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INDONESIA
Journal of Indonesian Economy and Business
ISSN : 20858272     EISSN : 23385847     DOI : -
Core Subject : Economy,
Journal of Indonesian Economy and Business (JIEB) is open access, peer-reviewed journal whose objectives is to publish original research papers related to the Indonesian economy and business issues. This journal is also dedicated to disseminating the published articles freely for international academicians, researchers, practitioners, regulators, and public societies. The journal welcomes author from any institutional backgrounds and accepts rigorous empirical or theoretical research paper with any methods or approach that is relevant to the Indonesian economy and business content, as long as the research fits one of three salient disciplines: economics, business, or accounting.
Articles 8 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 26, No 1 (2011): January" : 8 Documents clear
PUBLIC SECTOR EFFICIENCY IN INDONESIA (FISCAL DECENTRALIZATION ERA, 2001 –2008 Kirana, Mayanggita; Saleh, Samsubar
Journal of Indonesian Economy and Business Vol 26, No 1 (2011): January
Publisher : Journal of Indonesian Economy and Business

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Abstract

While many developing countries have devolved public responsibilities to local governments in recent years, some studies have examined whether decentralizationactually leads to greater public sector allocation efficiency. This paper approaches this question by assessing the efficiency of government expenditure on public sector underfiscal decentralization. The area of public expenditure is of great importance making the findings have strong implications with regard to public sector efficiency.We compute public sector performance (PSP) and public sector efficiency (PSE) indicators, comprising of composite and 9 sub indicators, for 33 provinces in Indonesia.The first 6 sub indicators are opportunity indicators that take into account education, health outcomes, poverty, gender equality, quality of public infrastructure (transportationand energy). 3 order indicators reflect the standard musgravian tasks for the government: allocation, distribution, and stabilization. The input and output efficiency of public sectors across provinces is then measured using a non-parametric production frontier technique.Free Disposable Hull (FDH) analysis is used to estimate the extent of slack in government expenditures. The study finds significant differences in PSP and PSE, which suggests alarge potential for expenditure savings in many provinces. All these findings suggest diminishing marginal products of higher public spending.We also estimate a semi parametric model of the public sector production process by regressing FDH analysis output scores on non discretionary variables using the Tobit procedure. We show that inefficiency is strongly related to GDP per capita, human development index, and degree of fiscal dependence. The central message of this paper is that increasing budgetary allocations for public sector may not be the only or most effective way to increase public sector outcome, and that more attention should be given to increasing the efficiency of expenditure.Keywords: fiscal decentralization public sector performance, public sector efficiency, free disposable hull, Tobit
GLANCING METEOR SHOWER OVER INDONESIA: VOLATILITY SPILLOVERS FROM A MAJOR STOCK MARKET TO INDONESIAN STOCK MARKET AND CURRENCY Setiastuti, Sekar Utami
Journal of Indonesian Economy and Business Vol 26, No 1 (2011): January
Publisher : Journal of Indonesian Economy and Business

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Abstract

During the deepest financial crisis in mid 2007-2009, increasing volatility of Indonesian stock market index were captured. Increasing volatility of the series is acommon event since the volatility of financial market around the globe is increasing likewise. Yet, whether it is a sign of volatility spillover or comovement still emerges as amystery.This paper seeks to explain the causes of the increasing volatility in domestic currency and stock market. To investigates the hypothesis in tranquil and crisis periods, theobservation period of January 2, 2003 to May 31, 2010 is splitted into two sub-periods with different levels of volatility. Using VAR-EGARCH on daily stock market index of Indonesia (IDX), S&P 500, and the bilateral exchange rate, we documented the existence of meteor shower and heatwaves in Indonesia stock market and exchange rate during crisis period. This finding implies that in crisis period, Indonesian stock market and exchange rate volatility were not only affected by market specific factors, but were alsoaffected by volatility of the major stock market. We also captured asymmetric affects in the model which suggests that negative shock in the major stock market will increase the volatility of domestic stock market more than positive shock will.Keywords: volatility spillovers, comovement, contagion, VAR-EGARCH
THE IMPACT OF REDDI ON INSTITUTIONS INCOME: A SOCIAL ACCOUNTING MATRIX APPROACH Ulya, Nur Arifatul
Journal of Indonesian Economy and Business Vol 26, No 1 (2011): January
Publisher : Journal of Indonesian Economy and Business

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Abstract

Indonesia is one of the three largest tropical forest countries. Indonesias forest area is about 120.35 million hectares or about 60% of Indonesia’s land area. Indonesia’s forest is not only important for the people of Indonesia both in terms of its ecologic and economic role, but also important for the global environment, particularly in relation to climate change. Forests could become carbon storage in large quantities, but also can be a source of carbon emissions.Indonesias forests currently facing problems of deforestation and degradation, which contributed approximately 20% of global CO2 emissions, so that the Indonesian government put a high attention on the issue of REDD (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation). REDD schemes is expected to assist Indonesia in reducing deforestation and forest degradation for forest sustainability and provide economic income from carbon trading.This paper aims to identify the impact of carbon trading under Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation in Indonesia (REDDI) scheme on income ofinstitutions that consist of households, companies and government using the Social Accounting Matrix (SAM) approach. Accounting multiplier is used to calculate the impact of REDDI scheme on institutions income in the year 2005.The results indicate that the impact of REDDI on institution income for the minimum scenario is U.S.$ 0.68 billion whereas for the maximum scenario is U.S. $. 28.86 billionREDDI give the greatest impact on households’ income (59.66%) than followed companies (28.17%) and government (12.17%).Keywords: carbon trading, deforestation, degradation, forest
THE GLOBAL ECONOMIC CRISIS AND ITS IMPACT ON INDONESIA’S EDUCATION Kuncoro, Mudrajad
Journal of Indonesian Economy and Business Vol 26, No 1 (2011): January
Publisher : Journal of Indonesian Economy and Business

