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Contact Name
Dermiyati
Contact Email
dermiyati.1963@fp.unila.ac.id
Phone
+62721781822
Journal Mail Official
j.tnhtrop@gmail.com
Editorial Address
Faculty of Agriculture, University of Lampung, Jl. Sumantri Brojonegoro No. 1, Bandarlampung 35145, Indonesia
Location
Kota bandar lampung,
Lampung
INDONESIA
Journal of Tropical Soils
Published by Universitas Lampung
ISSN : 0852257X     EISSN : 20866682     DOI : http://dx.doi.org/10.5400/jts.v25i1
Core Subject : Agriculture, Social,
Journal of Tropical Soils (JTS) publishes all aspects in the original research of soil science (soil physic and soil conservation, soil mineralogy, soil chemistry and soil fertility, soil biology and soil biochemical, soil genesis and classification, land survey and land evaluation, land development and management environmental), and related subjects in which using soil from tropical areas.
Articles 242 Documents
Soil Erosion Prediction Using GIS and Remote Sensing on Manjunto Watershed Bengkulu, Indonesia Gunawan, Gusta; Sutjiningsih, Dwita; Soeryantono, Herr; Widjanarko, Soelistiyoweni
JOURNAL OF TROPICAL SOILS Vol 18, No 2: May 2013
Publisher : UNIVERSITY OF LAMPUNG

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.5400/jts.2013.v18i2.141-148

