Claim Missing Document
Check
Articles

Found 4 Documents
Search

KARAKTERISTIK PASIEN TUBERKULOSIS TULANG BELAKANG DI RSUD DR. SOETOMO SURABAYA Sukamto, Amy Rosalie; Airlangga, Primadenny Ariesa; Yuliawati, Tri Hartini
Majalah Biomorfologi Vol 29, No 1 (2019): Majalah Biomorfologi
Publisher : Universitas Airlangga

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (280.077 KB) | DOI: 10.20473/mbiom.v29i1.2019.1-6

Abstract

Background: Spine tuberculosis or spondylitis TB is one of the most common found extrapulmonary form of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection that can be rapidly transmitted. However, people’s alertness are still to be increased and this disease is still rarely investigated. Objective: To study the characteristics of spondylitis tuberculosis patients to enhance the understanding of the disease and improve alertness to its signs and symptoms. Material and method: This study was conducted by assessing patients’ medical records based on particularly the epidemiology, signs and symptoms, radiology and laboratory tests. Collected data were assessed retrospectively and analyzed descriptively. Results: Of 35 patients, most come from early adult age group which is ranged from 26 to 35 years old (25.72%), and 57.14% of the patients were female. Sorted from the most to least common found signs and symptoms are back pain (85.71%), formation of abscess (74.29%), formation of gibbus (54.29%), fever (37.14%), and significant weight loss (34.29%). In radiologic evaluation, spine destruction were found on 82.86% of the patients. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) was evaluated from 30 patients, 90% of which had increased ESR to >30 mm/hour. The leukocyte count was based from 35 patients, which result was 71.43% of them had normal count. Conclusions: Spondylitis TB is mostly found in adult females with back pain as the most common symptom. Most patients had spine destruction. Largely had elevated ESR while their leukocyte count mostly remains within normal range.
UNSTABLE LUMBAR FRACTURE-DISLOCATION TREATED BY LONG SEGMENT POSTERIOR PEDICLE SCREW INSTRUMENTATION Danang, Ferdiansyah; Airlangga, Primadenny Ariesa
JOINTS (Journal Orthopaedi and Traumatology Surabaya) Vol 9, No 2 (2020): October 2020
Publisher : Universitas Airlangga

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.20473/joints.v9i2.2020.71-76

Abstract

Background: Among all the thoracolumbar fractures, 50-60% affects the thoracolumbar transitional zone, and 51% AO Type C Fractures has a neurological deficit. We experienced treating a case of unstable lumbar fracture-dislocation treated with long segment pedicle screw instrumentation.Case Report: A 26-year-old man came to the ER after his back hit by a canopy while working 2 hours before admission. The motoric function was diminished from the L2-S1 level and hypoesthesia at the T12 level. Plain X-Ray showed Fracture-Dislocation Lumbar Vertebral 1-2 Denis Classification Flexion Rotation (AO Type C) ASIA A. The patient underwent reduction, decompression, and long-segment posterior pedicle screw instrumentation.Discussion: The surgery’s primary purpose is to restore alignment and stability to improve the patient’s quality of life by enabling daily activity in a wheelchair without significant pain. Short segment or long segment pedicle screw instrumentation remains a debate. In this case report, we apply long segment pedicle screw instrumentation for lumbar vertebral fracture-dislocation.Conclusion: Thoracolumbar fracture and dislocation fixation aim to restore alignment and stability, to reduce kyphotic deformity, and to decompress the spinal canal. The long segment pedicle screw instrumentation can resist the deforming force of thoracolumbar fractures and dislocations that will inevitably collapse into further kyphosis, resulting in a better outcome.
THORACIC SPINE CANAL STENOSIS WITH CAUDA EQUINE SYNDROME: CASE REPORT Airlangga, Primadenny Ariesa; Arifin, Arifin
JOINTS (Journal Orthopaedi and Traumatology Surabaya) Vol 8, No 2 (2019): October 2019
Publisher : Universitas Airlangga