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Abstract

This paper will examine to what extent the unprecedented global financial crisis has affected the Indonesia’s economy. The differences between Indonesia’s experience of theglobal financial crisis (GFC) and Asian Financial Crisis (AFC) in 1997–98 will be illuminated. The government’s priority on the development of education— together with achieving quality growth, reducing poverty, creating jobs, improving infrastructure— have accelerated the economic recovery and improved key indicators in education. Despitebudgetary adjustments, the Indonesian government continues to prioritize investment in education. As a result, the GFC has not affected number of students in Indonesiasignificantly. The GFC has not affected the interest of students to get higher education at the Indonesia’s universities. Keywords: global financial crisis, Asian financial crisis investment, economic recovery
THE BUSINESS PERSPECTIVES STRATEGY TOWARDS THE TKI (INDONESIAN MIGRANT WORKERS) MARKET Sihombing, Haeryip; Yaakob, Moh. Yuhazri; Safarudin, Mochamad
Journal of Indonesian Economy and Business Vol 26, No 1 (2011): January
Publisher : Journal of Indonesian Economy and Business

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Abstract

The business prospects and opportunities of the migrant workers’ (TKI) market are still wide open. This is shown by the year to year remittances incremental of TKI thatcorresponds to the beneficial opportunity of the business players to optimize their exploration of this market. In reality, the current efforts and strategy in this exploration,however, are still not utilised effectively in terms of competitive advantage. Therefore the initiative strategy towards product differentiation and innovation of the offered service should be explored and optimised based on the sustainable beneficial prospects for the business. As described briefly in this paper through a case of business innovation towards differentiation, the proposed strategies such as localization and two-sided markets are required for business organisations to unlock their product innovation strategies towards TKI (as their customer) through the innovative solution against the poverty.Keywords: TKI, remittance, poverty, differentiated, solution
COMPARATIVE STUDY OF THE ECONOMIC DETERMINANTS OF FOREIGN DIRECT INVESTMENT IN PAKISTAN, INDIA AND INDONESIA Azam, Muhammad
Journal of Indonesian Economy and Business Vol 26, No 1 (2011): January
Publisher : Journal of Indonesian Economy and Business

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Abstract

In this study an attempt has been made to investigate the effects of economic factors on foreign direct investment (FDI) inflows into Pakistan, India and Indonesia. Simple loglinear regression model for each country has been used and the method of least squares has been applied. Empirical results show that market size, domestic investment, tradeopenness, and physical infrastructure are the important economic determinants of FDI.Further, this study also found that the empirical results of the economic determinants of India matched with empirical results of Pakistan except two determinates (i.e., tradeopenness and government consumption), while that of Indonesia do not match with Pakistan and India. For attracting more FDI into Pakistan and India, the management authorities’ needs to ensure economic and political stability, provision of infrastructure, peace and security, encouraging domestic investment and adoption of appropriate macroeconomic stabilization policy. Furthermore, this study recommend the same measures for Indonesia and suggest that more future research work are required for empirical investigation of determinants of FDI in Indonesia, to enhance the desirable level of FDI into the country.Keywords: foreign direct investment, Pakistan, India, Indonesia
LOCAL OWN REVENUE MOBILIZATION IN INDONESIA Mahi, B. Raksaka
Journal of Indonesian Economy and Business Vol 26, No 1 (2011): January
Publisher : Journal of Indonesian Economy and Business

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Abstract

Decentralization policy in Indonesia has given an increase of authority to local government in managing their own local finance. One of the characteristics of the decentralization policy is to increase local taxing power, with the objective to optimize local own revenue in supporting local spending. Given the current data observation, it is obvious that many local governments do not have significant local own revenue to support their local spending. This paper-adopting tax elasticity method-attempts to evaluate the present local own revenue optimization. Furthermore, by adopting a decomposition of tax elasticity, this paper also attempts to elaborate factors affecting local own revenuecollection.The estimated local own revenue elasticity show that most taxes and user charges, which are the main sources of local own revenue, are considered not a buoyant tax. Moreanalysis using a decomposition of tax elasticity shows that tax to base elasticity is weak, suggesting that local governments need to improve discreationary tax changes at local level, such as local base changes, collection changes, and enforcement changes. The analysis also shows that some local tax bases are not responsive to the economic growth, which leads to the recommendation to improve local business environment, such as streamlining local regulations and reducing harmfull local taxes and user charges.Keywords: local finance, local government owned revenue, fiscal decentralization, local tax elasticity, local tax base, nuisance local taxes, local economic growth
THE POLITICS OF BANK SUPERVISION Sukarman, Widigdo
Journal of Indonesian Economy and Business Vol 26, No 1 (2011): January
Publisher : Journal of Indonesian Economy and Business

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Abstract

The bank supervision function and efficacy of monetary policy are often a trade-off for the central bank. An increasingly integrated financial system and the occurrence of bank crises during the 1980s raised the question: are central banks efficient in overseeing banks and is there a requirement for integrated supervision, either under the central bank or separate? The debate among academics and policymakers has never been settled without the guarantee that one alternative will ensure optimal bank supervision. This development has led to periodic changes in the form of supervision chosen. As the basic economic choice has been unsatisfactory, this study approaches the problem using path-dependence theory, which observes historical factors of bank development as well as the constellation of domestic politics in choosing these alternatives.Keywords: path-dependence, bank supervision, politics, country-specific

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