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INDONESIA
JOURNAL OF INDONESIAN ISLAM
ISSN : 19786301     EISSN : 23556994     DOI : -
Core Subject : Religion, Social,
The Journal of Indonesian Islam (printed ISSN 1978-6301 and online ISSN 2355-6994) is a refereed academic journal published biannually by the Post­gra­duate Program (PPs) and the Institute for the Study of Religion and Society (LSAS), the State Institute for Islamic Studies (IAIN) Sunan Ampel Surabaya (SK Rektor No: In.03.1/HK.00.5/SK/408/P/2006). The journal puts emphasis on aspects related to Islamic studies in an Indonesian context, with special reference to culture, politics, society, eco­no­mics, history, and doctrines. It cordially invites contributions from scholars of related disciplines.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 238 Documents
MADRASA BY ANY OTHER NAME: Pondok, Pesantren, and Islamic Schools in Indonesia and Larger Southeast Asian Region Lukens-Bull, Ronald
JOURNAL OF INDONESIAN ISLAM Vol 4, No 1 (2010)
Publisher : State Islamic University (UIN) of Sunan Ampel Surabaya

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (291.647 KB) | DOI: 10.15642/JIIS.2010.4.1.1-21

Abstract

After more than a decade studying the Indonesian pesantren, the author had an opportunity to visit similar institutions in Thailand. After placing them in historical context, this paper explores how these institutions vary in Southeast Asia. Although it is reasonable to presume that pondok between different countries and areas in the region started out virtually indistinguishable in form and function, local and national histories have shaped them differently. This paper explicitly compares pondok in three distinct areas: Indonesia, Nakhon Sri Thammarat, and the Deep South in Thailand; the former two based on fieldwork and the latter based on literature review. It is common for some analysts and governments to associate pondok with violence. The evidence suggests that this is misplaced. The paper concludes that before an authoritative statement can be made on this point, more research is needed.
IN SEARCH OF SOCIO-HISTORICAL ROOTS OF SOUTHEAST ASIA’S ISLAMIST TERRORISM: With Special Reference to an Indonesian Experience Al Qurtuby, Sumanto
JOURNAL OF INDONESIAN ISLAM Vol 4, No 2 (2010)
Publisher : State Islamic University (UIN) of Sunan Ampel Surabaya

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (249.496 KB) | DOI: 10.15642/JIIS.2010.4.2.205-239

Abstract

This paper examines socio-historical roots of Southeast Asia’s Islamist terrorism. Specifically focusing on cases of terrorism in Indonesia, it deals with global, regional, and local factors that underline the emergence of “radical Islamism” as the roots of modern terrorism. Although there had been some connections between Southeast Asia’s militant Islamists to Afghanistan-based jihadists, an emphasis on the Al-Qaeda-centric paradigm as a framework for analyzing the rise of the region’s terrorism is over-exaggerated. This analytical emphasis tends to ignore the international, regional and local agencies outside Al-Qaeda as well as local political dynamics and socio-historical grounds that have contributed to the appearance of radical Islamism. Subscribing to Edward Said’s “travelling theory”, this paper argues that the idea of terrorism travels, not only from “person to person, from situation to situation, from one period to another” in a socio-historical vacuum, but also in response to specific historical and social changes. The idea of “radical Islamism” travels particularly from Afghanistan and elsewhere to Southeast Asia, especially Indonesia.
الديمقراطية بإندونيسيا Lubis, Amani Burhanuddin
JOURNAL OF INDONESIAN ISLAM Vol 4, No 2 (2010)
Publisher : State Islamic University (UIN) of Sunan Ampel Surabaya

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (253.606 KB) | DOI: 10.15642/JIIS.2010.4.2.413-437