Abstract

The study aims to assess the rate of erosion that occurred in Manjunto Watershed and financial loss using Geographic Information System and Remote Sensing. Model used to determine the erosion is E30 models. The basis for the development of this model is to integrate with the slope of the slope between NDVI. The value of NDVI obtained from satellite imagery. Slope factor obtained through the DEM processing. To determine the amount of economic losses caused by erosion used the shadow prices. The amount of nutrients lost converted to fertilizer price. The results showed that the eroded catchment area has increased significantly. The rate of average annual erosion in the watershed Manjunto in 2000 amounted to 3 Mg ha-1 yr-1. The average erosion rate in the watershed Manjunto annual increase to 27 Mg ha-1 yr-1 in the year 2009. Economic losses due to erosion in 2009 was Rp200,000,- for one hectare. Total losses due to erosion for the total watershed area is Rp15,918,213,133, -. The main factor causing the high rate of erosion is high rainfall, slope and how to grow crops that do not pay attention to the rules of conservation.Keywords: Soil erosion, digital elevation model, GIS, remote sensing, valuation erosion[How to Cite: Gunawan G, D Sutjiningsih, H Soeryantono and S Widjanarko. 2013.Soil Erosion Prediction Using GIS and Remote Sensing on Manjunto Watershed Bengkulu-Indonesia. J Trop Soils 18 (2): 141-148. Doi: 10.5400/jts.2013.18.2.141][Permalink/DOI: www.dx.doi.org/10.5400/jts.2013.18.2.141]REFERENCESAksoy E, G Ozsoy and MS Dirim. 2009. Soil mapping approach in GIS using Landsat satellite imagery and DEM data. Afr J Agric Res 4: 1295-1302.Ananda J and G Herath. 2003. Soil erosion in developing countries: a socio-economic appraisal. J Environ Manage 68: 343-353.Ananda J, G Herath and A Chisholm. 2001. Determination of yield and Erosion Damage Functions Using Subjectivly Elicited Data: application to Smallholder Tea in Sri Lanka. Aust J Agric Resour Ec 45: 275-289.Ande OT, Y Alaga and GA Oluwatosin. 2009. Soil erosion prediction using MMF model on highly dissected hilly terrain of Ekiti environs in southwestern Nigeria. Int J Phys Sci 4: 053-057.Arnold JG, BA Engel and R Srinivasan. 1998. A continuous time grid cell watershed model. Proc. of application of Advanced Technology for management of Natural Resources.Arsyad S.  2010. Konservasi Tanah dan Air. IPB Press. Bogor-Indonesia (in Indonesian).Asdak C.1995. Hydrology and Watershed Management. Gadjah Mada University Press, Yogyakarta.Barlin RD and ID Moore. 1994. Role of buffer strips in management of waterway pollution: a review. Environ Manage 18: 543-58.Brough PA.1986. Principle of Geographical Information Systems For Land Resources Assessment. Oxford University Press, 194p.Clark B and J Wallace. 2003. Global connections: Canadian and world issues. Toronto, Canada: Pearson Education Canada, Inc.Cochrane T A and DC Flanagan. 1999. Assessing water erosion in small watershed using WEPP with GIS and digital elevation models. J Soil Water Conserv 54: 678 685.Dames TWg. 1955. The Soils of East Central Java; with a Soil Map 1:250,000. Balai Besar Penjelidikan Pertanian, Bogor, Indonesia.Dixon JA, LF Scura, RA Carpenter and PB Sherman. 2004. Economic Analysis of Environmental Impacts 2nd ed. Eartscans Publication Ltd., London.Fistikoglu O and NB Harmancioglu. 2002. Integration of GIS with USLE in Assessment of Soil Erosion. Water Resour Manage 16: 447-467.Green K. 1992. Spatial imagery and GIS: integrated data for natural resource management. J Forest 90: 32-36.Hazarika MK and H Honda. 2001. Estimation of Soil Erosion Using Remote Sensing and GIS, Its Valuation & Economic Implications on Agricultural Productions. The 10th International Soil Conservation Organization Meeting at Purdue University and the USDA-ARS Soil Erosion Research Laboratory.Hazarika S, R Parkinson, R Bol, L Dixon, P Russell, S Donovan and D Allen. 2009. Effect of tillage system and straw management on organic matter dynamics. Agron Sustain Develop 29: 525-533. doi: 10.1051/agro/2009024. Honda KL, A Samarakoon, Y Ishibashi, Mabuchi and S Miyajima.1996. Remote Sensing and GIS technologies for denudation estimation in Siwalik watershed of Nepal,p. B21-B26. Proc. 17th Asian Conference on Remote Sensing, Colombo, Sri lanka.Kefi M and K Yoshino. 2010. Evaluation of The Economic Effects of Soil Erosion Risk on Agricultural Productivity Using Remote Sensing: Case of Watershed in Tunisia. International Archives of the Photogrammetry, Remote Sensing and Spatial Information Science, Volume XXXVIII, Part 8, Kyoto Japan.Kefi M, K Yoshino, K Zayani and H Isoda. 2009. Estimation of soil loss by using combination of Erosion Model and GIS: case of study watersheds in Tunisia. J Arid Land Stud 19: 287-290.Lal R. 1998. Soil erosion impact on agronomic productivity and environment quality: Critical Review. Plant Sci 17: 319-464.Lal. 2001. Soil Degradation by Erosion. Land Degrad Develop12: 519-539.Lanya I. 1996. Evaluasi Kualitas lahan dan Produktivitas Lahan Kering Terdegradasi di Daerah Transmigrasi WPP VII Rengat Kabupaten Indragiri Hulu, Riau. [Disertasi Doktor]. Program Pasca Sarjana IPB, Bogor (in Indonesian).Mermut AR and H Eswaran. 2001. Some major developments in soil science since the mid 1960s. Geoderma 100: 403-426.Mongkolsawat C, P Thurangoon and Sriwongsa.1994. Soil erosion mapping with USLE and GIS. Proc. Asian Conf. Rem. Sens., C-1-1 to C-1-6.Morgan RPC, Morgan DDV and Finney HJ. 1984. A predictive model for the assessment of erosion risk. J Agric Eng Res 30: 245-253.Morgan RPC. 2005. Soil Erosion and Conservation. 3rd ed. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing Co.Panuju DR,  F Heidina, BH Trisasongko, B Tjahjono, A Kasno, AHA Syafril. 2009. Variasi nilai indeks vegetasi MODIS pada siklus pertumbuhan padi. J.Ilmiah Geomat. 15, 9-16 (in Indonesian).Pimentel D, C Harvey, P Resosudarmo, K. Sinclair, D Kurz, M Mc Nair, S Christ, L Shpritz, L Fitton, R Saffouri and R Balir. 1995. Environmental and Economic Costs of Soil Erosion and Conservation Benefits. Science 267: 1117-1123.Saha SK and LM Pande. 1993. Integrated approach towards soil erosion inventory for environmental conservation using satellite and agrometeorological data. Asia Pac Rem Sens J 5: 21-28.Saha SK, Kudrat M and Bhan SK.1991. Erosional soil loss prediction using digital satellitee data and USLE. In: S Murai (ed).  Applications of Remote Sensing in Asia and Oceania – Environmental Change Monitoring.  Asian Association of Remote Sensing, pp. 369-372.Salehi MH, Eghbal MK and Khademi H. 2003. Comparison of soil variability in a detailed and a reconnaissance soil map in central Iran. Geoderma 111: 45-56.Soil Survey Staff.  1998.  Keys to Soil Taxonomy. Eighth Edition. United States Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service. Washington, D.C.
The Growth of Oil Palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) Seedlings with the Application of Different Arbuscular Mycorrhiza Fungi and Various Phosphorous Dosages Krisnarini, Krisnarini; Rini, Maria Viva; Timotiwu, Paul Benyamin
JOURNAL OF TROPICAL SOILS Vol 23, No 3: September 2018
Publisher : UNIVERSITY OF LAMPUNG

