cover
Contact Name
Wahid Yunianto
Contact Email
yunianto_wahid@yahoo.co.id
Phone
+6285643763865
Journal Mail Official
seamej@qitepinmath.org
Editorial Address
SEAMEO Regional Centre for QITEP in Mathematics Jl. Kaliurang Km 6, Sambisari, Condongcatur, Depok, Sleman Yogyakarta, Indonesia
Location
Kab. sleman,
Daerah istimewa yogyakarta
INDONESIA
Southeast Asian Mathematics Education Journal
ISSN : 20894716     EISSN : 27218546     DOI : https://doi.org/10.46517/seamej
Core Subject : Education,
The Journal invites original research articles and not simultaneously submitted to another journal or conference. The whole spectrum of research in mathematics education are welcome, which includes, but is not limited to the following topics: Realistic Mathematics Education Realistic Mathematics Education (RME) is a teaching and learning theory in mathematics education that was first introduced and developed by Freudenthal. There are two important points in RME; mathematics must be connected to reality and mathematics as a human activity. RME is implemented three principles, they are: (1) guided reinvention and progressive mathematizing, (2) didactical phenomenology, and (3) self-developed model. Furthermore, the practice of RME also has its own characteristics, they are: (1) phenomenological exploration or the use of contexts, (2) the use of models or bridging by vertical instruments, (3) the use of students own productions and constructions or students contribution, (4) the interactive character of the teaching process or interactivity, and (5) the intertwining of various learning strands. A paper is eligible to be included in this topic if the paper accommodates these three principles and these five characteristics. Joyful Learning in Mathematics Education The main goal of mathematics education in school is the mathematization of the child’s thought process through joyful learning. Learning should be something joyful because it is a perpetual growth process and self-reflection. Mathematics teachers are expected to develop ideas to motivate students by joyful activities, such as discovering, exploring, constructing, designing, setting strategy, and solving problems that are wrapped in mathematics games, puzzles, and hands-on activities. Integrating ICT in Mathematics Education The advance of information and communication technology (ICT) has been the concern of all human life, including in education. When all students use technology, education must be the first one to utilize it for the sake of effectiveness and attractiveness. The researches (ideas of research) on related topics could be traced to the works of Paul Drijvers, Willem J. Pelgrum, Tjeerd Plomp, Jean-Baptiste Lagrange, Michèle Artigue, Colette Laborde, Luc Trouche, and published books in Springer or other publishers. STEM Education Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) has been major topic of discussion in the field of education, due to the most esteemed fields to respond to the demand of 21st century. STEM education will be an important knowledge for teachers to educate future high-quality workforce. STEM education can be implemented in any level of education. The main principle of STEM education is Engineering Design Process (EDP). This principle consists of cyclic process: (1) Identifying problem, (2) Researching the problem, (3) Developing possible solutions, (4) Selecting promising solution, (5) Building the prototype, (6) Evaluating the prototype, (7) Redesigning. The idea research of STEM Education can be explored in Breiner, Harkness, Johnson, and Koehler; Sanders; and Bybee. Lesson Study Lesson Study is a well-known approach originated from Japan for action research in classroom by teachers. It is an effective model for teachers to join their activities to improve their teaching. This approach emphasizes the improvement of students’ mathematical thinking which involves three steps namely Plan-Do-See. The research (ideas of research) on related topics could be traced to the works of Fernandez and Yoshida, Lewis and Wang-Iverson and Yoshida. Teacher-made Mathematics Teaching Aids Students at times struggle with mathematics due to the abstract concepts involved. To help address this issue teachers can use physical objects, such as teaching aids, to make the concepts more relatable and understandable. It also provides opportunity for students to understand and internalize basic mathematial concepts through concrete objects and situations. A paper is eligible for this topic if it comprehensively explains the mathematics teaching aid made by the teachers and the learning opportunities offered to the students. Clinical Supervision Having strong educational leadership is known to be a major factor in improving student learning. By providing vision and development opportunities, educational leaders can help facilitate the conditions necessary for teachers to perform at their best. A good supervision involves activities that aids, directs and informs teachers of what should be done or have been done and not merely finding faults in the teachers’ teaching. A paper is eligible for inclusion in the clinical supervision if it provides a comprehensive description and analysis of every stage in the supervision process Differentiated Instruction Differentiated instruction is a teaching theory based on the premise that instructional approaches should vary and be adapted in relation to individual and diverse students in classrooms. Many classes consisting of students with diverse learning abilities require a teacher capable of designing teaching strategies that accommodate all learning styles. Therefore, the scope of differentiated instruction is an important part of the focus and scope of the journal. Teacher Professional Development Teacher professional development is defined as activities that develop an teacher’s skills, knowledge, expertise and other characteristics. The definition recognizes that development can be provided in many ways, ranging from the formal to the informal. It can be made available through external expertise in the form of courses, workshops or formal qualification programs, through collaboration between schools or teachers across schools (e.g. observational visits to other schools or teacher networks) or within the schools in which teachers work. In this last case, development can be provided through coaching/mentoring, collaborative planning and teaching, and the sharing of good practices. Classroom Action Research Classroom action research is a reflective process which helps teachers to explore and examine aspects of teaching and learning and to take action to change and improve. It begins with a question or questions about classroom experiences, issues, or challenges. Generally, classroom action research is consisting of 4 steps, namely, planning, action, observation, and reflection. Authors could submit their work, with a comprehensive description and analysis of every step.
Articles 8 Documents
Search results for , issue "Vol 7, No 1 (2017)" : 8 Documents clear
CHANGING THE ATTITUDES AND BELIEFS OF PRE-SERVICE PRIMARY TEACHERS TOWARDS MATHEMATICS Stoilescu, Dorian
Southeast Asian Mathematics Education Journal Vol 7, No 1 (2017)
Publisher : SEAMEO Regional Centre for QITEP in Mathematics