Abstract

Democratic system has been implemented in Indonesia for more than ten years. There is no doubt in the success of the implementation of this democracy. However, in fact, the democracy reaches the phase of transition and is in the way of improvement through the democratization of the systems and the rule of law and ethics. This paper deals with this transition processes for maintaining the system and rule of law. The Constitutional Court as a judicial body is independent and autonomous to control laws and regulations. A neutral foreign policy plays a great importance to the increasing role of Indonesia within the ASEAN and the Organization of Islamic Conference. Indonesia has refused to enter into military alliances with other countries, allowing no military bases on its territory, and upholds the principles of peace, stability and democracy at the regional and international levels. The democratization is now challenged by corruption which prevails all over the country and unrest which may happen because of poverty and injustice acts.
SHARI’AH BYLAWS IN INDONESIA AND THEIR IMPLICATIONS FOR RELIGIOUS MINORITIES Fanani, Ahmad Fuad
JOURNAL OF INDONESIAN ISLAM Vol 5, No 1 (2011)
Publisher : State Islamic University (UIN) of Sunan Ampel Surabaya

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (232.5 KB) | DOI: 10.15642/JIIS.2011.5.1.17-34

Abstract

This article examines the implementation of shari’ah bylaws as a response to the regional autonomy law passed in 1999 and their implications for religious minorities. Under this regional autonomy regulation, local governments at the district level have authority to issue their own regulations. There are three broad sets of issues in Indonesian shari’ah bylaws: public order and social problems, religious skills and obligations, and religious symbolism. The article argues that the introduction of such bylaws has many negative implications for religious minorities in Indonesia. This is, it further argues, because many of religious minority groups are forced to observe the same regulations as mainstream Muslims. Shari’ah bylaws, it goes on to say, have also caused discrimination against religious minorities. Attempts to keep wary eyes on the the negative implications of the enactment of shari’ah bylaws need, therefore, to be undertaken. This responsibility is not in the hands of the government, but also Muslim communities at large. The Indonesian government must treat all social and religious groups equally, guaranteeing no discrimination against each of them. Muslim communities are deeply in need of exploring and practicing the substance, and not the formal aspects, of shari’ah.
IN THE NAME OF DEMOCRACY: Commoditization of Religions by Political Parties in Indonesia Santoso, Purwo
JOURNAL OF INDONESIAN ISLAM Vol 4, No 1 (2010)
Publisher : State Islamic University (UIN) of Sunan Ampel Surabaya

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (191.952 KB) | DOI: 10.15642/JIIS.2010.4.1.91-108

Abstract

Religion plays an important but problematic role in complying with the prevailing global standard of liberal democracy. The root of the problem is actually the shortcut in institutionalizing political party as a modern set up for individual participation in public affairs. Despite its institutional defect, political parties officially serve as the only legitimate channel to enter the state through open competition. Hence, the need to win election resulted in mobilization of religious-based support, and religion serves more as commodity for solidarity making, rather than set of fundamental values. This paper examines the political pactices in bringing the principles of both democracy and religion into daily real life. It particularly focuses on the exercises of commoditizing religion by political parties. This commoditization of religion can be taken as clear evidence, the paper argues, that religion is ill-treated by the underperforming political parties.
ISLAM AND (POLITICAL) LIBERALISM: A Note on An Evolving Debate in Indonesia Abdi, Supriyanto
JOURNAL OF INDONESIAN ISLAM Vol 3, No 2 (2009)
Publisher : State Islamic University (UIN) of Sunan Ampel Surabaya

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (179.112 KB) | DOI: 10.15642/JIIS.2009.3.2.370-389

Abstract

This paper is divided into three parts. The first part will provide a general overview of some major approaches in the discussion on the relationship between Islam and liberalism. Following this, the next section will briefly elaborate Talal Asad’s notion of Islam as ‘a discursive tradition’ and John Rawls’ distinction between liberalism and political liberalism and how they might contribute to the discussion on the relationship between Islam and liberalism. In the final part, the paper will then present a general observation on the evolving encounter between Islam and liberalism in Indonesia and the accompanying debate over this encounter among major Islamic groups in the country. In doing so, it will be argued that while liberalism as a comprehensive doctrine has been, and will remain, contested among Indonesan Muslims, there has been a growing support among them for ‘political liberalism’, although not in a purely Ralwsian sense.
MANUFACTURING THE “ONTOLOGICAL ENEMY”: Socio-Political Construction of anti-Democracy Discourses among HTI Activists in Post-New Order Indonesia Hilmy, Masdar
JOURNAL OF INDONESIAN ISLAM Vol 3, No 2 (2009)
Publisher : State Islamic University (UIN) of Sunan Ampel Surabaya