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.5400/jts.2018.v23i3.117-124

Abstract

The effectiveness of Arbuscular Mycorrhiza Fungi (AMF) colonization depends on the type of AMF, plant species and phosphorus fertilization.  The aims of this study were to determine: the best type of AMF and the appropriate dosage of P fertilizer for the growth of oil palm seedlings, and whether the oil palm seedling responses to the application of AMF type is determined by the dosage of phosphorus applied. The experiment was arranged in a Randomized Complete Block Design (RCBD) with two factors and 5 replications. The first factor was the types of AMF (m), consisting of without mycorrhiza inoculation (m0), Gigaspora sp. MV16 isolate (m1), Glomus sp. MV7 isolate (m2), Gigaspora sp. MV16 isolate + Glomus sp. MV7 (m3) isolate.  The second factor was phosphorus fertilization (SP-36), consisting of 3 levels: 1/3 recommended dosage (p1), 2/3 recommended dosage (p2), full recommended dosage (p3). The results showed that the application of all AMF types resulted in the same effects on the growth of oil palm seedlings, however the seedling growth in the inoculated plants were better than in uninoculated plants (control). The application of the recommended dosage of P fertilizer produced the highest seedling growth. The response of seedlings to the application of AMF type was not determined by doses of phosphorus fertilizer applied.
Ameliorant Application on Variation of Carbon Stock and Ash Content on Peatland South Kalimantan Nurzakiah, Siti; Agus, Fahmuddin; Syahbuddin, Haris
JOURNAL OF TROPICAL SOILS Vol 18, No 1: January 2013
Publisher : UNIVERSITY OF LAMPUNG

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.5400/jts.2013.v18i1.11-16

Abstract

Carbon stock on peatlands are large and will be easily emitted if the land is opened or drained, therefore the measurements of  carbon stocks and ash content are important to know the amount of emissions and agricultural sustainability in peatlands. This study aimed to determine carbon stock and ash content on peatlands in the Indonesia Climate Change Trust Fund (ICCTF) located in South Kalimantan on the geographic position S. 03°25’52" and E. 114°47’6.5". The experiment consisted of six treatments of ameliorant materials namely; mineral soil, peat fertilizer A, peat fertilizer T, manure, ash, and control.  The results showed that the variation of peat soil properties was very high at this location. Peat thickness ranged from 36-338 cm, and this led to high variations in carbon stocks ranged between 161.8 – 1142.2 Mg ha-1. Besides ash contents of the soil were also highly varied ranged from 3.4 – 28.5%. This natural variation greatly affected the ICCTF study design. Mineral soil treatment had a mean carbon stock (961.3 ± 61.5 Mg ha-1) which was higher and different from other treatments. High ash content was obtained in the ash treatment (18.6 ± 2.5%) and manure (15.7 ± 3.6%).  It is recommended that the analysis of plant responses and greenhouse gas emissions using a single regression analysis and multiple regression with ash content as one of the independent variables are needed.Keywords: Ash content, carbon stock, peatland,  peat thickness[How to Cite: Nurzakiah S, F Agus, and H Syahbuddin. 2013. Ameliorant Application on Variation of Carbon Stock and Ash Content on Peatland South Kalimantan J Trop Soils, 18 (1) : 11-16. doi: 10.5400/jts.2013.18.1.11][Permalink/DOI: www.dx.doi.org/10.5400/jts.2013.18.1.11]  
Soil Erosion Prediction Using GIS and RUSLE: Study at Sampean Watershed Faisol, Arif; Indarto, Indarto
JOURNAL OF TROPICAL SOILS Vol 15, No 2: May 2010
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Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.5400/jts.2010.v15i2.147-152

