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INDONESIA
IJEE (Indonesian Journal of English Education)
ISSN : 23561777     EISSN : 24430390     DOI : -
Core Subject : Education,
IJEE (Indonesian Journal of English Education) is a peer-reviewed journal of English Education Department, Faculty of Tarbiyah and Teachers Training, UIN Syarif Hidayatullah Jakarta. The journal aims at improving the quality of research on the area of English education which is issued twice in a year.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 90 Documents
THE EXPRESSIONS OF EXCLAMATION: A CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS IN AUSTRALIAN ENGLISH AND BAHASA INDONESIA Adrefiza, Adrefiza
IJEE (Indonesian Journal of English Education) IJEE (Indonesian Journal of English Education)| Vol. 1 | No.1 | 2014
Publisher : Syarif Hidayatullah State Islamic University of Jakarta, Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.15408/ijee.v1i1.1191

Abstract

This study investigated and compared exclamatory expressions performed by native speakers of Australian English and Bahasa Indonesia. Three different contexts and situations were selected as the prompts for the respondents to express their exclamations: (a) surprise; (b) enthusiasm; and (c) annoyance. Based on data from 36 respondents of both languages, the findings revealed that both Australian English and Bahasa Indonesia were likely to utilize different types of exclamatory words, phrases or expressions of surprise, enthusiastic and annoyance. Te expressions seemed to be systematic in their constructions and the selection of words or phrases remained personal and indicated the speakers‟ feeling, attitude, and emotion. In expressing surprise and enthusiasm, in particular, the selection of words or phrases by both language communities tended to use positive and socially acceptable exclamatory expressions. However, when they turned to express annoyance, most of the words, phrases, or expressions used were often taboo and socially unacceptable.
SCHEMA THEORY IN READING CLASS Fahriany, Fahriany
IJEE (Indonesian Journal of English Education) IJEE (Indonesian Journal of English Education)| Vol. 1 | No.1 | 2014
Publisher : Syarif Hidayatullah State Islamic University of Jakarta, Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.15408/ijee.v1i1.1192

Abstract

Comprehension is making a sense out of text. It is a process of using reader’s existing knowledge (schemata) to interpret texts in order to construct meaning. Many reading experts agree that the schema theory is one of the reasonable theories of human information processing. Schemata, the plural of schema, are believed to be the building blocks of cognition. This paper discusses the role of readers’ preexisting knowledge on linguistics code as well as readers’ knowledge of the world (schema), which for the case of reading has similar importance of the printed words in the text. It is argued that the more non visual information the reader posses, the less visual information is needed. For teaching and learning, teachers are expected to use different strategies in order to deal with different students’ preexisting knowledge and schema to maximize students’ learning.
AN INVESTIGATION OF INDONESIAN STUDENTS’ ABILITY IN PRODUCING THE THIRD PERSON SINGULAR /S/ IN SPEAKING Fitriah, Fitriah
IJEE (Indonesian Journal of English Education) IJEE (Indonesian Journal of English Education)| Vol. 1 | No.1 | 2014
Publisher : Syarif Hidayatullah State Islamic University of Jakarta, Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.15408/ijee.v1i1.1193