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (211.952 KB) | DOI: 10.15642/JIIS.2009.3.2.341-369

Abstract

The Indonesian Islamists’ rejection of demo­cracy, as this paper will demonstrate, is not monolithic; it is complex and multifaceted that is accompanied by a long process of argument building. This paper focuses its scope of analysis on Hizbut Tahrir Indonesia (HTI), a Middle Eastern-derived “transnational” Islamist movement that seeks to unite all Muslim nations all over the world under a Caliphate system. This paper argues that, in developing counter-discourses on democracy, the HTI activists employ both theological approach and modern socio-political narratives. It is also argued that the concept of enemy constructed by the HTI activists serves only as an ontological venture, and not existential one, for the purpose of self-fulfilling prophecy. The process of construction of the enemy follows the mode of binary opposition between the “authentic self” and the “corrupted other.” This paper borrows much of its theoretical framework from Saphiro, Foucault, Berger and Luckmann, and still many others.
PLURALISM DISCOURSE: The Views of Young Muhammadiyah Intellectuals Biyanto, Biyanto
JOURNAL OF INDONESIAN ISLAM Vol 3, No 2 (2009)
Publisher : State Islamic University (UIN) of Sunan Ampel Surabaya

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (198.199 KB) | DOI: 10.15642/JIIS.2009.3.2.314-340

Abstract

This article discusses the issue of religious pluralism in the perspective of young Muhammadiyah intellectuals. It aims at understanding the social construction and configuration of this issue. It uses as an approach the sociology of knowledge, emphasising the interrelatedness of the product of thought and social background. It argues that the understanding of religious pluralism of young Muhammadiyah intellectuals varies. Those who accept religious pluralism and those who reject it have different understandings on this concept. Some embrace religious pluralism because of social, political, anthropological, philosophical, and theological perspec­tives. For them, pluralism is different from plurality, tolerance, and relativism. Those who reject religious pluralism perceive the idea of pluralism from philosophical and theological perspectives. In this sense, pluralism is understood as relativism. Their different views and attitudes are due to their different social construction namely education, social interaction, and the genealogy of knowledge.
RELIGIOUS COURT IN INDONESIA: History and Prospect Idri, Idri
JOURNAL OF INDONESIAN ISLAM Vol 3, No 2 (2009)
Publisher : State Islamic University (UIN) of Sunan Ampel Surabaya

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (173.119 KB) | DOI: 10.15642/JIIS.2009.3.2.297-313

Abstract

Since the enactment of Law No. 7 in 1989, religious courts have gained an equal position, in terms of jurisdiction, to other courts in Indonesia, a status that took a considerable time to realize. This article discusses the historical development of religious courts in Indonesia from the early period of Islam in the country to the post-independence period. It particularly highlights internal and external factors which underpin the development of religious courts. Further, this paper examines the develop­ment of religious courts under the auspices of the Supreme Court. In the early period of Islam in Indonesia, there was no explicit dichotomy between Islamic and public courts. Religious courts had sole power in the judiciary. During the colonial period, however, the Dutch and Japanese limited the authority of religious courts. After Indonesian independence, the status and authority of religious courts did not change much until the implementation of the Law in 1989.
PESANTREN AND PARTICIPATORY DEVELOPMENT: The Case of the Pesantren Maslakul Huda of Kajen, Pati, Central Java Budiwiranto, Bambang
JOURNAL OF INDONESIAN ISLAM Vol 3, No 2 (2009)
Publisher : State Islamic University (UIN) of Sunan Ampel Surabaya

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (236.563 KB) | DOI: 10.15642/JIIS.2009.3.2.267-296

Abstract

This chapter discusses the implementation of participatory development in the pesantren Maslakul Huda of Kajen, Pati, Central Java. It argues that participatory development in the pesantren Maslakul Huda has led to the creation of genuine participation in which local people are able to identify their own problems and potentials, and to create alternative solutions. The role of the kyai in this pesantren  is limited to giving Islamic justification to the acceptance of participatory development, and program implementation is in the hands of senior santris and village facilitators. The use of participatory action research and the creation of the self-help group as a people’s forum enable them to express their own perspective on their problems without the kyai’s interference. However, the pesantren utilises participatory development to enhance its economic position among the local people.

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