Abstract

Soil Erosion Prediction Using GIS and RUSLE: Study at Sampean Watershed (A Faisol and Indarto): Erosion is one  factor that cause soil degradation in Indonesia. RUSLE (Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation) is widely used to predict average annual rate of soil erosion. This research integrate the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) and Geographic Information System (GIS) to predict potential soil erosion losses. Study was conducted at Sampean Watershed where located in Eastern part of East Java. Firstly, GIS layer was obtained from available database that cover East Java Province. All treatment of GIS layer was done using Mapwindows GIS. Furthermore, RUSLE method was used to predict rate of soil erosion from GIS layer treated previously.  Results showed that up to 82% (102,921 ha) area of the watershed have tolerable soil erosion rate.
Land Suitability Index for Estimating Sugar Cane Productivity in the Humid Tropics of South Sulawesi Indonesia Neswati, Risma; Lopulisa, Christianto; Nathan, Muhammad; Ramlan, Andi
JOURNAL OF TROPICAL SOILS Vol 21, No 2: May 2016
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Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.5400/jts.2016.v21i2.115-122

Abstract

This research was completed using mixed qualitative and quantitative methods. Field surveys were executed in sugar cane plantation throughout South Sulawesi Indonesia. Land suitability analyses were performed using a parametric approach with Storie’s index equation followed up with  correlation analysis using the Pearson correlation. Results revealed that the period for sugarcane crop growth in the humid tropic relatively dry regions of South Sulawesi Indonesia lasted for the months of November to July.  The land suitability for sugar cane in the research location was moderately suitable (S2c) and marginally suitable (S3c, S3s, S3s,f and S3c,w) with limiting factors such as relative humidity during crop maturation phase, the duration of sunlight, soil depth, soil texture, soil pH and soil drainage. Land suitability index at the research location ranged from 25.2 to 55.0; sugar cane yields ranged from 30.3 to 62.0 Mg ha-1 year-1. Pearson correlation coefficient (r) between LSI with cane and sugar productivity were 0.81 and 0.84 respectively, signifying the strength of the correlation between the two values. This also indicates that land suitability index can be estimating the potential crop yield in the humid tropicsthat relatively dry climate regions.
Activity of Soil Microorganisms During the Growth of Sweet Corn (Zea Mays Saccharata Sturt) in the Second Planting Time with the Application of Fertilizers and Biochar Dermiyati, .; Karyanto, Agus; Niswati, Ainin; Lumban Raja, Jamalam; Triyono, Sugeng; Harini, Nyang Vania Ayuningtyas
JOURNAL OF TROPICAL SOILS Vol 22, No 1: January 2017
Publisher : UNIVERSITY OF LAMPUNG

