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Ahmadi Riyanto
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INDONESIA
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner
ISSN : 08537380     EISSN : 2252696X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
Aims JITV (Jurnal Ilmu ternak dan Veteriner) or Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences (IJAVS) aims to publish original research results and reviews on farm tropical animals such as cattle, buffaloes, sheep, goats, pigs, horses, poultry, as well as non domesticated Indonesian endemic animals, such as deers, anoa, babirusa, etc. Scope Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences . The journal will consider primary research papers from any source if they make an original contribution to the experimental or theoretical understanding and application of theories and methodologies of some aspects of animal science and veterinary
Articles 1,672 Documents
SUPPLEMENTATION OF BLACK SOLDIER FLY (HERMETIA ILLUCENS) ON ACTIVITY AND CAPACITY PHAGOCYTIC MACROPHAGE OF LAYING HENS Irawan, Andri Cahya
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 24, No 4 (2019): December 2019
Publisher : Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD)

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v24i4.2025

Abstract

Black Soldier Fly are natural antibiotics. It is expected that the use of BSF larvae in poultry rations as an alternative source of conventional protein will contribute to improving the immune status and maintaining animal health, thereby reducing the use of antibiotic growth promoters (AGPs). This study aimed to evaluate the effect of the best type of BSF protein for determining the health status of laying hens based on the activity and capacity of macrophage phagocytosis on the non-protein A bacterium Staphyllococcus aureus. Results of this study indicated that the BSF extract (P3) has the highest phagocytic capacity value. This result proves that the BSF extract can induce macrophage cells to optimally process bacterial cells or foreign phagocyte particles. The highest average activity value, and phagocytic capacity of peritoneal macrophages was resulted from BSF extract (P3), respectively was 91.34 ± 0.38% and 22.84 macrophage-1 bacteria.
RHIZOPUS OLIGOSPORUS ACTIVITY IN CRUDE EXTRACT AND POWDER FORM TO REDUCE ASPERGILLUS FLAVUS AND AFLATOXIN CONTAMINATION IN CORN Kusumaningtyas, Eni; Masrianti, -; Fitrya, F
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 24, No 4 (2019): December 2019
Publisher : Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD)

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v24i4.2078

Abstract

Rhizopus oligosporus (RO) in isolate culture was known to reduce contamination toxigenic mold Aspergillus flavus (AF) and aflatoxin B1 in chicken feed. Application in culture form was not effective. The aim of this research was to evaluate RO activities in extract and inoculum form to reduce contamination of AF and aflatoxin B1 in corn. RO was harvested from agar plate, blended, added with water (ratio 1:1 (w/v)) and centrifuged. Supernatant was filtered using Whatman 41. Inoculum was made by inoculation RO in soy powder and incubated at 28oC for 5 days. Inoculum was dried at 40oC for 24-28 hours. Assay was conducted by addition extract or inoculum to corn. Extract and corn ratio were 1:1 (v/w), while inoculum doses were 5, 25, 50, 1000 dan 200 g/kg corn. Assay for aflatoxin B1 was done using kit ELISA aflatoxin. The result of this research showed that extract was able to reduce AF contamination up to 1 log 10, while the less concentration of inoculum which able to inhibit AF up to 6 log 10 was 100 g/kg corn. Extract RO 125 and 250 mL/kg corn was able to reduce aflatoxin contamination by 93.69 % and 85.84 %. Inoculum at dose 5 and 100 g/kg corn was able to reduce aflatoxin 57.58% and 85%. Based on the result, it could be concluded that RO in extract or inoculum form was able to reduce contamination of AF and aflatoxin B1 in corn. Rhizopus as inoculum was easier to be applied than in extract form.
THE USE OF COFFEE HUSK AS NAPIER GRASS SUBSTITUTION AND ITS EFFECT ON MADURA CATTLE PERFORMANCE Sudarman, Asep; Listiawan, G B; Khodijah, L
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 24, No 4 (2019): December 2019
Publisher : Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD)

