Evynurul Laily Zen
Fakultas Sastra Universitas Negeri Malang Alamat Korepondensi: Jalan Semarang 5 Malang

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AFIKS TIDAK BAKU DALAM BAHASA INDONESIA RAGAM INFORMAL Zen, Evynurul Laily
LiNGUA: Jurnal Ilmu Bahasa dan Sastra Vol 6, No 1 (2011): LiNGUA
Publisher : Laboratorium Informasi & Publikasi Fakultas Humaniora UIN Maulana Malik Ibrahim Malang

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.18860/ling.v6i1.1300

Abstract

This paper discusses the form and meaning of conjunctive relation and how conjunctive relation is translated from source language into target language. The different system of amongst languages  in forming words, sentences or paragraph might  represent  peculiar form and meaning. As a part of element in determining logical meaning, conjunctive relation can be in the  form of conjunction, verb, noun, preposition and implicit. Those forms signal how unity of a text constructed. In translation, the use of conjunctive relation forms frequently make problem for translators since it  is closely related to logical meaning in a text.  In translating text, different meaning between two  languages should be occasionally translated into different form and meaning of the two languages. To understand a text comprehensively, a reader must know the unity of a text. One of the aspects to determine unity of a text in translation is conjunctive relation. The unity of a text can be covered with the conjunctive relation which signal logical relation among clauses, sentences and paragraph, so that in translation cohesiveness of a text is interpreted well both in source text and target text.
IMPROVING THE TEACHING AND LEARNING QUALITY BY DEVELOPING AUN-QA BASED COURSE OUTLINES Suharmanto,, Suharmanto,; Hidayati, Maria; Zen, Evynurul Laily
Bahasa dan Seni: Jurnal Bahasa, Sastra, Seni, dan Pengajarannya Vol 41, No 2 (2013)
Publisher : Fakultas Sastra Universitas Negeri Malang

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (138.31 KB)

Abstract

The primary purpose of this article is to provide detailed process in develop- ing AUN-QA based course outlines as a way to improve the quality of teaching and learning. AUN-QA which stands for ASEAN University Network Quality Assurance is selected due to its recognition of raising academic standards and enhancing education, research and service among AUN university members (AUN-QA guideline, 2010). It is a research and development study which is conducted through the following stages: (1) research and information collecting from AUN-QA guideline, the teaching and learning present condition of English Department, State University of Malang and the course outline models; (2) planning the arrangement of questionnaire items and its distribution to students; (3) developing AUN-QA course outlines; (4) validating the products by AUN- QA and curriculum experts; and (5) trying out the products to the students. 
A CLOSE LOOK AT BILINGUALISM RESEARCH IN ASIA Zen, Evynurul Laily
Indonesian Journal of Applied Linguistics Vol 7, No 2 (2017): Vol. 7 No. 2, September 2017
Publisher : Universitas Pendidikan Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.17509/ijal.v7i2.8133

Abstract

Asia is a ‘homeland’ for bilingualism research in regards to its diversity. It is considered as a vivid research site where there is significant growth of academic areas of exploration. Yet, there are very few scientific attempts to map bilingualism research in an Asian context so far. Thus, I bring the idea of mapping previous works through this literature study by specifically scrutinizing (a) bilingualism research in Southeast Asia, (b) bilingualism research in other parts of Asia, and (c) lessons to learn as a stepping stone to define the future of Indonesian bilingualism. The general data mapping I have explored includes Southeast Asian countries (Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, Thailand, and Vietnam) and other parts of Asia (China, India, Israel, and Kazakhstan. The findings from the 33 previous works can be considered as empirical evidence that I will use to portray the research trends in Asia’s bilingualism. The trends show that 19 (55%) works have approached bilingual data from sociolinguistics perspective, whereas the other 14 (45%) have framed their analysis under psycholinguistic approach. Based on the methodological concerns from these works, I propose two major areas of exploration: Family Language Policy (FLP) and trilingual acquisition. FLP in Indonesian is a promising ground, as it brings together issues in language maintenance and shift that instigate a wider aspect of investigation; these aspects include bilingual language dominance, cross language influence, and so forth. Trilingual acquisition, the situation most Indonesian children are growing with, has a potentially significant impact on education, especially where a language curriculum is carefully planned and implemented. In conclusion, this mapping will hopefully shed a light on how bilingualism has academically been very appealing and will continue to fascinate more researchers.
On the Acquisition of English Voiceless Stop VOT by Indonesian-English Bilinguals: Evidence of Input Frequency Zen, Evynurul Laily
k@ta Vol 20 No 2 (2018): DECEMBER 2018
Publisher : Institute of Research and Community Outreach - Petra Christian University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (21.805 KB) | DOI: 10.9744/kata.20.2.45-52