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.5400/jts.2017.v22i1.37-45

Abstract

Efforts to increase the production of sweet corn can be done with the application of fertilizers, either inorganic, organic orits combination. In addition, the application of soil amendments such as biochar is also expected to improve soil fertility that will indirectly increase the production of sweet corn.Organonitrophos fertilizer is an organic fertilizer developed by lecturers of Faculty of Agriculture, University of Lampung. The research was aimed to study effect the combination of organonitrophos, and inorganic fertilizers, biochar and the interaction between fertilizer combination and biochar on soil respiration and soil microbial biomass.The research was conducted in the Integrated Field Laboratory of Lampung University using 6x2 factorial in a Randomized Block Design with 3 replications. The first factor was six levels combination of organonitrophos and inorganic fertilizers (P0, P1, P2, P3, P4, and P5). The second factor was two levels of biochar dosage (B0 and B1). Data was analyzed by Analysis of Variance and followed by the Least Significant Difference (LSD)Test at 5% level. The observed variables were soil microorganism activity likely soil respiration and soil microbial biomass. The results showed that P3B1treatment (300 kg Urea ha-1, 125 kg SP-36 ha-1, 100 kg KCl ha-1 + 2500 kg organoitrophos ha-1) was the highest soil respiration at of 60 days after planting (DAP). P5 treatment (5000 kg Organonitrophos ha-1) has the highest soil microbial biomasscompared to other treatments at 60 and 90 DAP. B1 treatment (5000 kg biochar ha-1) has higher soil respiration and soil microbial biomasscompared to treatment (0 kg biochar ha-1. There was an interaction between combination of organonitrophos and inorganic fertilizers and biochar on soil respiration at 90 DAP. However, there was no interaction between fertilizer combination and biochar on soil microbial biomass.Keywords: Biochar, Fertilizer Combination, Organonitrophos, Soil Microbial Biomass Carbon and Soil Respiration
Temporal Variation and Respons of Mangrove Soil on Solar Illumination Changes Medellu, Christophil; Soemarno, .; Marsoedi, .; Berhimpon, Sigfried
JOURNAL OF TROPICAL SOILS Vol 17, No 2: May 2012
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Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.5400/jts.2012.v17i2.165-172

Abstract

Research on soil temperature in mangrove forest is a part of the mangrove ecosystem microclimate research. Studieson microclimate variables interaction, including soil temperature is important and interesting because it is associatedwith ecosystem and environmental changes, and the biota living in it. This study developed a mathematical modelingof soil temperatures and solar illumination in mangrove forest and the surrounding environment. Mathematicalmodeling function was constructed using data measured on three transects which different in ecosystem condition.The results showed that the mathematical modeling parameters produced the parameters of solar illumination andsoil temperatures that were difference for the three transects. Time lag of soil temperature on solar illumination wasalso diference in the three transects due to the difference of penetration of sun radiation and soil inundation by seawater. These parameters also showed the differences between the soil temperature in mangrove with the soiltemperature in terrestrial forest as studied by the former researcher. Our research demonstrated the charachteristicof soil temperature in mangrove, that was not merely controlled by sun radiation, but also it was contribute by thesea water and other factors.[How to Cite: Medellu C, Soemarno, Marsoedi and S Berhimpon. 2012. Temporal Variation and Respons of Mangrove Soil on Solar Illumination Changes. J Trop Soils 17 (2) : 67-74. Doi: 10.5400/jts.2012.17.2.165][Permalink/DOI: www.dx.doi.org/10.540/jts.2012.17.2.165]
Identification and Decomposition of Five Dominant Wild plants from Acid Swampland in South Sumatra Bernas, Siti Masreah; Wijaya, Andi; Parlindungan, Effendy Sagala; Fitri, Siti Nurul Aidil
JOURNAL OF TROPICAL SOILS Vol 20, No 3: September 2015
Publisher : UNIVERSITY OF LAMPUNG

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.5400/jts.2015.v20i3.149-155