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v24i4.2006

Abstract

This research aimed to evaluate the performance of fattened madura cattle fed on coffee husk as a source of fibre to substitute grasses. Twenty Madura steers aged approximately 1.5 to 2.0 years with initial weight of 165-190 kg were divided randomly into four different experimental diets, namely R0= 90% concentrates +0% coffee husk +10% napier grass, R1= 90 % concentrates +3.33% coffee husk +6.67% napier grass, R2 = 90% concentrate +10% 6.67% coffee husk +3.33% napier grass, R3 = 90% concentrates 90% + 10% coffee husk +0% napier grass. The feed was given at 3% body weight of dry mater. The cows were kept in individual pen for two months. Variables measured were dry mater intake, feed efficiency, average daily gain (ADG), digestibility of feed and income over feed cost. Data obtained were analyzed using analysis of variance based on randomized block design followed by Duncan?s multiple range test. Results showed that dry matter intake, ADG, feed efficiency and feed digestibility of cattle on each treatment of the feed were not significantly different (P > 0.05). Average of dry matter intake and daily gain for R0, R1, R2, and R3 were 6.01, 5.84, 5.73 and 5.62 kg/head/day and 0.88, 0.87, 0.84 and 0.93 kg/head/day respectively. While the average of feed efficiency and DM digestibility for R0, R1, R2, and R3 were 14.64, 14.89, 14.65 and 16.54 % and 84.82, 84.37, 83.47 and 83.30 %, respectively. It is concluded that the used of 10% coffee husk as a source of fibre for substitution of napier grass can be used without negative effect on madura?s cattle performances and tend to give higher values of IOFC on fattening program.
Effect of Electrical Stimulation on Physical and Organoleptic Properties of Muscovy Duck Meat Hafid, Harapin; Napirah, A; Sarifu, SM; Rahman, .; Inderawati, .; Nuraini, .; Hasnudi, .
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 23, No 4 (2018): DECEMBER 2018
Publisher : Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD)

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (263.04 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v23i4.1914

Abstract

This research was aimed to study the effect of electrical stimulation period on physical and organoleptic properties of Muscovy duck meat. This research used 20 female Muscovy ducks, 1.5-2 years of age. The ducks were divided into 5 groups treatments for 4 replications. The treatments were period of electrical stimulation: 0, 5, 10, 15, and 20 minutes. The result showed that period of electrical stimulation did not affect (P>0.05) cooking loss but significantly affected (P<0.05) the tenderness, color, flavour, aroma, pH, and juiciness of duck meat. The best treatment was 20 minutes stimulation.
Estimating Breeding values for milk production and mastitis traits for Holstein cattle in Egypt Faid-Allah, Eslam
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 23, No 4 (2018): DECEMBER 2018
Publisher : Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD)

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (218.317 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v23i4.1845

Abstract

This study was carried out to evaluate the sires and dams genetically for milk production and mastitis traits in Egyptian 12 herds of Holstein cattle using Best Linear Unbiased Prediction via MTDFREML program. The data was obtained from a commercial farm called Dena, located in Cairo-Alex Desert Road (80 Km), Menofia, Egypt. Data included 4791 cows, 4227 dams and 248 sires that represented the period from 2007 to 2014. Estimating breeding values for milk production traits as cumulative milk yield at 90 days (90-DM), cumulative milk yield at 180 days (180-DM), cumulative milk yield at 270 days (270-DM), cumulative milk yield at 305 days (305-DM), and number of mastitis infection around the season of lactation (MAST). The averages of the 90-DM, 180-DM, 270-DM, 305-DM and MAST were 3026.3±655.1 kg, 5873.3±1081.1 kg, 7891.1±2692.2 kg, 9611.2±1897.9 kg, and 0.712±1.2 time/parity, respectively. Estimates of heritability for the previous traits were 0.11±0.016, 0.15±0.014, 0.18±0.012, 0.22±0.015, and 0.09±0.029, respectively; genetic variance were 47206.2 kg, 175300.6 kg, 1304654.4 kg, 792411.6 kg and 0.12 time/parity, respectively; and phenotypic variance were 429147.6 kg, 1168670.6 kg, 7248079.9 kg, 3601870.9 kg, and 1.35 time/parity, respectively. The EBV values as average, SD, (Min: Max) for sires were 0.0±0.179 (-0.4: 0.66) for MAST, 0.0±86.176 (-263.1: 245.4) for 90-DM, 0.0±227.523 (-600.3: 800.3) for 180-DM, 0.0±413.48 (-323.3: 1277.7) for 270-DM and 0.0±440.26 (-1280.9: 1565.1) for 305-DM. Also, The EBVs for dams were 0.0±0.055 (-0.14: 0.45) for MAST, 0.033±26.24 (-142.8: 103.0) for 90-DM, 0.074±76.81 (-360.2: 289.6) for 180-DM, -0.045±139.66 (-591.9: 529.2) for 270-DM and 0.266±154.1 (-666.3: 617.6) for 305-DM. These results provide that the selection of sires and dams will improve the traits of milk production and mastitis in this herd because of the wide differences in genetic potential among sires and dams.
Serum Biochemical, Hormonal and Fatty Acid Profiles During the Late Gestation of Pregnancy Ketosis in Boer Cross Goats Affan, A. A.; Amirul, FMA; Ghani, AAA; Annas, S; Zamri-Saad, M; Hassim, HA
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 23, No 4 (2018): DECEMBER 2018
Publisher : Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD)

