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International Journal on Livable Space
Published by Universitas Trisakti
ISSN : 25807552     EISSN : 25407515     DOI : -
Core Subject : Education,
International Journal on Livable Space is focused on the three main aspects of livable space: community life, environment and technology. It is interested at inhabitation process, spatial structures (of houses, housings, neighborhoods, settlements, cities/urban, and territories), with its essential factors (social, cultural, economic, politics, and ideology), including reviews of phenomena in the context of philosophy. It is also interested at spatial context in relation to the aspects of safety, climatic change, social-cultural connectivity, quality of architecture, public facilities, spatial tolerance, environmental issues, ecological access, and the concepts and praxis of community based development.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 82 Documents
BALINESE PLANNING PHILOSOPHY: IMPLEMENTATION IN DENPASAR CITY PLAN Wijaya, K.A.P.; Wiranegara, Hanny Wahidin
International Journal on Livable Space Vol 5, No 1 (2020): QUALITY OF PLACE AND SPACE
Publisher : Trijurnal, Research Institution, Trisakti University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.25105/livas.v5i1.6352

Abstract

ABSTRACT Tri Hita Karana, Tri Mandala, and Sanga Mandala are the Balinese spatial planning philosophies. Core values in Tri Hita Karana are balanced and harmony among parahyangan, palemahan, and pawongan. Denpasar city plan was stated formally based on Tri Hita Karana. Application of this concept was revealed into Tri Mandala and Sanga Mandala which producing nine zones. If these philosophy implemented fully then the land allotment in the spatial plan follow the rules and there is no problem of disharmony between the elements of Tri Hita Karana. The purpose of this study is to identify deviations in the application of traditional Balinese spatial concepts in the Denpasar city plan and proposed prevention of the emergence of problems in its implementation. To find deviations between the Tri Hita Karana concept and the city spatial plan, an overlapping analysis was conducted between the Sanga Mandala zoning and the Denpasar city spatial plan. The results show that there have been deviations in various zones. To prevent the emergence of problems due to deviations, implementation needs to be supported by zoning regulations and other supporting regulations. Keywords: tri hita karana, city spatial plan
THE ACOUSTIC QUALITY OF SEKOLAH ALAM CLASSROOM (CASE: SEKOLAH ALAM IN BANDUNG) widyarko, widyarko
International Journal on Livable Space Vol 5, No 1 (2020): QUALITY OF PLACE AND SPACE
Publisher : Trijurnal, Research Institution, Trisakti University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.25105/livas.v5i1.5970

Abstract

ABSTRACT Sekolah Alam (The Nature School) is a new concept of school in Indonesia that divide its learning process, both indoor and outdoor. As it needs more outdoor space for learning activity, this type of school has larger yards yet smaller classroom compared to conventional school. As it is still new, no previous study has been done to understand the relation between space dimensions, building material, and surroundings to this school classroom acoustic quality. Therefore, this journal studied acoustic quality by calculating Reverberation Time (RT60) and measuring Background noise value of one typical class of Sekolah Alam in Bandung. Reverberation Time (RT60) was calculated using space dimensions and materials that exist within the studied classroom, while the background noise value was measured using Data Logging Sound Level Meter (SLM). The results indicate that the studied class has an ideal acoustic quality for learning activity. The main factors that affected these results are the classroom has a small size in volume and surrounded by lush trees which work as noise controls. Keywords: Reverberation Time; Background Noise; Sekolah Alam; Nature School; Classroom; Elementary School
COGNITIVE RESPONSE ON FAVORITE PLACE CASE STUDY OF INDONESIAN YOUNG ADULTS Lissimia, Finta
International Journal on Livable Space Vol 5, No 1 (2020): QUALITY OF PLACE AND SPACE
Publisher : Trijurnal, Research Institution, Trisakti University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.25105/livas.v5i1.6147

Abstract

ABSTRACT Environmental behavior studies discuss the relationship between environment and the behavior of its users, namely humans. The human response to the physical character of the environment is divided into invisible and visible aspects. Cognitive aspects are invisible response that rarely got attention. Meanwhile, place preference study may result in desirable physical setting. The embodiment of place preferences is a favorite place. Favorite place is a place with higher preference for each person. This article will discuss cognitive responses on favorite place so the result can complement the knowledge about response-based design. Finding cognitive response on favorite place can be achieved using quantitative methods. The data then analyzed using distribution, analysis of variance (ANOVA) and factor analysis. The respondents are Indonesian young adults aged 18-40 years old. The most favorite place of this age group are culinary place, urban commercial, and marine tourism objects. Meanwhile cognitive response that arise on favorite place are hospitality and togetherness. There are five latent variables of cognitive that is environmental experience, social affordance, ecological quality, personal interests, and urban quality Keywords: cognitive response; environmental behavior; favorite place
PLACEMAKING IN TANAH ABANG: BETWEEN DIMENSIONS AND INTENSITY OF PEDESTRIAN WAYS Sukasta, Kariza Ayu Gayatri; winandari, maria Immaculata Ririk
International Journal on Livable Space Vol 5, No 1 (2020): QUALITY OF PLACE AND SPACE
Publisher : Trijurnal, Research Institution, Trisakti University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.25105/livas.v5i1.6364