Abstract

There were five emergence plants in swampland such as Polygonum barbatum, Neptunia prostrata, Phragmites karka, Ludwigia adscendens and Phragmites communis, which might be used for compost source, all the plants were easily adapted and grew very well on acid soil.  These plants were choosen because of abudancy and size. All plants were identified, collected, chopped and weighted then put in a 50 liters plastic drum for decomposting during 12 weeks. Composts temperature were monitored every week, nutrients content (N, P, K, Ca, Mg, Na) and compost chemical properties (C-organic, C.E.C., C/N ratio) were analysed every two weeks. Results showed that each compost from different plant varied in nutrients content and chemical properties.  Compost made of Neptunia prostata Lam. contained highest nutrients than others, it’s nutrients were N (4%), P (1675 mg kg-1), K (5.6 %), Ca (0.32 %), Mg (0.32 %) and Na (0.12 %) and the lowest nutrients content showed by compost of Phragmites karka Retz. in which N (2.4 %), P (1160 mg kg-1), K (2.62 %), Ca (0.04 %), Mg (0.07 %), and Na (0.03 %).  It seem broadleaf plants tended to have higher nutrients content than grasses or graminae. Neptunia prostrata compost had a high N content due to it’s leguminosae plant. Al and Fe were low in all composts, therefore all plants were recommended for organic nutrient sources. [How to Cite: Siti MB, A Wijaya, EP  Sagala  and SNA  Fitri. 2015. Identification and Decomposition of  Five Dominant Wild plants from Acid Swampland in South Sumatra. J Trop Soils 20: 149-155. Doi: 10.5400/jts.2015.20.3.149] 
Extreme High Yield of Tropical Rice Grown Without Fertilizer on Acid Sulfate Soil in South Kalimantan, Indonesia Purnomo, Erry; Hashidoko, Yasuyuki; Hasegawa, Toshihiro; Osaki, Mitsuru
JOURNAL OF TROPICAL SOILS Vol 15, No 1: January 2010
Publisher : UNIVERSITY OF LAMPUNG

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.5400/jts.2010.v15i1.33-38

Abstract

Extreme High Yield of Tropical Rice Grown Without Fertilizer on Acid Sulfate Soil in South Kalimantan, Indonesia (E Purnomo, Y Hashidoko, T Hasegawa and M Osaki): Local rice arieties are commonly grown by the farmers located in acid sulfate soil area of South Kalimantan. In South Kalimantan, more than 100 local rice varieties can be found. In 1999, a farmer found one hill (with 5 tillers) rice plant near a canal, later called Padi Panjang. The rice had panicle length of 50 cm. The panicle length of common local rice varieties are 25 cm. Since the finding, the farmer multiplied the seed for 3 years to get a reasonable amount of seeds for nearby farmers to use. In 2004, there were 25 farmers grow the Padi Panjang by themselves. Their paddocks are widely spread out in Aluh-Aluh and Gambut districts. We take this opportunity to investigate yield variation of the Padi Panjang that may be affected by soil properties variability. Ten paddocks out of the 25 paddock were selected. At harvest time (in July-August), we measured the rice yield and collected soil sample from the 10 paddocks. We found that the soil condition in the selected paddocks were marginally suitable for growing improved rice. Without fertilizer, however, the rice yield varied from 3.21 to 8.09 Mg ha-1. We also observed that the rice yield variations associated with tillers number. We did not find any correlation between rice yields with some selected soil properties, except it was observed that the tillers number was negatively correlated with soil electrical conductivity (EC). The extreme yield of Padi Panjang might be explained the involvement of N fixing bacteria and P solubilizing bacteria, large rooting system and the ability of Padi Panjang root in modifying the rhizosphere soil.
Application of a Multispectral SPOT Image for Land Use Classification in Sampean Watershed Irawan, Januar Fery; Indarto, .
JOURNAL OF TROPICAL SOILS Vol 16, No 2: May 2011
Publisher : UNIVERSITY OF LAMPUNG

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.5400/jts.2011.v16i2.176-181

Abstract

This article described the process of land use classification at Sampean Watershed. The research was conducted in Sampean watershed to calculate the land use area using a multispectral SPOT image. Two SPOT image scenes were used to identify and classify the main nomenclature of land use. The research applied level 2A of SPOT image raw data which were obtained during 2004. Research methodology consisted of geometric correction of Image; image enhancement using high sharpen filter; un-supervised classification and supervised classification. The classification algorithm used the maximum likelihood in which pixels was classified based on their spectral signature. Severaltraining areas were identified to define the region area. Supervised classification could classified 9 class of land uses, the classification of land use consist of irrigated paddy field (56.05%), rain fed paddy field (0.89%), forest (10.75%), urban area (8.69%), plantation (4.22%), barren land (11.19%), river (0.05%), cropland (7.98%), and bushes (0.19%). The overall classification accuracy was 84.21%. This work will be useful for hydrological modelling and management planning of the Watershed.

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