cover
Contact Name
Wuri Soedjatmiko
Contact Email
wuri.soedjatmiko@ukwms.ac.id
Phone
+6231 - 5678478
Journal Mail Official
info-gradschool@ukwms.ac.id
Editorial Address
Program Pascasarjana - Program Studi Magister Pendidikan Bahasa Inggris Lantai 5 Gedung Agustinus, Unika Widya Mandala Jl. Dinoyo no. 42-44, Surabaya
Location
Kota surabaya,
Jawa timur
INDONESIA
Beyond Words : a journal on language education, applied linguistics and curriculum & instructions
ISSN : 24606308     EISSN : 23386339     DOI : https://doi.org/10.33508/bw
Core Subject : Education, Social,
The demand of continuous academic improvement has urged scholars to do research and share knowledge in writing. Widya Mandala Graduate School accommodates these academic scholarly needs by providing the journal entitled Beyond Words This twice-a-year, refereed, journal accepts a wide variety of both theoretical and practical manuscripts around the following fields applied linguistics, language education and the topics under each theme could vary from general education to classroom language teaching and the role of IT.
Articles 100 Documents
Indonesians, Not Using Indonesian: Indonesian Students’ at the University of Nottingham’s Preference to Use English and/or Chinese on WeChat Moments Nathania, Nadia
Beyond Words Vol 5, No 2 (2017)
Publisher : Widya Mandala Catholic University Surabaya

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.33508/bw.v5i2.1594

Abstract

WeChat is one of the world’s leading mobile application that has over one billion users inside and outside of China. WeChat is actively used by a group of approximately one hundred Indonesian students studying in the University of Nottingham Ningbo, China due to its convenience as a communication platform while studying in China. This study focuses on how language users accommodate each other, while showing identities and language attitudes through their choice of language in their digital practices on WeChat. The investigation has shown how Indonesian students in UNNC likely prefer to post on WeChat Moments using English and/or Chinese instead of Indonesia. It has pointed out how the participants have created a pattern of language preferences used on WeChat Moments to accommodate their contacts by converging with them and also diverging from them creating a unique identity as Indonesian students in UNNC. Their language preferences result from their attitudes of the English, Chinese and Indonesian language individually affected by social and political factors in their community
A Unified Analysis of English Passive Voice and Aspects Dwijatmoko, Benedictus B.
Beyond Words Vol 7, No 1 (2019)
Publisher : Widya Mandala Catholic University Surabaya

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.33508/bw.v7i1.2039

Abstract

English passive voice and aspects are generated in the same process and have the same D-structure. In a passive sentence, progressive sentence, and perfect sentence, T (tense) takes a VP headed by be or have, and be or have takes a Participle Phrase (PartP), and –en or –ingtakes a VP as its complement. Be or have in the upper VP merges with T, and the verb in the lower VP merges with Part. The specifier or complement of the lower VP moves cyclicly through the specifier of Part and the specifier of the upper verb to occupy the subject position. The single theory on the production of passive, progressive, and perfect sentences observes the principle of economy of derivation and, therefore, contributes to the explanation of the relative easiness of a child in acquiring his or her mother tongue.
Contrastive and Error Analyses in Inverted Order to Facilitate English Language Teaching Saini, Shivani
Beyond Words Vol 4, No 2 (2016)
Publisher : Widya Mandala Catholic University Surabaya

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.33508/bw.v4i2.944

Abstract

Both Contrastive and Error Analysis have vital roles in accounting for problems in teaching English as a foreign/second language (TEFL/TESL). Contrastive Analysis (CA) compares languages and makes predictions about possible errors learners make due to the influence of their first language (L1), while Error Analysis (EA) analyses pupils’ compositions or conversations and investigates different sources of errors one of which is cross linguistic influence. It is obvious that CA and EA are not the same. They overlap in a certain area, but they are not competing against each other. Both CA and EA can be used in a complementary role in understanding learners’ errors in second language learning. In the present article, a teaching methodology (“a contrastive approach” to EA) will be explored where the traditional order of conducting CA and EA (where CA leads to EA) has been inverted. The approach in the present study is that the job of diagnosis belongs to EA and here CA can be used as complementary to EA as a remedial procedure
Designing Game-based Learning To Foster The Cross Cultural Cognition Limantoro, Singgih Widodo; Datu, Yerly Arnold
Beyond Words Vol 7, No 2 (2019)
Publisher : Widya Mandala Catholic University Surabaya

