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Wuri Handayani, Ph.D.
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Faculty of Economics and Business, Universitas Gadjah Mada Jalan Sosio Humaniora No. 1, Yogyakarta 55281
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INDONESIA
Journal of Indonesian Economy and Business
ISSN : 20858272     EISSN : 23385847     DOI : -
Core Subject : Economy,
Journal of Indonesian Economy and Business (JIEB) is open access, peer-reviewed journal whose objectives is to publish original research papers related to the Indonesian economy and business issues. This journal is also dedicated to disseminating the published articles freely for international academicians, researchers, practitioners, regulators, and public societies. The journal welcomes author from any institutional backgrounds and accepts rigorous empirical or theoretical research paper with any methods or approach that is relevant to the Indonesian economy and business content, as long as the research fits one of three salient disciplines: economics, business, or accounting.
Articles 6 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 29, No 1 (2014): January" : 6 Documents clear
ACCOUNTABILITY AND PERFORMANCE: EVIDENCE FROM LOCAL GOVERNMENT Nisriani Manafe, Mesri Welhelmina; Akbar, Rusdi
Journal of Indonesian Economy and Business Vol 29, No 1 (2014): January
Publisher : Journal of Indonesian Economy and Business

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Abstract

 Local government accountability attracts attention since the issuance of the PresidentialInstruction Number 7 of 1999 on Accountability Reporting of the Performance of GovernmentInstitutions (Instruksi Presiden No. 7 Tahun 1999 tentang Laporan Kinerja Instansi Pemerintah).In practice, this accountability is not as was expected. One indication of the causalfactor of the failure of the accountability implementation program is that it is considered as anobligation to describe and to justify the behavior of the accountability actors. The objective ofthis study is to empirically examine the correlation between the requirements of various types ofaccountability with negative perception of the work context and the work performance of theaccountability actors. It contributes to the empirical evidence for the correlation among thevarious types of accountability obligation and the work performance based on the institutionaltheory with mixed method, which is a quantitative approach with PLS and a qualitativeapproach with thematic analysis. Its samples are 201 SKPD officers in the local government ofNusa Tenggara TimurProvince. The results of the study show that the conflict in theaccountability requirement has significant impact on the work context with negative perceptionat different levels, but does not have any significant impact on the work performance of theaccountability actors.Keywords: accountability, accountability requirements, work performance, and mixed method.
CAN PRODUCT LEADERSHIP BE A PREDICTOR OF A CUSTOMER’S LOYALTY? Santosa, MS. Eric
Journal of Indonesian Economy and Business Vol 29, No 1 (2014): January
Publisher : Journal of Indonesian Economy and Business

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Abstract

Leading companies commonly employ a particular strategy to cover a market. They mightchoose product leadership, service support excellence, customer intimacy strategy, as well as acombination of them.The use of these strategies is obviously to gain more customers, since the product becomes achoice as an effect of the brand equity strengthening. While firms are very concerned withcustomer loyalty to maintain a stable sales volume, a question arises whether the brand equityhas an effect on the customer’s loyalty. Logically, if a strategy can develop the product’s brandequity which in turn propels cutomers to buy it, it will hopefully improve customers’ loyalty aswell.Therefore, this study is designed to answer the questions, (1) which strategy (among thethree) adds power to the brand equity, (2) the brand equity is influential to the customer’sloyalty, and (3) the product leadership can predict the customer’s loyalty. Three antecedents ofbrand equity are employed, i.e. product leadership, service support excellence, and customerintimacy. These three variables, along with brand equity can also indicate as predictors ofcustomer’s loyalty. A sample consisting of 100 respondents withdrawn through a judgmentmethod. Data were analyzed by Amos 5.0 and SPSS 16.0. The results denote that the relationshipsbetween product leadership and customer intimacy to brand equity, also brand equity tocustomer’s loyalty are significant. On the contrary, the relationship of service supportexcellence to brand equity and the relationship of product leadership to customer’s loyalty aretrivial.Keywords: product leadership, service support excellence, customer intimacy, brand equity,customer’s loyalty
INFLUENCE OF WORK-FAMILY CONFLICT AND FAMILY-WORK CONFLICT ON EMPLOYEES’ TURNOVER INTENTIONS WITH GENDER, SOCIAL SUPPORT AND INDIVIDUAL VALUE AS MODERATING EFFECTS Yunita, Putu Irma; Kismono, Gugup
Journal of Indonesian Economy and Business Vol 29, No 1 (2014): January
Publisher : Journal of Indonesian Economy and Business

