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INDONESIA
Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi)
Published by Universitas Airlangga
ISSN : 19783728     EISSN : 24429740     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
The Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) (e-ISSN:2442-9740; p-ISSN:1978-3728) is published by the Faculty of Dental Medicine, Universitas Airlangga. Its diciplinary focus is dental science and dental hygiene. The Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) is published in English on a quarterly basis with each 50-60 page edition containing between nine and eleven scientific articles on research, study literature and case studies. Contributors to the Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) included: dental researchers, dental practitioners, lecturers, and students drawn from Indonesia and a wide range of other countries.
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Articles 709 Documents
Effects of sidestream tobacco smoke on P53 expressions in Rattus novergicus tongue epithelial mucosa Angriany, Dian; Ernawati, Diah Savitri; Parmadiati, Adiastuti Endah; Hendarti, Hening Tuti; Zain, Rosnah Binti
Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) Vol 52, No 3 (2019): September 2019
Publisher : Faculty of Dental Medicine, Universitas Airlangga https://fkg.unair.ac.id/en

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.20473/j.djmkg.v52.i3.p138-141

Abstract

Background: Smoking, both active and passive, has been widely recognised as toxic to the human body, since it induces several forms of cancer, including that affecting the oral cavity. Benzopyrene, the carcinogen contained in tobacco smoke, can even lead tocarcinogenesis which potentially affects the regulation of cell apoptosis in both active and passive smokers. Purpose: This study aims to investigate the carcinogenic effects of cigarette smoke on apoptosis of rat tongue mucosae through p53 expression. To determine the risk of malignant transformation through tumor suppressor genes in the apoptotic pathway. Methods: Rattus norvegicus subjects were divided into four groups, namely Treatment Group 1 exposed to sidestream cigarette smoke for four weeks (P1), Treatment Group 2 exposed to sidestream cigarette smoke for eight weeks (P2), Control Group not exposed to sidestream cigarette smoke for four weeks (K2), and Control Group (K) not exposed to sidestream cigarette smoke for eight weeks (K2). The exposure process was conducted using a smoking pump and alternating exposure. Four micron-thick sections of formalin were subsequently fixed together with paraffin embedded biopsy material from tongue mucosa of Rattus norvegicus. The tissue sections from the treatment groups were then analyzed immunohistochemically to compare the expressions of p53 and Bcl-2 proteins with those of the control groups. Results: The T-test results indicated statistically significant differences in the expressions of p53 between the 4-week control group (K1) and the 4-week treatment group (P1) (p=0.01, p<0.05) as well as between the 8-week control group (K2) and the 8-week treatment group (P2) (p=0.03, p<0.05). Conclusion: Exposure to cigarette smoke can induce changes in tumor suppressor genes and also affect the regulation of cell apoptosis, thus changing cell structure and leading to malignancy.
PERIPHERAL OSSIFYING FIBROMA OF THE ANTERIOR MAXILLARY GINGIVA Anugraha, Ganendra; Sumarta, Ni Putu Mira
Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) Vol 52, No 4 (2019): (December 2019)
Publisher : Faculty of Dental Medicine, Universitas Airlangga

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.20473/j.djmkg.v52.i4.p204-208

Abstract

Background: Peripheral ossifying fibroma is a rejuvenation of the reactive gingiva, usually occurring in the anterior maxillary gingiva. The condition is often clinically ambiguous when diagnosed on the basis of gingival hyperplastic lesions such as focal fibrous hyperplasia, peripheral giant cell granuloma, peripheral fibroma and pyogenic granuloma because peripheral ossifying fibroma has a tendency to recur with a ratio of around 20%. The literature on the subject predominantly classifies peripheral osifying fibroma as an epulis type, but it has also been identified as a peripheral mesenchymal tumor presenting similar clinical symptoms to ossified fibrous epulis. Purpose: The purpose of this article is to explain the rare case of peripheral ossifying fibroma in the anterior maxillary gingiva which can be clinically misdiagnosed as reactive gingival hyperplastic lesions. Case: A case report of peripheral ossifying fibroma in the left lateral incisor and canine of the maxillary gingiva in a 26 year-old male. The patient chiefly complained of a painless, slow growing gingival enlargement on the upper left jaw during the previous five years. Clinical examination confirmed it to be a single, hard swelling in the 21-24 region, pale in color and with a rough surface. Case management: The procedure constituted a complete surgical excision of the lesion together with the underlying periosteum curettage intended to prevent recurrence. The histopathologic examination results indicated tissue with squamous epithelial lining, stroma consisting of fibroblasts, and immature trabecula with osteoblastic rimming between collagen tissue without signs of malignancy. Osteoblastic rimming has specific features in histopathologic examination of ossifying fibroma. Conclusion: Peripheral ossifying fibroma is a rare solitary enlargement in the oral cavity frequently misdiagnosed as ossified fibrous epulis. A definitive diagnosis is made by means of histopathologic examination. The condition has a low reccurance rate.
Effectiveness of Anadara granosa shell-Stichopus hermanni granules at accelerating woven bone formation fourteen days after tooth extraction Sari, Rima Parwati; Kurniawan, Hansen
Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) Vol 52, No 4 (2019): December 2019
Publisher : Faculty of Dental Medicine, Universitas Airlangga https://fkg.unair.ac.id/en