Abstract

This study examined the ability of Indonesian students in producing the third person /s/ in speaking. Seven respondents were presented with two speaking tasks and questions related to their daily activity and picture descriptions. Overall, results showed that the majority of the respondents were able to produce agreement in speaking, although only five respondents could produce agreement correctly above 30%. Therefore, the study suggested that strategies other than speaking should be examined if they could better facilitate students’ production of the third person singular /s/. In the last decade, psycho linguistics has shown strong interest in the production of subject-verb agreement. Several studies have identified the types of errors that most frequently occur in language production. These studies report observations on agreement errors in oral English (Haskel & Macdonald 2005; Hartsuiker & Barkhusyen 2006; Johnson, Villiers & Seymour 2005; Johnson 2005), written French (Hupet, Fayol & Schelstraete 1998; Fayol, Hupet &Largy 1999; Largy & Fayol 2001) and written German (Hemforth & Konieczny 2003). One example of a study which observed agreement errors in oral English was conducted by Haskel and Macdonald (2005). They examined agreement with disjunctive subjects which contained plurality nouns (singular-plural noun and plural- singular noun, e.g. have/has the president or the senators read the documents yet?). The research proved that in relation to agreement with disjunctions like „the president or the senators‟, English speakers tend to prefer a verb form that agrees with the nearer of the two nouns (Haskel & Macdonald, 2005). An investigation of working memory affecting the production of agreement errors in speaking was conducted by Hartsuiker & Barkhusyen (2006). To manipulate the availability of working memory, half of the participants had to remember the list of words while performing the primary (load condition) and half of the others performed the primary task without a memory load. All participants were given the speaking span test and had to perform under specific time constraints. The researchers assumed that agreement errors would occur more frequently in the load condition than in the no-load condition. In this study, there were 64 subjects from the University of Nijmegen participating; they were all native speakers of Dutch. In the presentation of the speaking span test in the load condition, the participants were presented with an adjective (e.g. large) that was followed by a sentence fragment (e.g. the cup for the winners). In the no-load condition, the adjective and sentence fragment were presented at the same time. Then, the participants were instructed to repeat and complete each fragment so they berita terkini indonesia had a full sentence, using the adjective (e.g. the cup for the winners was large) before the deadline. In this experiment, the result confirmed the researchers’ hypothesis that agreement errors were more common in the load condition than in the no-load condition, and the errors occurred more frequently when the head noun was mismatched in the number with the local noun (e.g. the colour on the canvasses). Though there are many research studies on verb agreement, in my study, a different attempt was made to elicit the respondents’ ability in producing the third person /s/ in speaking. I chose not to use complex subjects (which have plurality of the head noun and the local noun). I preferred obvious subjects, for example, ‘she, he, the girl, the boy’ (from which the number of the subjects is clear). The goal of the study was to examine the ability of Indonesian students to produce third person singular /s/ in speaking. I analyzed only the productive of agreement markers (there is /s/ inflection), such as, she walks, the girl works, he cleans. In conjunction with this stated purpose, the following research questions guide the current study: 1. Do advanced learners produce third person /s/ in speaking? 2. How well do they produce the third person /s/ in speaking?
UNDERSTANDING AND REFLECTION OF ISSUES IN LANGUAGE EDUCATION RESEARCH Jazadi, Iwan
IJEE (Indonesian Journal of English Education) IJEE (Indonesian Journal of English Education)| Vol. 1 | No.1 | 2014
Publisher : Syarif Hidayatullah State Islamic University of Jakarta, Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.15408/ijee.v1i1.1194

Abstract

As future researchers, can students and practitioners in language education just enter an actual research project without adequate theoretical understanding of it. Can they expect that they would understand it while doing the research. If not, what sorts of understanding should they possess. In other words, are there several issues which should be addressed in order that they are well informed about how and what to carry out research satisfactorily. The answer to this last question is „yes‟, even not only addressed to students, but also to school teachers and lecturers or the academic community at large. This is because theoretical understanding should continue to be developed berita terkini update and refreshed. Consequently, before embarking on a research project, one should understand some key updated issues which develop around her/his field of specialization, both global and local issues. Global issues involve the development of new or popular trends in social sciences and particularly in language educational research. In addition the intertextual relations of research in the field and other related fields, the interconnection between and among researchers and other stakeholders should be taken into consideration. The local issues include the possibilities of carrying out research in a certain context which may differ depending on the contexts, the means available as well as the constraints which influence the research implementation. All these informing issues are of high contribution for making decisions about doing research. The discussion is compelling because, as a matter of fact, literature in English language teaching (e.g., articles in TEFLIN Journal, „Indonesian Linguistic Journal‟, and many open access national and international journals) has not given a comprehensive attention on how stakeholders in research should manage each of their power, how ethical issues should be dealt with properly, and how trustworthiness is particularly addressed. Generally informed by social sciences research literature and relevant ELT references, the author highlights the major decisions which researchers are faced with, in relation to power, ethics, truth claims and methodological considerations in research. Based on the highlights, the author then reflects on the issues for carrying out research in Indonesian English language teaching contexts as informed by his professional experience and observation
TEACHING WRITING THROUGHT DICTOGLOSS Dewi, Ratna Sari
IJEE (Indonesian Journal of English Education) IJEE (Indonesian Journal of English Education)| Vol. 1 | No.1 | 2014
Publisher : Syarif Hidayatullah State Islamic University of Jakarta, Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.15408/ijee.v1i1.1195

