iranian EFL learners attending Sadra English Institute in Yasuj participated in the study. They were selected based on the result of quick placement test (QPT) as 28 out of 36 elementary EFL learners. A total of 28 learners were assigned into one experimental group (n=15) and one control group (n=13). The result of the pre-test and post-test analysis using One-Way ANCOVA and MANCOVA revealed the fact that that there was statistically significant increase in collocation knowledge of the learners. In addition, participants performed significantly on grammatical post-test than lexical post-test after the treatment.
Critical Pedagogy in TESL/TEFL: How Far Can We Go? Yumarnamto, Mateus
BEYOND WORDS Vol 1, No 1 (2013)
Publisher : Widya Mandala Catholic University Surabaya

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (175.779 KB)

Abstract

In this post-method era, perspectives and stances gain momentum as postmodernist’ educators highlight teachers’ agency in transforming the students and the society. In this framework, this paper discusses two approaches in teaching English as a second or foreign language (TESL/TEFL). The first perspective is critical pedagogy and the second is pragmatic pedagogy. By discussing the two important perspectives, this paper aims at understanding the path for better practices, both in research and teaching in TESL/TEFL. More importantly, it also discusses its relevance to teaching English in Indonesian.
Encouraging Second Language Use in Cooperative Learning Groups Jacobs, George M; Kimura, Harumi
BEYOND WORDS Vol 1, No 1 (2013)
Publisher : Widya Mandala Catholic University Surabaya

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (0.036 KB)

Abstract

This article presents, explains and organizes ideas for promoting students’ use of their second language (this term includes foreign language) when they work together in cooperative learning groups. The first part of the article reviews arguments as to whether students of second languages should be encouraged to use their second language with classmates when doing group activities. These arguments are discussed with reference to Second Language Acquisition (SLA) theory. Practical issues are also explored. Next, the majority of the article presents ideas on how to promote second language use during peer interaction. Twenty-nine of these ideas are explained. The ideas are organized into five categories: a role for the L1; understanding the issue; creating a conducive climate; providing language support; and the task. It is recommended that teachers use ideas from the literature on cooperative learning when they ask students to interact.
English Tsunami in Indonesian Sadtono, E.
BEYOND WORDS Vol 1, No 1 (2013)
Publisher : Widya Mandala Catholic University Surabaya

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (0.036 KB)

Abstract

English has successfully overwhelmed Indonesian like tsunami as an imperialistic language. The meaning of imperialism here, however, differs from the conventional meaning as it is invited imperialism, not coerced imperialism.The influence of English in Indonesian is discussed in terms of modernization, globalization, economy, and history. The linguistic tsunami effects are overwhelming, staggering, and unstoppable. The data for this article were collected from various sources, and it was found that the number of English words (pure and modified) is indeed confounding. Virtually English words have penetrated all walks of life. Unfortunately, there is no way we can prevent English influence on Indonesian, it is simply inevitable and we cannot do anything about it. Seen from linguistic purism, we have lost the battle in fighting off English influence; but seen from the eye of a descriptive linguist, it is an unpreventable historical phenomenon. It is a lingusitic dynamism in which language is altered and enriched by a continuous input from other languages, the most influential language being the major donor of loanwords of the receiving language. If it is considered a problem, the solution is to change our attitude to realize that any living language continues undergoing modifications and we should be willing to accommodate them. It is the dialectics of world history.
Motivational Implications of Heritage Language Identity for Heritage Language Learning Berardi-Wiltshire, Arianna
BEYOND WORDS Vol 1, No 1 (2013)
Publisher : Widya Mandala Catholic University Surabaya

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (242.597 KB)