Abstract

ABSTRACT Placemaking in pedestrian ways of a commercial area has its own characteristics, especially between central mode of transportation and shopping center. The area between Tanah Abang Station and ?Blok A? Tanah Abang Market is bustling with variety of activities, especially temporary commercial activities by street vendors and hawkers as a form of placemaking. This paper explores the relationship between road dimensions and pedestrian intensity of placemaking that occurs along the pedestrian ways between the station and Blok A of The Market. The research method used is mixed method of quantitative data processing and qualitative analysis. Variables used include the dimensions of the pedestrian ways and pedestrian intensity on the path. Pedestrian ways? dimensions cover the width and length of the pathway. Pedestrian intensity is measured by the amount, speed, and space of the pedestrian. Case studies include pedestrian ways on four streets, namely the Streets of Jatibaru Raya, Kebon Jati, Jatibaru 2, and Jatibaru 10. The results of the study show that all four streets have similar placemaking although they differ in dimensions and intensity. This shows the relationship between the dimensions of the road with the intensity of the road and it does affect the formation of place/placemaking. The narrower the width of the road and the shorter the length of the road, the higher the intensity of pedestrians, which is an indicator of the formation of placemaking in the pedestrian ways of Tanah Abang. Keywords: pedestrian way dimensions, pedestrian intensity, placemaking
AIR POLLUTION PREDICTION MODELS DUE TO TRAFFIC VOLUME AND GREEN OPEN SPACE AVAILABILITY Yuwono, Bambang Endro; Sari, Mayang
International Journal on Livable Space Vol 5, No 1 (2020): QUALITY OF PLACE AND SPACE
Publisher : Trijurnal, Research Institution, Trisakti University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.25105/livas.v5i1.6497

Abstract

ABSTRACT As the population grows, the development of the city increases, as a result the movement of transportation also increases. The development of the city can also affect a decrease in green open space. Increased vehicle traffic affects the increase in air pollution. Hence, there is very little research that mathematically connects the influence of traffic volume (passenger car units) and green open space with the level of air pollution. Green open space and the level of air pollution are directly measured on the field. Subsequently, the measurement is calculated by using the regression analysis to obtain a model of the relationship between green open space and traffic volume with the level of air pollution. The research was directly conducted at 3 locations, 2 locations in Jakarta (Semanggi and Tanah Kusir) and 1 location in South Tangerang. This model can be applied to predict that air pollution will occur as a result of traffic volume and the availability of green open space. Keyword: Air pollution, prediction, green open space, traffic volume
ROLE OF DAMAGED HERITAGE RAPID ASSESSMENT IN POST-DISASTER RECOVERY PROGRAM Wijayanto, Punto
International Journal on Livable Space Vol 1, No 1 (2016): Production of Sustainable Space
Publisher : Trijurnal, Research Institution, Trisakti University

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Abstract

Indonesia is a country located in the ring of fire. Various kinds of disasters threats parts of Indonesia, including its rich cultural and natural heritage assets. Since the 2004, Tsunami in Aceh, the government gives serious attention to disaster. In 2007, it stipulated the Law 24/2007 on Disaster Management. Its so unfortunate that cultural heritage is not yet part of main concern during disaster programs. In addition, there are only few experiences in the world about how to deal with the condition of heritage affected by disaster.Heritage organizations in Indonesia aim to raise awareness about disaster risks on cultural heritage. They develop system of damage assessment to cultural heritage or Damage Heritage Rapid Assessment (DHRA) at the time of emergencies. Damage assessment was introduced in Yogyakarta, experienced a lot of damage caused by the massive earthquake in 2006. DHRA has been used in Padang (2009), Yogyakarta (2010), Jakarta (2013) and Manado (2014). This paper aims to explain what DHRA is and how DHRA can contribute to post-disaster rehabilitation and reconstruction of heritage district.Keywords: Damage assessment, disaster, heritage 
About Nusantara Architecture: a Matter of Either-or or Both-and toward Place for Better Living in the Humid Tropic Prijotomo, Joseph
International Journal on Livable Space IS LivaS 2012 "Green Smart City-City of the Future"
Publisher : Trijurnal, Research Institution, Trisakti University