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (207.594 KB) | DOI: 10.46517/seamej.v7i1.42

Abstract

The importance of preparing primary educators capable of successfully teachingmathematics has been extensively emphasized in educational research. However, it is widely acknowledged that pre-service teachers in primary education start their career with poor attitudes and a great degree of anxiety towards mathematics. As such, primary education has been under severe criticism for not being able to provide their pre-service teachers with an adequate set of skills and attitudes towards mathematics. This paper discusses several cases and searches for possible explanations that are perpetuating this state. As well, this theoretical paper gives some recommendations for decreasing mathematics anxiety and improving mathematical knowledge for pre-service teachers in primary education.
INNOVATION IN MATHEMATICS EDUCATION THROUGH LESSON STUDY: CHALLENGES TO STEM ON STATISTICS AND ELECTRICITY SAVING Riyanta, Riyanta; Wulandari, Ika
Southeast Asian Mathematics Education Journal Vol 7, No 1 (2017)
Publisher : SEAMEO Regional Centre for QITEP in Mathematics

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (433.645 KB) | DOI: 10.46517/seamej.v7i1.48

Abstract

This collaborative research aims to provide necessary scientific and practical knowledge on statistics and electricity saving topics through integration of energy efficiency into vocational schools? mathematics curriculum. The paper reports on how the teachers in a lesson study group developed teaching and learning models on statistics integrated with electricity saving. The implementation processes of this learning model started with data collection, continued with data processing, data presentation, and data analysis of the electricity billing payment of the students? houses. Through this learning process, the students were expected to be more aware in saving electricity and using energy wiser. The analyses were done qualitatively using triangulation including combining documents, observations, photographs, and videos.The findings revealed that this learning model sharpened the students? ability around reasoning, processing, presenting and analyzing the data from contextual problems. Students could also define the factors affecting the electricity used, and then identify the ways to save energy. Further, the students created a simple video and poster for a saving electricity campaign at school, home, and social media. While the results are interesting and encouraging and provide some promising directions, they are not a proof and a much larger study would be needed to determine if the results are due to the approach or due to the teachers? enthusiasm, novelty effect or what is known as the Hawthorne Effect.
MATHEMATICS LITERACY: AN AUSTRALIAN PERSPECTIVE AND EXPERIENCE White, Allan Leslie
Southeast Asian Mathematics Education Journal Vol 7, No 1 (2017)
Publisher : SEAMEO Regional Centre for QITEP in Mathematics