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.33508/bw.v7i2.2170

Abstract

Boredom would be the biggest challenge in realizing a successful learning - effective and joyful learning. Boredom could happen in any learning when the students learn what they do not need or and they do not enjoy the conventional way of learning. In this case study, the writer would design game-based learning to foster the cross cultural cognition in Business Cross Cultural materials. By designing and playing games for learning BCC materials, the writer tried to create the effective and joyful learning. In this research, the writer would use fives phases of the research in designing the game-based learning. Moreover, the writer would investigate their joy and effectiveness of learning by using two different groups of totally 40 participants of Business English students that learn BCC - the experiment group that would use the game-based learning and the controlling group that had learnt without it. And the research results are there was insignificant difference in cognitive learning but the game-based learning could enhance the joy and motivation of learning.
Collaborative Learning or Cooperative Learning? The Name Is Not Important; Flexibility Is Jacobs, George M.
Beyond Words Vol 3, No 1 (2015)
Publisher : Widya Mandala Catholic University Surabaya

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.33508/bw.v3i1.676

Abstract

Abstract A great deal of theory and research, not to mention students’ and teachers’ practical experience, supports the use of group activities in education. Collaborative learning and cooperative learning are two terms commonly used in discussions of how and why to use group activities. This article looks at the issue of whether the two terms collaborative learning and cooperative learning are synonymous or whether they represent different conceptualisations of how and why students should interact as part of their learning. Those scholars who differentiate the two terms often see collaborative learning as more student centred and cooperative learning as a more teacher centred way to facilitate student-student interaction. The present article argues that collaborative and cooperative learning should be seen as synonymous student centric approaches, and that teachers and students, regardless of which of the two terms they use, should and will vary the ways they shape their learning environments in order to best facilitate the cognitive and affective benefits that student-student interaction offers. Keywords: Collaborative learning, cooperative learning, flexibility
Subsidiary Characters in Select William Gillette’s Play Aaradhana, .; Dwivedi, Amitabh V.
Beyond Words Vol 6, No 1 (2018)
Publisher : Widya Mandala Catholic University Surabaya

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.33508/bw.v6i1.1672

Abstract

Contemporary literature and recent media studies have taken so much from the genre called “Sensational Novels”, that even though this genre emerged in the late nineteenth century, it became hugely popular in the twentieth century, and also drew the attention of the present generation. The Detective fiction first presented to the world by Wilkie Collins, was introduced during the time when the concept and performance of the great detective and the sensation genre was blooming. One such work which became popular during that time was the narrative by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle centering on Sherlock Holmes. The aim of this paper is to examine the intriguing characters which Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and William Gillette constructed in the play of Sherlock Holmes. This consultant detective laid its impact on the readers in the nineteenth century, when it was first published, but even in the present times it had not lost its charms. The character of Sherlock Holmes became a sensational figure, due to which it had been the center of research by the scholars; however, the minor characters were studied seldomly. The paper with the help of Narratology, seeks to examine the William Gillette’s play; wherein, to show that the minor characters are essential for the development of the main protagonist, the narrative of the subsidiary characters will be analysed.
Using Students’ Authentic Writings to Teach an Apprenticeship Report Datu, Yerly A.
Beyond Words Vol 1, No 1 (2013)
Publisher : Widya Mandala Catholic University Surabaya