Abstract

The article discusses the significance of elements of Italian identity (Italianità) for the language learning motivation of learners of Italian descent studying their heritage language (HL) by means of foreign language (FL) courses in Wellington, New Zealand. Adopting a social constructivist perspective on both second language learning and the motivational processes underlying it, the study utilizes qualitative data collected through waves of semi-structured interviews from five case-study participants to map the influence that their constructions of Italianità exert on their motivational trajectories over the course of several months of learning. The paper discusses a selection of data excerpts to show how motivational fluctuations are the result of the learners’ own processing of and reaction to elements of their sociocultural context. In particular, an analysis of the learners’ accounts of social exchanges and other crucial events involving the use of the HL outside the classroom will illustrate how these can support motivation by reinforcing the learners’ perceptions of their Italianità, strengthening existing learning goals and/or prompting the formation of new ones. The article concludes with some remarks on the implications for teaching practices and extra-curricular activities that could benefit HL learners by increasing their exposure to the HL outside the classroom while validating and encouraging the personal identity constructions and ambitions at the basis of their learning.
Using Students’ Authentic Writings to Teach an Apprenticeship Report Datu, Yerly A.
BEYOND WORDS Vol 1, No 1 (2013)
Publisher : Widya Mandala Catholic University Surabaya

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (242.608 KB)

Abstract

An Apprenticeship Report as one of the obligatory products that students of Business English of Politeknik Ubaya have to produce becomes an important requirement since, during the writing process, it also involves the company where the students undergo the apprenticeship in their last semester. Having examined their writings, I found quite troublesome linguistic accuracy in their writings. Due to these most frequently occurring errors, I was finally triggered to make use their authentic writings as my teaching sources. Then, to follow up, I intentionally collected their works to be selected to be the teaching sources as I believed that bringing authenticity in the classroom produce positive feedback and substantial language learning (Reid, 1993: 177). Therefore, in this paper, I discussed further about the use of authentic materials and approaches in teaching writing using authentic materials. To obtain information whether authentic materials gave positive responses from the students or not, a set of questionnaire was distributed to them in all stages; pre-, whilst-, and post-writing. Overall results have shown positive responses from the students as they were exposed to their seniors’ authentic writings and experienced authentic-materials-based activities which I designed purposely for them.
The Correlation between the Writing Ability and Self-esteem of Surabaya Merchant Marine Academy Students Dias, Agata
BEYOND WORDS Vol 1, No 1 (2013)
Publisher : Widya Mandala Catholic University Surabaya

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (304.049 KB)

Abstract

Writing in EFL has been an essential requirement for Students of Surabaya Merchant Marine Academy because it is used when they are on board. Even though it is compulsory, the writing progress is unsatisfactory. Recent studies widely investigate and find the correlation between affective factors in learning, especially self-esteem, and student’s writing improvements. Following the issues, the present study investigated the correlation between Surabaya Merchant Marine Academy students’ English writing progress and their self-esteem. The data were collected using two instruments; Test of English Writing (TEW) and Questionnaire of Self-esteem (QSE) which covers three sections of questionnaire; global, situational and task self-esteem. The instruments were distributed to 107 students. Then the data were analyzed using Pearson Product Moment. Results of the study revealed that the overall scores of TEW indicated that the level of the student’s writing ability was fair; the highest correlation level appeared between situational self-esteem and writing ability and the lowest correlation level appeared between global self-esteem and writing ability, and finally the correlation between self-esteem and writing ability of the students was significantly positive.
EFL Secondary Students’ Perceptions on Native and Nonnative English-Speaking Teachers Tjokrokanoko, Angelia; Tedjasuksmana, Hendra
BEYOND WORDS Vol 1, No 1 (2013)
Publisher : Widya Mandala Catholic University Surabaya

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (0.036 KB)

Abstract

This study examined the secondary students’ perceptions towards NESTs and NNESTs in an English course in Surabaya regarding the teachers’ teaching competence, cultural knowledge of English language teaching, teaching style, and classroom management. Most secondary students perceived both teacher groups were good at most categories. Using questionnaires distributed to 96 secondary school students of an English course who participated in this study, the researchers found that 38 students took part in doing a focus group interview. The interview was done to capture deeper perceptions that could be gained. The study reported that cultural knowledge of the English language teachers, especially the NESTs, exceeded that of the NNESTs. This research finding also proved that students perceived NESTs to be as good as NNESTs in such areas as teaching grammar, listening, reading, and writing. Furthermore, both NESTs and NNESTs were perceived to be not able to understand the students’ special needs since teachers at the the English course under study handled one level for about twelve meetings only.

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