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.20473/j.djmkg.v52.i4.p177-182

Abstract

Background: Post-extraction complications can cause alveolar bone resorption. Hydroxyapatite-tricalcium phosphate (HA-TCP) is one potential bone graft material that can be synthesized from Anadara granosa shell. Another biomarine, Stichopus hermanni, contains hyaluronic acid which can accelerate bone formation on the fourteenth day. Purpose: This study aims to prove the effectiveness of Anadara granosa shell-Stichopus hermanni granules in weaving bone formation fourteen days after tooth extraction. Methods: Twenty-five male Wistar rats were divided into five groups. Their lower left incisor was extracted with gelatin being administered to the control group (C) and granule scaffold derived from Anadara granosa (AG) shell and Anadara granosa shell-Stichopus hermanni at concentrations of 0.4%-0.8%-1.6% (AGSH1-AGSH2-AGSH3) to the treatment group. This study developed a HA-TCP synthesized from Anadara granosa combined with whole Stichopus hermanni to create granule scaffolds by means of a freeze-dried method. The jaw was removed on the fourteenth day post-tooth extraction. Observation of HPA involved the use of an Image Raster®. The resulting data was subjected to analysis by ANOVA and tukey-HSD tests (p<0.05). Results: Data showed the mean of C=0.157±0.078; AG=1.139±0.371; AGSH1=1.595±0.291; AGSH2=1.740±0.308; and AGSH3=1.638±0.286. Statistical analyses showed significant differences in the woven bone area (mm2) between C and the treatment groups AG;AGSH1;AGSH2; AGSH3; and between AG and the AGSH2 groups. Conclusions: Scaffold granules from Anadara granosa shells and Stichopus hermanni effectively accelerate the bone formation process with the most effective being Stichopus hermanni at a concentration of 0.8%.
The influence of functional tooth units on body mass index in the elderly of the Jember Regency Ahliawan, Jevina Sicilia; Hamzah, Zahreni; Syafriadi, Mei
Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) Vol 53, No 3 (2020): September 2020
Publisher : Faculty of Dental Medicine, Universitas Airlangga https://fkg.unair.ac.id/en

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.20473/j.djmkg.v53.i3.p144-148

Abstract

Background: Tooth loss can disrupt the mastication process. Mastication disorders limit the amount of food a person consumes, affecting nutrition. The number of functional tooth units (FTUs) can affect nutritional status, measured using the body mass index (BMI). Purpose: The purpose of this study is to analyse the effect of the number of FTUs on the BMI in the elderly. Methods: This research was conducted in four villages in the Jember Regency. The number of subjects was 189, aged 45 years and over. The number of FTUs was calculated based on the anterior and posterior teeth that have contact with the antagonist and the BMI using the BMI formula. The data was analysed using a linear regression test; the level of significance is 0.005. Results: A simple linear regression test showed that there was significant correlation between FTU and BMI (p=0.366). Conclusion: The number of FTUs affects BMI; the higher the number of FTUs, the greater the BMI.
The changing of occlusal plane inclination in Class II malocclusion Yohana, Nelvi; Bahirrah, Siti; Nazruddin, N.
Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) Vol 53, No 3 (2020): September 2020
Publisher : Faculty of Dental Medicine, Universitas Airlangga https://fkg.unair.ac.id/en

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.20473/j.djmkg.v53.i3.p133-139