Abstract

The objective of this study is to help students in developing their ideas in writing due to their difficulties to arrange ideas. Although they do have ideas, they cannot structure their ideas well in their papers. Several factors could cause this problem such as lack of vocabulary and knowledge or strategies in arranging ideas in papers. Another factor is unclear explanation and insufficient guidance from the teachers. Based on literature review, dictoglos can be a guide for students to develop their ideas in writing. It is a teaching technique which incorporates various activities such listening, taking notes, discussing, and reconstructing which have some standard procedures and variations. English as an international language has been known all over the world. People cannot deny it, because many countries use and learn the language. The fact shows that the language is used as a second or a foreign language in each country in the world. Many people learn it to get involved in the world globalization era, where English in written or oral form of communication is used. Therefore, it is a must for people to learn English. Whether they are students, worker, or other occupations that they belong to, they must study English. It can be learned through learning at school, in a course, or in their own ways. People must learn the language skills in order to master English well. The journey of the learning could be similar to a child learning to walk where he may fall down to the floor and get up to stand again and learn to walk continuously so that he can walk well. It is also the same when we learn a language. We must start from listening, speaking, reading and writing. The four language skills should be learned continuously and patiently. Writing as one of the language skill at any level of education that has to be mastered is rather difficult than other skills. Students feel difficult to arrange their ideas in papers. Actually they have ideas but it is hard for them to deliver it into their paper or they have many ideas but they cannot choose what ideas should be chosen to develop. It happens because they have lack of vocabulary, cannot arrange the ideas correctly, berita terkini internasional do not know how to develop their ideas. This could happen because there is no clear enough information from the teacher. It is also possible that the teacher do not teach well. In addition to teachers, it should be acknowledged that there are many other factors that cause the inability of students to write in English. Because some problems above, the writer wants to give an alternative solution to overcome the problem that is an approach to teach writing. It is hoped that the students have ability to develop their ideas in writing. The approach is called Dictogloss. In this approach students is trained to write their elaboration of one idea or improve simply an idea or a topic chosen by a teacher or they choose it freely from their own.
A STUDY OF ERRORS IN THE THIRD SINGULAR PRONOUNS OF SIMPLE PRESENT TENSE BY USING INTERLANGUAGE ANALYSIS AS AN APPROACH. A CASE STUDY Pandarangga, Salmon
IJEE (Indonesian Journal of English Education) IJEE (Indonesian Journal of English Education)| Vol. 1 | No.1 | 2014
Publisher : Syarif Hidayatullah State Islamic University of Jakarta, Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.15408/ijee.v1i1.1196