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Abstract

‘Space’ and ‘Better living’ are continuing issues and discourse in architecture. It covers as large as philosophical to practical ones. We may find, for instance, issues in space as one of construction of mind in one extreme, and space as one of volume in certain magnitude at its other extreme. In terms of better living we may also find similar extremes. We may also find that since the times of modern era, space is practically considered as volume of certain magnitude, as is exemplified in a number of standards of areas needed for particular activity;while in terms of better living the focus is in comfort that should be provided in particular room. Unfortunately, we –the Indonesians-- hardly aware and realize that they are not only of western sources, but more importantly, of western mindset. Since they are beautifully and neatly concealed under one objectivity of mind and reason, science, most of us know and accept them as the objective and correct standards. The fact that the West (ie. Europe and North America) are region with four seasons climate system has unavoidably underlies the building of those standards and knowledge. Indonesia and other tropical areas of the world is not region in such a four seasons climate system; it is in a two seasons climate system. This two climate seasons is not simply a variant of climate system; it is of ‘the other’ climate system, as will be demonstrated in this paper. Hence, we may consider this paper as talking about space for better living’ from the point of view of climate system.The clock remains ticking, While the ideals of having architecture that serves better living is always at hand, we are confronted with the question whose living: the wealthy few or every single people, the elite or the common and the elite people. To the four season climate system, living with artificial climate is not incorrect; even the attitude of taking aside the climate is understandable. To the two season climate system, living with natural climate is also not incorrect; and the attitude of optimizing the natural climate is understandable. These two climate system is fundamentally different, and it must be a fatal mistake and fundamental incorrectness to deal with one as a variant of the other. The fact that our knowledge in two season climate system is very poor, that does not mean that this system be discarded.The call for architecture for better living is demanding a definite respond: a denial (and ultimately, elimination) of two season climate system, or an equal, yet distinct, both two and four season climate system. The former is quite easy while the latter requires hard work. The former will make architecture in Indonesia serves the wealthy few, while the latter will serves the whole people of Indonesia.
SUSTAINABILITY LESSON FROM SOUTHEAST ASIA: SINGAPORE EXPERIENCE WIDODO, Johannes
International Journal on Livable Space Vol 1, No 1 (2016): Production of Sustainable Space
Publisher : Trijurnal, Research Institution, Trisakti University

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Abstract

To inaugurate the birth of Livable Space e-Journal (LivaS) it is proper to remind ourselves that livability requires holistic approach, strong vision, sustainable practice, and resilience. This keynote article will outline a story of Singapore, a tiny island nation without natural resources, in its continuous struggle for survival from the past to the present and towards the future. It will discuss various examples on different scale levels (city planning, architecture, design ideas, conservation projects, environmental practices, etc.), and focusing onen how our planning and design disciplines can contribute to tangible efforts to achieve environmental, cultural, and economic sustainability in holistic way.
“Clean and Dirty” on Batavia Canal and Colonial Spatial Transformation Dewi, Euis Puspita
International Journal on Livable Space SEMNAS LivaS 2015 "Keberlanjutan Ruang Huni Masa Depan: Eko-Arsitektur"
Publisher : Trijurnal, Research Institution, Trisakti University

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Abstract

The issue of cleanliness is not only related to the physical aspect, but it is also closely related to social and cultural dimensions. The concept of "clean" and "dirty" can be used as a marker of differences of race, class, and color of skin, either in relation to clothing, body, natural environment, or built environment. Batavia canals as artificial environment of the colonial period, now dirty and smelly, is a phenomenon that needs to be revealed by understanding its long history through photographs, paintings, and stories in terms of "clean" and "dirty" as well as all the activities on the canals. That evidence can be traced synchronically and diachronically.In the beginning of the 17th century, Batavia Canal was a wide, clean, and beautiful stream for defensive purposes, recreation, flood control, and status markers, then it transformed into a dirty, smelly, and disgusting canal in the mid 18th century. Finally the Batavia canal was abandoned, and the authority the Europeans was moved the administrative center to a higher area called Weltevreden for hygiene reasons. It resulted on the development of landhuis along the Molenvliet canal, that was ever built in 1648 was revived and used as the access that connects the upper and lower town. In the beginning of the 20th century, the Molenvliet and Pasar Baru canalsin Weltevreden area were no longer used by the European, especially when technology,transportation, and sanitation were developed. At that time, Europeans had to choose whether to live in a more classy and civilized lifestyle. Instead, they prefer to choose horse-drawn carriages and trams as a means of transportation and a bathroom at the backyard as a space for cleanliness. Whereas, the canal is used only by indigenous people to do daily activities, such as bathing, washing, fishing and others. Canal became a marker of stratification status of indigenous and European. The European used a room bounded walls as personal services area, while indigenous people used canal as their sanitation public services.The canal is recognized as a ‘dirty’ area because of the history. Therefore, the public should create the concept of cleanliness deriving from their own cultural identity instead of imitating others.Keywords: Canal, Cleanliness, Dirty, Transformation.
User Oriented Design Process Purnomo, Agus Budi
International Journal on Livable Space IS LivaS 2012 "Green Smart City-City of the Future"
Publisher : Trijurnal, Research Institution, Trisakti University

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Abstract

Architecture can be defined as human creation. Architecture is created by human and for human. However, in the real world, through the history of architecture, human component had receded to the background over shadowed by personal idea of the designers. As a result space designed by architects is often aliened by human being. In other words such space ceased to become livable. In this paper I will discuss about an increasingly used user oriented design process. Such method can re-humanize spaces that are designed by architects and designer at large. The user oriented design process discussed in the paper will include user oriented parametric design, user oriented design process, phenomenological approaches, and participatory design process. In this paper I also discuss the consequences of the user oriented design to the pedagogical aspects in design schools. Therefore, the applications of user oriented design process can also be taught to younger generation and future designers.Keywords: User, stakeholder, parameters, phenomenology, participatory design.