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (565.317 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v23i4.1922

Abstract

Pregnancy ketosis has been recognized as one of the common metabolic disease affecting goat’s meat and milk production. For the present study, sixteen (n=16) individuals of pregnant does at day 80 of pregnancy had been used. A total of 8 does were categorized as control group (healthy pregnant goats), were fed on Napier grass and goat concentrate with water ad libitum, and another 8 does were considered as treatment group which categorized as ketosis based on the clinical signs and presence of ketone body in urine. Blood sample were collected from all goats for biochemical profiles analysis which were glucose, Beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHBA), free fatty acid (FFA), calcium, electrolytes (sodium, potassium, chloride), liver enzyme and hormonal levels (cortisol and insulin). Three does from each group were slaughtered and liver samples were collected for fatty acid profiles study. In this study, the BHBA, FFA, calcium, amino aspartate transferase (AST), gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT) and cortisol hormone were significantly higher in pregnancy ketosis goats as compared to control group. Meanwhile, the concentration of glucose, sodium, potassium, chloride and insulin hormones were lower in pregnancy ketosis goats as compared to control. Furthermore, the fatty acid composition in blood plasma of pregnant goat with ketosis showed higher level of palmitic, stearic and oleic acid, while in liver, palmitic, oleic and linoleic acid was found higher.
Improvement of Viability of Lactobacillus casei and Bifidobacterium longum with Several Encapsulating Materials using Extrusion Method Widaningrum, .; Miskiyah, .; Indrasti, D; Hidaya, HC
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 23, No 4 (2018): DECEMBER 2018
Publisher : Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD)

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (448 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v23i4.1547

Abstract

Lactobacillus casei and Bifidobacterium longum are probiotics commonly applied as dry starter for food system. Drying process in the production of dry starter can reduce the number of probiotics, therefore they are necessary to be encapsulated. Aim of this research was to obtain best encapsulating material for both probiotics. Encapsulation technique used in this research was extrusion with maltodextrine-alginate, sago starch-alginate, corn starch-alginate, and control of treatment skim milk-alginate (w:w) as encapsulating materials.  The four encapsulating materials significantly affected the value of viability, encapsulation efficiency, number of cell in wet beads and dry beads, number of survival cell during drying process, and number of survival encapsulated cell in simulated acid and bile salt conditions. Based on viability of L. casei and B. longum, beads matrix characteristic, number of cell in wet beads and dry beads, and number of survival cells during drying process, maltodextrine-alginate was better than sago starch-alginate and corn starch-alginate, but was not as good as skim milk-alginate (control of treatment) as encapsulating material. Viability (number) of L. casei and B. longum in dry beads of maltodextrine-alginate were 4.69±0.08 log CFU/g and 5.32±0.21 log CFU/g, while number of L. casei and B. longum in dry beads of skim milk-alginate were higher 5.08±0.07 log CFU/g and 6.20±0.16 log CFU/g. L. casei more resistant than B. longum against acidic (low pH) environment. In the presence of 0.3% bile salt, L. casei and B. longum encapsulated with skim milk-alginate increased as much as 2.75±0. 02 and 1.61±0.04 log cycles, respectively.
Adjustment factors of birth weight and four postnatal weights for type of birth and rearing, sex of lambs and dam age ., Subandryo; Vogt, D.W
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 1, No 1 (1995)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1154.744 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v1i1.1