Abstract

The paper attempted to investigate the acquisition of Voice Onset Time (VOT) of voiceless stop consonants of English /p/, /t/, and /k/ by Indonesian-English bilingual children in its close relation to how second language (L2) input shapes the L2 VOT production. It looked at two types of bilingual participants; (1) one 6-year-old participant receiving extensive input of English natives from YouTube in about 8 hours per day since she was two in addition to having an interactive communication in English with her family members (2) four students (aged 7-8 years old) of International Class Program with non-native environment of English. Both groups were residing in Malang, East Java, Indonesia at the time of data collection. The comparative analysis concluded that the VOT valued differ significantly across different inputs. The participants with non native input acquired much shorter VOTs falling within the average of 28 – 36 ms, while the one with native input could achieve native-like VOTs in the average of 69 ms for /p/ and /t/ and even longer for stop consonant /k/. Contributing factors of individual differences might arrive from input frequency levels, types of inputs, and complexities of phonological properties of Indonesian and English.
On the Acquisition of English Voiceless Stop VOT by Indonesian-English Bilinguals: Evidence of Input Frequency Zen, Evynurul Laily
k@ta Vol 20 No 2 (2018): DECEMBER 2018
Publisher : Institute of Research and Community Outreach - Petra Christian University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (676.049 KB) | DOI: 10.9744/kata.20.2.45-52

Abstract

The paper attempts to investigate the acquisition of Voice Onset Time (VOT) of voiceless stop consonants of English /p/, /t/, and /k/ by Indonesian-English bilingual children in its close relation to how second language (L2) input shapes the L2 VOT production. It looks at two different groups of children with native and non native input environment; (1) one 6-years-old girl receiving extensive exposures of English natives from YouTube in about 8 hours per day since she was two in addition to having interactive communication in English with her family members (2) four students (aged 7-8 years old) enrolling in English Partial Immersion Program with non-native environment of English. The comparative analysis concludes that the VOT values differ significantly across different inputs. The children with non native input acquired much shorter VOTs falling within the average of 28 – 36 ms, while those with native input could achieve native-like VOTs in the average of 69 ms for /p/ and /t/ and even longer for stop consonant /k/.
A CORPUS-BASED ANALYSIS ON MULTILINGUAL CHILDREN'S NARRATIVES IN INDONESIAN CONTEXTS Laily Zen, Evynurul
LiNGUA: Jurnal Ilmu Bahasa dan Sastra Vol 15, No 1 (2020): LiNGUA
Publisher : Laboratorium Informasi & Publikasi Fakultas Humaniora UIN Maulana Malik Ibrahim Malang

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (588.283 KB) | DOI: 10.18860/ling.v15i1.7731

Abstract

Children’s narratives have served as an effective diagnostic tool for teachers and researchers to engage to a variety of language acquisition and development aspects. Previous works have extensively assessed this type of language production along two dimensions; story memory and story quality in which the first concerns on children’s ability to accurately reproduce units of information within the story, while the second emphasizes their understanding of story structures. Our analysis focuses on the second where we carefully look at two categories; orientations (person, time, place, connectors, etc) and evaluation (personal judgment). Our data were based in part on a limited corpus of multilingual written production of 261 third graders in 6 primary schools in east java, Indonesia. This dataset contained the production of both personal narratives in which our participants had to write their personally experienced event of school holiday and fictional narratives where they had to rewrite a short video story of a perfect father’s day. To generate the targeted expressions from our relatively large datasets, we utilized a corpus tool of AntConc. Our analysis has echoed several findings. In terms of ‘person’ orientation, our participants were consistent in orienting their personal narratives with ‘I’ and their fictional narratives with ‘dad/father’. The emergence of the word ‘home’ in the first place was particularly interesting as a key to explain ‘place’ orientation that it translates a place to start and end the activities in children’s point of view. The word ‘after’ and ‘then’ to connect events were heavily found in our data that it illustrates the pedagogical need to enrich their lexical knowledge. Finally, at the expense of being multilingual, evidence of code-mixing was also apparent in our participants’ English narratives that this may posit pedagogical implication too.