Abstract

Background: Camouflage treatment of skeletal Class II malocclusion can be performed using extraction or non-extraction techniques. These treatments can cause changes in occlusal plane. Steep occlusal plane during corrective treatment generally relapses after active orthodontic treatment, resulting in unstable interdigitation. Purpose: This study aims to determine and evaluate changes in occlusal plane inclination in skeletal Class II malocclusion cases using extraction or non-extraction techniques of the permanent maxillary first premolar. Methods: The samples consisted of initial and final cephalometry of 40 adult patients with skeletal Class II malocclusion divided into two groups, namely extraction of the permanent maxillary first premolar and non-extraction group. The inclination of occlusal planes in both groups was measured using the ImageJ software, then the factors associated with these changes were observed. Furthermore, the occlusal plane inclination was compared between the extraction and non-extraction groups by using t-test. Results: The occlusal plane inclination in the non-extraction group increased slightly, while the inclination in the extraction group increased significantly (p = 0.017, p-value < 0.05). However, there was no correlation found in the occlusal plane inclination between the extraction and non-extraction groups (p = 0.07, p-value < 0.05). Conclusion: Class II malocclusion correction with either extraction or non-extraction of the maxillary first premolar increased the inclination of the occlusal plane. This study indicated that control of the occlusal plane inclination is highly essential.
The effect of body mass index on tooth eruption and dental caries Younus, Mohamed Salim; Ahmed, Karam; Kala, Duran
Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) Vol 53, No 3 (2020): September 2020
Publisher : Faculty of Dental Medicine, Universitas Airlangga https://fkg.unair.ac.id/en

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.20473/j.djmkg.v53.i3.p140-143

Abstract

Background: Children were compared to their siblings, cousins or peers regarding the eruption of their permanent teeth. Genetic and environmental factors can affect dental development and, therefore, the body mass index (BMI) could be considered as a factor that may influence dental development. Purpose: To determine any possible association between BMI and either dental caries or the eruption of permanent teeth (central incisor and molar). Methods: A cross-sectional study was completed for six-year-old school children. A total of 218 children (116 boys, 102 girls) from public elementary schools in Erbil City were entered into the study. Dental caries assessments were carried out using the WHO criteria for decayed, missing and filled primary teeth and indices (DMFT). BMI was used to classify obesity status. Results: Overall, 27.98% of the children were classified as overweight, 59.17% as normal and 12.84% as underweight. The DMFT was 5.247, while 12.39% of the children were caries-free. Conclusions: Children of normal weight had most permanent teeth erupted and a low caries index. Underweight children had fewer erupted teeth and a higher caries index. The complex relationship between body composition and oral health should be considered in paediatric patients.
Adjunctive radiograph diagnostic in vertical mandibular asymmetry Moorthy, Kirubanandan Sathya; Sofyanti, Ervina; Boel, Trelia; Govanny, Jesslyn Okto; Rachmawati, Aditya
Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) Vol 54, No 1 (2021): March 2021
Publisher : Faculty of Dental Medicine, Universitas Airlangga https://fkg.unair.ac.id/en

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.20473/j.djmkg.v54.i1.p21-24

Abstract

Background: The development of radio diagnostics in orthodontics is still a challenge in treating skeletal anomaly with facial asymmetry. The assessment of skeletal symmetry, which can be obtained by frontal radiographs such as panoramic radiograph and posteroanterior cephalograph, is still limited. Purpose: The aim of this study is to evaluate panoramic radiograph and posteroanterior cephalograph in measuring the vertical mandibular asymmetry based on Kjellberg technique. Methods: This study was a cross-sectional study of 43 pre-treatment panoramic radiographs and posteroanterior cephalographs from dental faculty students at Universitas Sumatera Utara between 18–25 years old. The subjects have fully erupted permanent teeth until the second molar and complained about facial asymmetry. The validity and reliability of vertical mandibular asymmetry of Kjellberg technique with Cliniview software in both radiographs used Cohen-K analysis. Results: The measurement of vertical mandibular asymmetry showed no significant differences using panoramic radiograph and posteroanterior cephalograph (0.073-0.321 > 0.05). Conclusion: The vertical mandibular asymmetry analysis with Kjellberg technique in panoramic radiograph is potent as an adjunctive diagnostic tool in vertical mandibular asymmetry.
Orthodontic camouflage treatment using a passive self-ligating system in skeletal Class III malocclusion Monika, Fransiska; Widayati, Retno
Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) Vol 53, No 4 (2020): December 2020
Publisher : Faculty of Dental Medicine, Universitas Airlangga https://fkg.unair.ac.id/en

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.20473/j.djmkg.v53.i4.p191-195