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (749.498 KB) | DOI: 10.46517/seamej.v7i1.43

Abstract

A brief listing of five different types of mathematical literacy is provided. The definition used by the Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) is selected and some brief remarks are provided on this program. The performance of Australian students is examined which shows that at the beginning of the new century 2000, Australian educators were feeling comfortable and reasonably satisfied with student performance but by 2016there was great concern over a consistent decline. The reasons for this decline are briefly discussed with the focus on Australian governmental policies that followed the directions of reform in the United States and Great Britain, and what has been labelled GERM. Current policies have been tried and failed and it is time to look for alternatives. While it is not wise to just copy the programs and policies of another country rather than adapt them due to differences in culture, population diversity, and other factors, nevertheless countries such as Finland can offer alternative paths to be explored. In Australia?s case it would also seem to be unwise to adopt policies and programs of countries who perform worse than it.
PROFILING SELF-REGULATED LEARNING IN ONLINE MATHEMATICS TEACHER TRAINING: A CASE STUDY OF A GEOGEBRA COURSE Marfuah, Marfuah
Southeast Asian Mathematics Education Journal Vol 7, No 1 (2017)
Publisher : SEAMEO Regional Centre for QITEP in Mathematics

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (387.55 KB) | DOI: 10.46517/seamej.v7i1.44

Abstract

Online training has now become an alternative means of delivering continuousprofessional development courses to improve teacher competencies. The benefits of online training are flexibility of access, cost efficiencies, ease of content updates, and uniformity of content. However, there are many aspects that determine if teachers can be successful in online training, and one is self-regulated learning. This study aims to profile self-regulated learning as case study in an online mathematics teacher training held by PPPPTK Matematika using GeoGebra. Using a survey method, this study describes the participants? self-regulated learning profile as they accomplished nine tasks in the GeoGebra course.
THE IMPACT OF GENDER, PARENTS’ EDUCATION LEVEL, AND SOCIO-ECONOMIC STATUS ON TURKISH STUDENTS’ MATHEMATICS PERFORMANCE Rusli, Rusli
Southeast Asian Mathematics Education Journal Vol 7, No 1 (2017)
Publisher : SEAMEO Regional Centre for QITEP in Mathematics

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (429.588 KB) | DOI: 10.46517/seamej.v7i1.45

Abstract

This paper describes secondary data analyses that investigate the impact of gender, parents? education level, and socio-economic status upon Turkish students? mathematics achievement in the Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) 2009. The analyses were done quantitatively using t-tests, one-way ANOVA, correlation and linear regression. The findings revealed that gender differences and Turkish students? mathematics performance are statistically significant but practically not significant. Parents? education level had an impact on Turkish students? mathematics achievements. The index of Economic, Social and Cultural Status (ESCS) had a positive effect on mathematics achievements and ESCS was a significant predictor of Turkish students? mathematics performance. The findings seem to suggest that at the school level, the school environment is expected to build students? motivation in learning, and the teachers in the classroom setting are expected to provide extra hours and learning consultation services for students who need it. At the student level, students were expected to have high motivation in learning and are suggested to not rely on learning facilities provided by their parents. However, further research is required prior to making any recommendations on school policy, teaching, and learning practice in the classroom setting.
WHAT CAN WE LEARN FROM THE ELPSA, SA, AND PSA FRAMEWORKS? THE EXPERIENCE OF SEAQIM Shadiq, Fadjar
Southeast Asian Mathematics Education Journal Vol 7, No 1 (2017)
Publisher : SEAMEO Regional Centre for QITEP in Mathematics

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (332.47 KB) | DOI: 10.46517/seamej.v7i1.46