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.33508/bw.v1i1.372

Abstract

An Apprenticeship Report as one of the obligatory products that students of Business English of Politeknik Ubaya have to produce becomes an important requirement since, during the writing process, it also involves the company where the students undergo the apprenticeship in their last semester. Having examined their writings, I found quite troublesome linguistic accuracy in their writings. Due to these most frequently occurring errors, I was finally triggered to make use their authentic writings as my teaching sources. Then, to follow up, I intentionally collected their works to be selected to be the teaching sources as I believed that bringing authenticity in the classroom produce positive feedback and substantial language learning (Reid, 1993: 177). Therefore, in this paper, I discussed further about the use of authentic materials and approaches in teaching writing using authentic materials. To obtain information whether authentic materials gave positive responses from the students or not, a set of questionnaire was distributed to them in all stages; pre-, whilst-, and post-writing. Overall results have shown positive responses from the students as they were exposed to their seniors’ authentic writings and experienced authentic-materials-based activities which I designed purposely for them.
Information and Communication Technology to Help Students Create Their Own Books the Dialogic Way Ivone, Francisca Maria; Jacobs, George M; Santosa, Made Hery
Beyond Words Vol 8, No 2 (2020): November
Publisher : Widya Mandala Catholic University Surabaya

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.33508/bw.v8i2.2545

Abstract

The use of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in language learning allows students to be more engaged and innovative. The present article explores the potential use of technology in the planning, drafting, reviewing, and publishing stages of students’ own book creation. First, the use of digital tools to create books in an interactive and engaging process and format is discussed. Then, the varieties of multimedia books created using ICT are explored. Next, the use of technology for sharing ideas, communicating opinions, collaborating, and reviewing others’ books is explained. The article also describes some collaborative methods students may employ in creating books. Finally, it discusses learners’ development of technology and media literacy in the creation of their own books.
A Demonstrative Analysis of News Articles Using Fairclough’s Critical Discourse Analysis Framework Briones, Roy Randy Y.
Beyond Words Vol 5, No 1 (2017)
Publisher : Widya Mandala Catholic University Surabaya

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.33508/bw.v5i1.1117

Abstract

This paper attempts to demonstrate Norman Fairclough’s Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA) framework by conducting internal and external level analyses on two online news articles that report on the Moro Islamic Liberation Front’s (MILF) submission of its findings on the “Mamasapano Incident” that happened in the Philippines in 2015. In performing analyses using this framework, the social context and background for these texts, as well as the relationship between the internal discourse features and the external social practices and structures in which the texts were produced are thoroughly examined. As a result, it can be noted that from the texts’ internal discourse features, the news articles portray ideological and social distinctions among social actors such as the Philippine Senate, the SAF troopers, the MILF, the MILF fighters, and the civilians. Moreover, from the viewpoint of the texts as being external social practices, the texts maintain institutional identities as news reports, but they also reveal some evaluative stance as exemplified by the adjectival phrases that the writers employed. Having both the internal and external features examined, it can be said that the way these texts were written seems to portray power relations that exist between the Philippine government and the MILF. Key words: Critical Discourse Analysis, discourse analysis, news articles, social practices, social structures, power relations
Authority, Academic Discourse and Ideology in the ESL Writing Class: An ESL teacher’s experience Kanakri, Aseel
Beyond Words Vol 3, No 2 (2015)
Publisher : Widya Mandala Catholic University Surabaya

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.33508/bw.v3i2.736

Abstract

This paper describes an ESL teachers’ perspective on teaching ESL writing to advanced second language learners reflecting on her experience as an ESL teachers drawing on the students’ responses to survey questions. It shows that writing in English as a Second language has political, cultural, and historical aspects since the “nature and functions of discourse, audience, and persuasive appeals often differ across linguistic, cultural, and educational contexts” In addition, acquiring the discourse proprieties is challenging because they represent culturally bound, conventionalized, and abstract characteristics of academic prose that are frequently absent in written discourse in rhetorical traditions other than the English dominant educational environments. ESL teachers should get the awareness of the needs and challenges that the face and understand the linguistic, cultural, and educational background they are coming from in order to help them overcome these challenges which also should dictate the instructional pedagogies, curriculum and assessment. Keywords: academic discourse, ESL writing, teacher’s perspective, ideology

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