Abstract

Background: The treatment options for adults with skeletal Class III malocclusion can be dentoalveolar compensation, also known as orthodontic camouflage, or orthognathic surgery. Camouflage treatment can be carried out with teeth extractions, distalisation of the mandibular dentition, and use of Class III intermaxillary elastics. However, intermaxillary elastics as anchorage has its own risk–benefit. Purpose: To explain that camouflage treatment with teeth extractions can be performed in a mild to moderate skeletal Class III malocclusion using intermaxillary anchorage with elastics, while minimising the deleterious effects and achieving a satisfactory treatment outcome. Case: Our patient was a 25-year-old female who had a skeletal Class III pattern, with normal maxilla and a protruded mandible. She had a straight facial profile with a Class III canine and molar relationship on her right and left sides. Anterior crossbite was also present with crowding on both the maxilla and the mandible. Case Management: The treatment plan was carried out with dentoalveolar compensation by extracting teeth. Extraction of the lower first premolars was conducted to eliminate the crowding and correct the anterior crossbite. The mandibular incisors were retroclined and the maxillary incisors were proclined with dentoalveolar compensation. Passive self-ligating system was used with standard torque prescription, intermaxillary anchorage, and no additional appliances for anchorage control. Class I canine and incisor relationship were both achieved at the end of the treatment, while maintaining the Class III molar relationship. Conclusion: Orthodontic camouflage treatment in an adult patient using a passive self-ligating system and intermaxillary anchorage can improve facial profile and improve dental occlusion.
Maxillary anterior root resorption in Class II/I malocclusion patients post fixed orthodontic treatment Tallo, Fransiska Rima; Narmada, Ida Bagus; Ardani, I. G. A. Wahju
Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) Vol 53, No 4 (2020): December 2020
Publisher : Faculty of Dental Medicine, Universitas Airlangga https://fkg.unair.ac.id/en

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.20473/j.djmkg.v53.i4.p201-205

Abstract

Background: Previous studies on root resorption were reviewed by panoramic radiographs. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) showed that 41.5% of teeth experienced resorption when panoramically examinated, while 68% of teeth experienced resorption when the examination method used was CBCT. Root resorption occurs in the maxillary central incisor (as much as 74%) and in the maxillary lateral incisor (as much as 82%). The maxillary canines have the most resorption, followed by the lateral maxillary incisors. Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine the differences of apical resorption in anterior maxillary teeth before and after orthodontic treatment in skeletal Class I/II cases of extraction. Methods: Samples from this study were the results of panoramic photographs of 50 patients treated by fixed orthodontic appliances at the Dental and Oral Hospital Airlangga University. These were selected according to the sample criteria. The evaluation method consists of measuring root and crown lengths with a digital application (RadiAnt DICOM Viewer). Subsequently, the measurements were evaluated using CBCT images. Results: The data were statistically analysed using normality tests with Shapiro–Wilk and Kolmogorov–Smirnov tests. Based on the results of paired sample tests, it was found that every treatment group had significant differences in the average length of the crowns and roots, with a result of p=0.000 (p<0.05). Conclusion: The use of CBCT is considered quite effective and accurate in evaluating root resorption compared to panoramic photographs.
Howe’s dental cast analysis of students at the University of Sumatera Utara Lubis, Hilda Fitria; Sinurat, Tiopan Beltsazar
Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi) Vol 53, No 3 (2020): September 2020
Publisher : Faculty of Dental Medicine, Universitas Airlangga https://fkg.unair.ac.id/en

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.20473/j.djmkg.v53.i3.p149-152

Abstract

Background: Cast analysis is the measurement of the upper and lower arch in a 3-dimensional occlusal relationship. Howe’s Analysis can be used to observe total tooth material, arch length, and basal arch width. Howe’s Analysis was conducted to analyse abnormalities of both teeth and the jaw to help diagnose and plan dental care. Purpose: To analyse the difference in total tooth material, arch length, basal arch width, and Howe’s Index between male and female undergraduate students from the University of Sumatera Utara who are of Proto-Malay origin. Methods: Ninety-six samples comprised of 48 male and 48 female students were recruited through the purposive sampling method. All samples were undergraduate students at the University of Sumatera Utara and of Proto-Malay origin, aged between 18 to 26, and have met the exclusion and inclusion criteria. We measured the variables using a digital caliper to measure basal arch width and arch length and Moorrees’ method to measure total tooth material. Data were analysed statistically using an independent t-test to compare means between groups (p<0.05). Results: The male samples’ average value of total tooth material 98.49 mm±3.79, arch length 45.55 mm±2.28, basal arch width 41.07 mm±2.83, and Howe’s Index were 41.71 %±2.63, respectively. The female samples had a lower value compared to the male samples, 94.51 mm, 43.27 mm, 36.89 mm, and 39.05 % respectively. There was a significant difference in the total tooth material, arch length, basal arch width, and Howe’s Index between male and female undergraduate students from the University of Sumatera Utara of Proto-Malay origin (p=0.001; p<0.05). Conclusion: The average measurement of total tooth material, arch length, basal arch width, and Howe’s Index was higher in male than female undergraduate students from the University of Sumatera Utara of Proto-Malay origin.

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