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.20473/joints.v8i2.2019.86-92

Abstract

Background: Cases of thoracic stenosis with cauda equina syndrome are rare. The thoracal canal is relatively narrow compared with cervical and lumbar, so the less pressure on the lower thoracal region is the thoracic vertebral height 11 which is the initial release of the cauda equine nerve root can cause complaints of cauda equina syndrome.Case: A 50-year-old male presented pain in both legs for 3 years, accompanied by weakness in the legs, numbness in the buttocks, and erectile dysfunction. Thoracal MRI examination shows severe spinal stenosis at 11th-12th thoracal vertebra with ligamentum flavum hypertrophy. Second patient, a 70-year-old man complained of weak legs since 1 week, accompanied by low back pain, numbness in the buttocks, and difficulty defecating. Thoracal MRI examination shows severe spinal stenosis in the 10th-11th thoracal vertebra. Both patients immediately underwent selective decompression surgery, laminotomy, and flavectomy at thoracal level showed satisfactory results based on improvement in clinical symptoms.Discussion: Leg weakness, hypoesthesia in the buttocks and pubic area, erectile dysfunction is the cauda equina syndrome. The exit of the first cauda equine nerve can be placed at 11th thoracic vertebra, so the presence of stenosis at that level and bellow can cause symptoms of the cauda equina syndrome. MRI examination is needed to ensure that there is severe spinal stenosis at the level of the thoracal-lumbar spine, according to the level of neurological disorders. The surgery of decompression is immediately carried out in the case of cauda equina syndrome because it is an emergency state.Conclusion. In cases with complaints of the cauda equina syndrome, thoracic stenosis can be the cause due to stenosis of the lower thoracic region which is the initial root of the cauda equina nerve. Confirm accurate diagnosis is with MRI.
Collagen Type I and Type II Expression Evaluation on Cartilage Defect Regeneration Treated with Dwikora–Ferdiansyah–Lesmono–Purwati (DFLP) Scaffold Supplemented with Adipose–Derived Stem Cells (ASCs) or Secretome: An In-Vivo Study Perbowo, Adrianto Prasetyo; Utomo, Dwikora Novembri; Widhiyanto, Lukas; Airlangga, Primadenny Ariesa; Purwati, Purwati
Qanun Medika - Jurnal Kedokteran FK UMSurabaya Vol 4, No 2 (2020)
Publisher : Universitas Muhammadiyah Surabaya

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.30651/jqm.v4i2.4377

Abstract

Abstract Cell-based therapies such as Scaffold, stem cells, and secretome, are one of the alternatives to enhance the regeneration of hyaline-like cartilage in cases of cartilage defects. This study is an in-vivo experiment using animal models, in which we apply a composite of DFLP (Dwikora-Ferdiansyah-Lesmono-Purwati) Scaffold and Adipose-Derived Stem Cells (ASCs) or Secretome to an injury model on the distal femoral trochlea of New Zealand White Rabbits. The animals were divided into four groups: (1) control (K); (2) Scaffold only (S); (3) Scaffold + ASCs (SA); (4) Scaffold + Secretome (SS). Animals were terminated in the 12th week, and an immunohistochemistry (IHC) evaluation for Collagen type I and II were done. Statistical analysis shows that collagen type I IHC between groups shows no significant difference (p = 0.546). Collagen type II IHC shows significant difference between groups (p = 0,016). The findings in this study showed that Scaffold + ASCs group and Scaffold + Secretome have better collagen type II expression compared to the control group. DFLP Scaffold composite with ASCs or Secretome shows potential for cartilage regeneration therapy by increasing type II collagen expression as in hyaline-like cartilage which may be used for regenerative therapy for cartilage defects. Keywords             : DFLP Scaffold; Adipose-Derived Stem Cells (ASCs); Secretome; Collagen Type I; Collagen Type IICorrespondence    : ianperbowo@me.com