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to analyze factors contributing to errors made in learning English as a target language (TL). Employing a case study research, the participant was interviewed for approximately 30 minutes about daily activities and experiences in learning English. This research focuses in analysing the participant‟s use of third singular pronoun in simple present tense. The findings revealed that errors made by TL learners are mainly influenced by some factors related to their TL‟s and native language‟s (NL) knowledge, systems and rules. These factors are coexisted and interconnected in TL learners‟ minds. This is against Robert Lado‟s argument which mentioned that learner made errors in TL learning because of the interference from NL. The study provides pedagogical implications that TL teachers should perceive errors made by the learners as a sign of language learning and development; therefore they should not be discouraged to learn. Also, TL teachers should be aware of their very important roles to help, to guide and to lead the learners‟ progress in learning the TL. The future subsequent studies should consider of involving more sample size over a longer period of time as to obtain to a more generalized finding. Target language (TL) learning is often challenging for learners. This is because of the vast differences between their native language and the TL in terms of rules, forms and knowledge. Some learners find learning fun while others find it frustrating. Learners exert considerable effort to become competent speakers or even to emulate native speakers. For example, they strive for perfect pronunciation. In their efforts to learn the TL, learners usually make errors. Some teachers strongly believe making mistakes is an important part of the learning process and that it enables learners to improve their TL skills. Other teachers perceive errors negatively as obstacles in learning, and therefore believe errors need to be eliminated. These teachers have limited tolerance with learners who make errors. Other teachers might ignore errors, or they simply do not know how to address them. It is widely assumed that errors occur because of the interference of NL and the degree of difference between TL and NL. It appears that learners transfer rules, forms and knowledge of NL to TL. For example, learners in Indonesia might believe that the rules, forms and knowledge of Bahasa Indonesia are similar to English. Some theorists consider errors as a learning process. It demonstrates the mind‟s ability to adapt, transform and restructure NL and TL language systems to a new language system. These theorists also believe that errors are reflections of the learner‟s efforts to comprehend the TL systems and knowledge. In other words, berita terkini indonesia are reflections of a new language system being constructed. This new system combines elements of both the NL and the TL. Therefore, it is strongly argued that TL learners make errors as efforts to construct a new language system which is somehow different from the system of NL and TL and not interference of NL to TL. This paper is intended to analyze factors contributing to errors made in learning English as a foreign language. Key words: errors, interference, interlanguage
CONSIDERABLE STRATEGIES OF TEACHING LARGE MULTI-LEVEL CLASSES: A NARRATIVE STUDY OF WHAT EFL TEACHERS SHOULD DO Salwa, Salwa
IJEE (Indonesian Journal of English Education) IJEE (Indonesian Journal of English Education)| Vol. 1 | No.1 | 2014
Publisher : Syarif Hidayatullah State Islamic University of Jakarta, Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.15408/ijee.v1i1.1197

Abstract

Teaching classes in which there is a uniformity of learners‟ proficiency level is the most ideal environment in language classes since it enables teachers to apply appropriate teaching and learning strategies based on the individual student‟s level. However, in EFL settings, most teachers especially in school environments have to teach classes in which the learners have multiple levels of ability, since at schools, there is no placement test on students‟ ability of English as is usually done in private language institutions. This paper provides some useful strategies which can be applied by teachers in teaching classes where true and false beginners are within the same class. Applying these strategies is expected to assist weaker students to get benefit from interacting with stronger students without holding back the strong ones. Teaching English in the EFL context needs more efforts and persistence since the target language (TL) is not used in the daily conversation. In addition, it is common to find large and mixed- ability students in the EFL contexts, which management is surely not easy. Consequently, EFL teachers often find both true and false beginners in a classroom. According to Brown (2007) true beginners are students who do not have any knowledge of the target language, whereas false beginners are those who have previously studied the target language ( they have been familiar with alphabets, simple greetings, etc), but they remember only a little of what they have learned. Due to the characteristics of beginners who still have a high dependency on their teachers as a role model , the most suitable approach to be applied in this kind of class is the teacher-centered classroom (Brown, 2007). Therefore, in this novice stage, teachers play a significant role in helping the lower level students to improve their language skills. Since there are two levels of beginners in this kind of class, a good language teacher should apply some special techniques to successfully teach this mixed-ability class as teaching this kind of class needs more preparation berita terkini terbaru and special techniques than teaching in placed or streamed classes .I am going to provide some strategies which can be applied in teaching true and false beginners within a class.
THE ROLE OF TECHNOLOGY IN EFL CLASSROOM Haswani, Fahri
IJEE (Indonesian Journal of English Education) IJEE (Indonesian Journal of English Education)| Vol. 1 | No.2 | 2014
Publisher : Syarif Hidayatullah State Islamic University of Jakarta, Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.15408/ijee.v1i2.1303