Abstract

One of education problems in Indonesia according to Dr. Anies Baswedan, the former Minister of Education and Culture of the Republic of Indonesia, was: ?How to help Indonesian students to be independent learners and have good characters?? This question then raises an issue: ?What kinds of knowledge, skills, and attitudes are needed by our students to survive in the 21st Century and beyond?? Earlier the author stated (Shadiq, 2016a) that to change and improve the quality of the teaching and learning process from a ?typical? or ?traditional? mathematics classroom to a more innovative one was not easy. Afurther issue was: ?How to change real teaching practice?? Mathematics teachers need to experience ways that they will be expected to implement in their teaching. Isoda (2011) proposed a Problem Solving Approach (PSA) which consists of four steps: (1) problem posing, (2) independent solving, (3) comparison and discussion, and (4) summary and integration. In Indonesia, we can learn from Scientific Approach (SA) which covers five steps: (1) observing, (2) questioning, (3) collecting data or experimenting, (4) reasoning, and (5) communicating. In addition, Lowrie and Patahuddin (2015) proposed Experiences, Language, Pictures, Symbols, Application (ELPSA) as a lesson design framework for mathematics teaching and learning process. A problem is examined based on these three frameworks where at least 11 alternatives can be identified to solve it. The paper ends with some recommendations on how to improve Indonesian mathematics teaching.
RE-ENGAGING WITH PRIMARY MATHEMATICS THROUGH SUSTAINED PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT: A CASE STUDY Attard, Catherine
Southeast Asian Mathematics Education Journal Vol 7, No 1 (2017)
Publisher : SEAMEO Regional Centre for QITEP in Mathematics

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (550.433 KB) | DOI: 10.46517/seamej.v7i1.41

Abstract

This paper reports on aspects of a case study of sustained professional development to improve teacher and student engagement with mathematics. Teachers from Grades 3 to 6 in one Western Sydney primary school were involved with a professional development program over the course of 18 months. Prior to this, the teachers limited opportunities to engage with any mathematics-related professional development. The professional development program resulted in improved teacher engagement and the development of a community of practice within the school. Findings from the study align with recommendations from literature that teachers must be provided with opportunities for continuing professional development that is self-nominated and focused on individual needs as well as group needs.
STUDENTS’ PERCEPTION ON BOROBUDUR TEMPLE AS MATHEMATIC LEARNING RESOURCE Danoebroto, Sri Wulandari
Southeast Asian Mathematics Education Journal Vol 7, No 1 (2017)
Publisher : SEAMEO Regional Centre for QITEP in Mathematics

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (466.415 KB) | DOI: 10.46517/seamej.v7i1.47

Abstract

This study aims to describe junior high school student?s perception of Borobudur Temple as mathematic learning resources. Borobudur Temple is well known as having extraordinary architecture built algorithmically. The parts of Borobudur Temple such as the stupa, statue, and wall carvings (relief) consist of many geometric models. This study employs an ethnomathematics perspective in describing perceptions about cultural artefacts as a mathematical model. The result of this study may be used as a basis for developing meaningful mathematic learning in schools. The sample of the study was 313 students ofjunior high school located near Borobudur Temple. The measure of the sampling adequacy with KMO is 0.86 from which confirms that the number of the sample is sufficient. The data were collected using a questionnaire with Likert scale 1 to 4 with the following range: (1) disagree, (2) neutral, (3) agree, and (4) strongly agree. The exploratory factor analysis yielded three factors of perception of Borobudur Temple as a mathematic model, those are: (1) Borobudur Temple is a geometry model, (2) Borobudur Temple can be used as mathematic learning source at school, and (3) learning mathematics from Borobudur Temple is helpful for students. The total variance reached 49,572%. The value of Cronbach alpha was 0,8204 for the 14 items. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics to attain average items of mean and average standard deviation for each factor. The result of the research shows that: (1) students agree that Borobudur Temple is a geometry model, (2) Borobudur Temple can be used as mathematic learning source at school, and (3) learning mathematics from Borobudur Temple is helpful for them.

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