Abstract

Many factors contribute to variation in lamb weights . Factors such as age of lamb, sex, type of birth and rearing, and ewe age at lambing obscure genetic differences among lambs . Variation associated with these factors make selection for increased weight less effective . To improve selection response, selection must be based on genotypic rather than environmentally induced superiority . It is well-documented that corrections for classifiable sources of variation render selection and culling more accurate, thereby increasing rates of genetic improvement . The objective of this study were to develop within breed adjustment factors for post-natal lamb weights . Field records from Suffolk and Dorset lambs collected in the U.S . National Sheep Improvement Program (NSIP) from 1986 through 1989 were used to develop within-breed birth/rearing type, lamb sex, and dam age adjustment factors for birth weight (BW) and 30-d (W3o), 60-d (Woo), 90-d (W9o), and 120-4 (Wtm) weights. Data were analyzed using general linear models . Within breed and age group adjustment for lamb-age differences were suggested because growth rates vary among breeds and among the four postnatal lamb-age groups . Within-breed multiplicative adjustment of the five traits for the effects of birth/rearing type, lamb sex and dam age were suggested because variances of these factors were significantly (P<0.01) heterogenous   Key words: Sheep, adjustment factors, birth weight, postnatal weights
Productive performance of sheep under intensification program using a twice yearly lambing schedule Putu, I. Gede
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 1, No 1 (1995)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (174.061 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v1i1.2

Abstract

A total of 350, three to four year old Daldale ewes were allocated into two treatment groups balanced for age and liveweight. Group TY was joined twice yearly (April-May and September-October) and group OY was joined once yearly (April-May). Three percent of fertile rams fitted with ewe marking crayons and harnesses were used in each group during the six weeks joining period. The productive performance were recorded during three years period. The average raddling rate, lambing rate and number of lambs born per ewe in the TY group were signicantly higher than those of the OY group (P<0.05). However, birth weight, weaning weight and pre-weaning growth rate of the lambs born from the TY group were significantly lighter than those of the OY group (P<0.05). There was no significant difference on wool production between the TY and OY groups (P>0.05). Total weaning weight of lambs horn from both the TY and OY groups for the first, second and third year of research were 2.29 vs 2.49 tons, 2.50 vs 2.63 tons and 1.43 vs 2.34 tons, respectively. It was concluded that the Daldale ewes showed a high proportion of oestrual activity in all year round indicating their suitability for the use in the intensification of sheep husbandry. However, the twice yearly lambing program is still need further research particlularly in selecting breed and other supporting factors.   Key words : Sheep, productive intensification, twice yearly lambing
The effect of feeding gliricidia on reproductive and productive performances of Javanese Fat-tailed sheep ., Supriyati; Budiarsana, I.G.M; Saefudin, Yosep; Sutama, I. Ketut
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 1, No 1 (1995)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (488.05 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v1i1.3

Abstract

The effect of feeding gliricidia on reproductive and productive performances of Javanese Fat-tailed (JFT) sheep was studied.Thirty-two 1FT ewe lambs (ahmtt 4-5 months of age and liveweight of 12-14 kg) were randomly divided into four treatment groups . They were given free access of King grass (Pennisetttnt putrtoreophoides) dan gliricidia (Gliricidia sepiwn, Jaeq) leaf with ratio 100:0% (Group A= control), 75 :25% (Group B), 50 :50% (Group C), and 0:100% (Group D) . All groups were suplemented with concentrate (GT03, Indofeed) at 1008/head/day. Forages were given 2 .5-3% (dry-matter) of liveweight . Results showed that feeding gliricidia 25-100% of the total forages increased dry matter intake by 5.3-19 .9% and crude protein 39 .3-142 .1 % . But NDF consumption decreased 36 .9-8 .4%. Higher nutrient intake was reflected into an increase in growth-rate which associated with an increase inovulation rate (16.7-116 .7%) and pregnancy rate. "Ova wastage" decreased markedly (33.4-50.3%) in the groups given gliricidia 50-100%, though coumarine (anti-nutrient) consumption increased to 40 .78/head/day . Lanths from the gliricidia supplemented groups grew faster and had heavier weaning weights than those of control group . It was rmu luded that feeding gliricidia up to 1(10% as forages and concentrate GT03 at 100g/head/day gave positive effect on growth-rate, relinxluclive and productive erformauces in the first breeding of JFT sheep. Key words: Sheep, gliricidia, reproduction

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