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Abstract

work interfering with family-WIF and family interfering with work-FIW) and its influences onturnover intention. This research also examined the moderating effect of gender, social supportand individual values on the relationship between the work-family conflict and turnoverintentions. The participants of this study were 210 low and middle managers of four and fivestar hotels in Bali. This sample consisted of 126 males and 84 females. Multiple regression andhierarchical methods were used to test the proposed hypotheses. The result showed that WIFpositively and significantly influences the turnover intention but FIW did not. It was also foundthat social support significantly moderates the relationships between variables studied, butgender and individual value had no impact on it.Keywords: turnover intention, work interfering with family, family interfering with work,gender, social support, individual value.
PREDICTING INTENDED UNETHICAL BEHAVIOUR AMONG COLLEGE OF ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS STUDENTS: AN EMPIRICAL STUDY AT UNIVERSITAS GADJAH MADA Winahjoe, Sari; Sudiyanti, Sudiyanti
Journal of Indonesian Economy and Business Vol 29, No 1 (2014): January
Publisher : Journal of Indonesian Economy and Business

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Abstract

This study attempted to examine the intention to act in an unethical manner among theeconomics and business students in Universitas Gadjah Mada by applying the Theory ofPlanned Behaviour. Attitude, subjective norms, perceived personal outcome, perceived socialacceptance, and perceived behavioural control were included in predicting this intention. Atotal of 208 students participated in the main investigation. Using ordinal regression, 3hypothetical unethical situations were proposed to measure the students’ intended behaviour:(1) having the class attendance list signed by a classmate; (2) cheating in an examination orquiz; and (3) knowingly plagiarising someone else’s work. The results confirmed that attitudewas the strongest predictor of a student’s intention to act in an unethical manner. The studyfindings also supported subjective norms as the second strongest predictor, which was followedby perceived personal outcome and perceived social acceptance as determinants of suchbehavioural intention. Meanwhile, the findings demonstrated that perceived behavioural controlwas the weakest predictor of intention. Analysis for each situation, implications forpractitioners, specifically university teachers and education policy makers, and further researchrecommendations are also discussed.Keywords: theory of planned behaviour, course of ethics, education policy, behaviouralintention
EARNINGS ANNOUNCEMENTS AND COMPETING INFORMATION: THE INDONESIAN EVIDENCE Sulistiawan, Dedhy; Hartono, Jogiyanto; Tandelilin, Eduardus; Supriyadi, Supriyadi
Journal of Indonesian Economy and Business Vol 29, No 1 (2014): January
Publisher : Journal of Indonesian Economy and Business

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Abstract

The main purpose of this study is to provide empirical evidence of the relationship betweeninvestors’ responses to two events, which are, (1) earnings anouncements, and (2) technicalanalysis signals, as competing information. This study is motivated by Francis, et al. (2002),whose study used stock analyst’s recommendations as competing information in the U.S stockmarket. To extend that idea, this study uses technical analysis signals as competing informationin the Indonesian stock market. Using Indonesian data from 2007-2012, this study shows thatthere are price reactions on the day of a technical analysis signal’s release, which is prior toearnings announcements. It means that investors react to the emergence of competinginformation. Reactions on earnings announcements also produce a negative relationship withthe reaction to a technical analysis signal before an earnings announcement. This study givesevidence about the importance of technical analysis as competing information to earningsannouncements.Keywords: competing information, earnings announcements, technical analysis, price reaction
GREASE OR SAND THE WHEEL? THE EFFECT OF INDIVIDUAL BRIBES ON THE DRIVERS OF AGGREGATE PRODUCTIVITY GROWTH Hanoteau, Julien; Vial, Virginie
Journal of Indonesian Economy and Business Vol 29, No 1 (2014): January
Publisher : Journal of Indonesian Economy and Business

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Abstract

The Asian paradox suggests a net grease-the-wheel effect of corruption. Under the assump-tion of diminishing returns to bribes, going beyond the single-representative-firm assumption,we argue that the grease and sand-the-wheel effects are likely to co-exist among a large numberof firms, and that the industrial effect of corruption depends on the productivity drivers that fuelfirm’s dynamics. We decompose Indonesian manufacturing labor productivity growth whilecontrasting and comparing the contributions of no-, low- and high-bribing firms over the period1975-94. We confirm the coexistence of grease and sand-the-wheel effects. Industrial produc-tivity gains stem first from the net entry of non-corrupted firms, evidencing a sand-the-wheeleffect. Market share reallocation from low to high productivity growth incumbents paying lowbribes is the second source of productivity growth, pointing at a grease-the-wheel effect. Intra-plant productivity growth is overall negative and largely attributable to high-corruption plants,suggesting a sand-the-wheel effect.Keywords: corruption, bribery, productivity

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