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k@ta
ISSN : 14112639     EISSN : 23026294     DOI : -
Core Subject : Education,
k@ta: a biannual publication on the study of language and literature is a refereed journal published twice a year in June and December by the English Department, Faculty of Letters, Petra Christian University, Surabaya, Indonesia. It presents articles on the study of language, literature and culture.
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Articles 6 Documents
Search results for , issue "Vol 21 No 1 (2019): JUNE 2019" : 6 Documents clear
The Nature of Revolution on Animal Farm Mustafa, Goran Omar
k@ta Vol 21 No 1 (2019): JUNE 2019
Publisher : The English Department, Faculty of Languages and Literature, Petra Christian University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.9744/kata.21.1.17-23

Abstract

ABSTRACT Revolution as a phenomenon is considered as a way to a complete change of a situation or system of government to a better one. Dose revolution really is the right way to fulfil our dreams and have a better way of life? Or simply it is just changing the face of rulers or the name of the governments. Many writers and novelists wrote about this issue. George Orwell which is considered as apolitical writer, is one of them. He wrote many novels. Animal Farm, as one of them, is an allegorical story of some animals in a farm. They begin a revolution against the humans with the dream of getting rid of Man as the root cause of their problems, and to be rich and free. They have a short period of honeymoon revolution, but then their dream of building a utopian farm crashes by the pigs and would find themselves in dystopia. This paper aims to study the nature of revolution generally in the shed light of human history. Then to explore how this phenomenon is treated by Orwell in his novel. Can we consider revolution as a right way to have a complete change in the political system and thinking of people? The researchers try to illuminate and find answer for those questions by providing examples from the story of Animal Farm.
Susan Glaspell’s “Trifles” in the Light of Ecofeminism Bazregarzadeh, Elmira
k@ta Vol 21 No 1 (2019): JUNE 2019
Publisher : The English Department, Faculty of Languages and Literature, Petra Christian University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.9744/kata.21.1.10-16

Abstract

Throughout historical decades the unfair system of life in patriarchal societies and the oppression of women by men have always been key concepts in the literature of the world that have given rise to hot topics of discussion among different nations, questioning the real motive behind such trends. Hence, by examining Susan Glaspell’s “Trifles” through the lens of Ecofeminism the present paper aims to show how it can be considered as an ecofeminist work of literature doing away with the notions that pertain to the oppression of women and Nature by men.
The Politics of Religion in Sisworo Gautama Putra’s and Joko Anwar’s Pengabdi Setan Sutandio, Anton
k@ta Vol 21 No 1 (2019): JUNE 2019
Publisher : The English Department, Faculty of Languages and Literature, Petra Christian University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.9744/kata.21.1.24-32

Abstract

This research compares two films, the original Pengabdi Setan and its remake, in the context of politics of religion to show how the two films depict the issue of religion at two different eras based on the released years of the two films. The display of religion in the two films is viewed as an allegorical representation as well as critical responses to the socio-political situation of the two eras. Separated by almost four decades, Joko Anwar’s nostalgic remake and the original film subtly converse with each other, share distinctive similarities yet also polarized differences that underlie their endeavor to allegorically bring back and relive public memory of certain national trauma; that is repression during the New Order regime and marginalization of the minority in contemporary Indonesia. By focusing on the films’ cinematography and mise-en-scene, this research attempts to locate those allegorical moments within the depiction of religious practice that challenge, criticize or accentuate the dominant ideology of their respective eras. Keywords: allegorical moment, religion, national trauma, politicization
Chinese as a Cultural Capital: The Case Study of Chinese Heritage Language Learners Kurniawan, Budi; Suprajitno, Setefanus
k@ta Vol 21 No 1 (2019): JUNE 2019
Publisher : The English Department, Faculty of Languages and Literature, Petra Christian University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.9744/kata.21.1.1-9

Abstract

Chinese language education in Indonesia is closely related to the social, political, and cultural dimensions of the country. The change of power in the country in 1998 affected the development of Chinese language. Since the ban imposed on Chinese language and culture since 1965 was lifted, there have been an increasing number of Chinese language schools. Under the theoretical frameworks of Gardner’s motivational orientations and Bourdieu’s cultural capital, this study explored varied motivations of Chinese Indonesians to learn Chinese, and how their perception of China influenced their efforts in learning the language. Data were obtained through focus group discussions and interviews. The findings showed that integrative and instrumental orientations were found among participants, but due to the learners’ social milieu, instrumentality of Chinese dominated their orientations. The instrumentality of Chinese and the positive perception of China worked together to make Chinese language as a cultural capital for these CHL learners.
Tiger mother and her cubs on a stage: Irawan, Stefanny
k@ta Vol 21 No 1 (2019): JUNE 2019
Publisher : The English Department, Faculty of Languages and Literature, Petra Christian University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.9744/kata.21.1.33-41

Abstract

Ever since the publication of Amy Chua’s memoir, Battle Hymn of The Tiger Mother, in 2011, Asian or Asian-heritage parenting has received more time under the limelight both in and out of the United States. More attention is given to the effects of that particular parenting style on the children’s academic achievement and wellbeing. Listen to Me (LTM), a play by Bernadeth Febyola Linando (2018) published as one of Petra Little Theatre’s New Play Development Series, indicates that the issue also hits a nerve among young contemporary Indonesian playwrights. This paper is interested in finding out how LTM portrays Tiger Mother parenting style and its impact on the children. Upon analyzing the play using the conceptual framework of parenting styles and their impacts, this paper argues that LTM displays a typical Tiger Mother parenting similar to Chua’s with a slight difference, and it shows mainly negative results of such parenting on the main character, and, on the side, some positive results on two other supporting characters.
The Survival of Faith in Solzhenitsyn’s One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich and “Matryona’s House” Yulianto, Wawan Eko
k@ta Vol 21 No 1 (2019): JUNE 2019
Publisher : The English Department, Faculty of Languages and Literature, Petra Christian University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (334.093 KB) | DOI: 10.9744/kata.21.1.42-50

Abstract

Faith is a vital element in the works of Nobel laureate Alexander Solzhenitsyn, a Russian writer who experienced the notorious Gulag and difficultly in a strongly atheistic country. However, faith is never a simplistic topic for Solzhenitsyn, especially writing in a time when religion was officially shoved aside from the public discourse. In the light of a set of views on religion inferred from Terry Eagleton’s essay, this paper aims to explain the anomalous religiosity as seen in the narrators of Solzhenitsyn’s novel One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich and short story “Matryona’s House.” According to the Eagleton’s model, there are three stages of religiosity, namely, 1) omission of religion’s otherworldly and pure ritualistic elements, 2) acceptance of mentally-empowering potentials of religion, and 3) internalization of the humanistic values of religion. The analysis concludes with a notion that One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich and “Matryona’s House” represent an evolution of faith that has gone through a period of challenge. On a sidenote, the analysis also confirms the dialogic nature of Solzhenitsyn’s works, in which one topic is presented through contradictory voices.

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