Abstract

In  response  to  an  appeal  from  Indonesia’s  Ministry  of  Education  and  Culture  to  all universities and colleges to improve the quality of tertiary  education toward regional and international standard, language institutions are making great efforts to further promote the  foreign  language  learning  process.  In  the  last  few  years  there  have  been  dramatic changes  in  the  ways  that  languages  are  taught  by communicative  approach  and  the introduction of technological tools. In recent years, the use of technological aids, especially those related to computers, has increasingly become  a common feature of the classroom. There is no doubt that computer based instruction will occupy a more central role in the foreign language classroom in the future. Information technology has drawn the interest of teachers of English as a second or foreign language in non-English speaking countries. The technology integration into  the curriculum is not a single concept which is generated from one  single  theory  nor  does  it  give  full  guidelines  for  the  implementation  in  practical situation. This issue constitutes ideas from many different theories. This paper  discusses the issue of technology contributions in EFL classroom. The question raised in this paper is how technology facilitates  the attainment of course goals.  The answer of the question will help  English  teachers  to  clarify  the  real  problems  of  the  initiative  so  that  the  innovation and possible changes can be aligned with the need of the students. However, this literature review  only  covers  limited  issues  related  with  the  role  of  technology  in  EFL  classroom. Further  discussion  from  other  different  points  of  view  is  still  needed  to  create  more complete description of conceptual foundation of the innovation.
TEACHERS’ VOICES ON THE 2013 CURRICULUM FOR ENGLISH INSTRUCTIONAL ACTIVITIES Nur, Maulidia Rachmawati; Madkur, Ahmad
IJEE (Indonesian Journal of English Education) IJEE (Indonesian Journal of English Education)| Vol. 1 | No.2 | 2014
Publisher : Syarif Hidayatullah State Islamic University of Jakarta, Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.15408/ijee.v1i2.1340

Abstract

Curriculum is undoubtedly an inseparable part of education. In Indonesia, education curriculum has already undergone several changes. Among others, the newly introduced and implemented one is called Curriculum 2013 (K-13). Involving a “scientific approach”, this curriculum is expected to answer both the needs and the challenges to improve the quality of education in Indonesia. Nevertheless, the implementation of this curriculum gives birth to some pros and cons. The present paper is aimed at providing a picture of challenges, opportunities and teachers’ perception on the use of this curriculum in English teaching. The data were collected through in-depth interview to six English teachers in six pilot schools in Bogor and Lampung. The analysis shows that most teachers accepted the curriculum. However, according to them, the curriculum should be evaluated and further developed.
RELATING EFL LEARNERS’ GRAMMAR KNOWLEDGE TO THEIR USE OF PRAGMATIC EXPRESSIONS Husna, Nida
IJEE (Indonesian Journal of English Education) IJEE (Indonesian Journal of English Education)| Vol. 1 | No.2 | 2014
Publisher : Syarif Hidayatullah State Islamic University of Jakarta, Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.15408/ijee.v1i2.1341

Abstract

When people use language as a tool to communicate, the meaning that is conveyed or received will be more than what is heard from the explicit utterances. It is believed that the language we use as the code can be interpreted in any meaning, which interpretation becomes part of pragmatics. Grammar ability and pragmatic competence should work together to create good communication and avoid misunderstanding. This paper presents three aspects. The first aspect is the kinds of pragmatic knowledge that the EFL learners may have about their foreign language they are learning. The second aspect is how the EFL learners use their foreign linguistic expressions in a contextually appropriate manner within their daily communication. The last one is to what extent the EFL learners understand the implicit messages of expressions.